CAMPING UNLIMITED FOR THE DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED

"Giving exceptional people the opportunity to be themselves" - since 1957

aka Camp Krem   |   Boulder Creek, CA   |  http://www.campingunlimited.org

Mission

Camping Unlimited is a non-profit charitable organization providing Respite services to parents and caregivers of children and adults with developmental disabilities. We offer a range of program opportunities to our families which provide respite from the demands of daily care and supervision. Our programs foster independence, nurture responsibility, develop competence and build lifelong friendships in a warm supportive atmosphere of planned permissiveness that encourages community, recreation, education, fun and adventure.

Ruling year info

1964

Interim Executive Director

Alex Krem

Program Director

Christina Krem

Main address

102 Brook Lane

Boulder Creek, CA 95006 USA

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EIN

94-6104601

NTEE code info

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

Autism (G84)

Recreational and Sporting Camps (Day, Overnight, etc.) (N20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

After 63 years of providing respite for families and independence-building activities for people with intellectual and developmental differences, our main facility burned to the ground in the wildfires of August 2020. Most of our buildings were lost and damages are estimated between $5million and $10m. We are now in the process of rebuilding. This tragedy occurred while we were struggling to maintain a meaningful program despite the pandemic lock-down. A double blow. Previously, we were focusing on market penetration. We estimate we are serving only 2% of our natural market. Other similar programs reach another 2%. More than 95% of the children and adults who would benefit from our program are not served. We are expanding our marketing and fundraising efforts and have increased both enrollment and contribution amounts.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Main Summer Camp

Main Camp offers a traditional camp program with small groups of campers sharing a cabin with their counselors. Campers sleep in bunk beds in our rustic cabins. Bathrooms, showers, the health center and all activities are all within a very short walk.

Most meals are served family-style in our dining hall. Campers are free to choose activities that interest them from a selection of the following:

• Music Enrichment
• Swimming
• Hiking
• Talent Shows
• Dancing
• Games
• Campfires
• Gardening
• Animal Care
• Nature Study
• Arts and Crafts
• Sleeping outdoors under the stars.

No upper age limit (except on certain late July-August sessions). Main Camp has no additional requirements and is suitable for all campers.

We have successfully introduced a music therapy program, designed by Professor Petra Kern (who literally wrote the book on music therapy) and first delivered to Camp by one of her recent graduates. Videos were taken of participants before and after each session. Eye contact by campers with one another and with staff was significantly greater after the bonding experience of shared music – especially with campers on the autism spectrum who are characterized by social dysfunction. Since then we have repeated and increased the program. In 2016, we had two music therapists.

We are implementing an informal animal assisted therapy program, with guidance from Professor Audrey Fine (who, again, literally wrote the definitive book on the subject). Beginning with cats and dogs (including a dog with one leg missing – a disability to which our campers quickly and easily relate), we now have chickens and a pig and expect to have rabbits and possibly sheep soon.

We have created raised garden beds and an orchard, which many of the campers enjoy. This gives us the opportunity to teach the relationship of plants, sun, soil and water to the food we eat, and connects them to nature (a connection often lost in our modern high-stress world). Some even participate actively in our composting activities and understand the cycle by which compost is created and returned to the garden.

Our sensory tipi allows campers who are overstimulated to relax and reestablish their balance and harmony. This is especially valuable at bedtime when one camper is disturbing others.

We incorporate a work-study program into the schedule of many and provide valuable work-experience for them.

Our general supervision ratio is three campers to one counselor with one-to-one supervision available as required at extra cost. Our policy is to accept virtually all campers, regardless of difficult behaviors. To this end, our number of one-to-one campers has increased steadily over the years, as the public recognizes this important and unusual offering.

Population(s) Served

Outdoor Adventure Camp is camping at its finest and is great for the adventurous and independent camper. Campers sleep in tipis on camping cots or sleeping mats. Located just a short walk from Main Camp, Outdoor Adventure Camp is nestled in the redwoods with opportunities to explore the great outdoors through uniquely crafted expeditions. You’ll experience the 80+ acres of Camp Krem that is rarely seen by any other camper. This camp is jam-packed full of adventures, which may include:

• Hiking
• Exploring
• Backpacking
• Climbing
• Archery
• Campfire Cooking Lessons
• Kayaking/Canoeing

Many of OAC’s activities can be physically demanding, like the three-day backpacking trip to the Pacific Ocean, sea kayaking and rock climbing. There is no strict age limitation to attend Outdoor Adventure Camp, however, participants must meet the following requirements:

• Excellent at listening and following directions
• Demonstrates appropriate behavior in community settings
• No tendencies to wander
• Physically capable of sleeping outdoors (tents, tipis, cots, sleeping mats etc.)
• Completely, or mostly, independent with toileting and personal hygiene needs (little to no assistance needed)
• Able to participate in physical activities such as sea kayaking, backpacking, rock climbing etc.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities

Travel Camp offers the experience of camp life on the road. Our campers visit some of the most beautiful and inspiring places California and the West have to offer.

Travel Campers spend the first night of camp at Main Camp and then hit the road for a session of sightseeing and adventure. Travel Campers sleep under the stars (weather permitting) on sleeping mats, or in tents, as some prefer. Travel Camp is a cooperative team environment in which the campers enjoy pitching in with camp setup, cooking, cleanup, vehicle packing, breaking camp, packing, and planning the next stop.

Each year, we visit six of the following destinations, as well as intermediate places along the way:

Yosemite National Park
Lake Tahoe
Donner Lake
Mt. Shasta
Mt. Lassen
Crater Lake
Sequoia and Kings Canyon
Zion National Park, Utah
Big Basin Redwoods State Park
Pinnacles National Monument
Big Sur
Angel Island in San Francisco Bay
Other State & Regional Parks

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities

We offer an event virtually every weekend of the year. About half are one-day trips and the rest are either two-day (starting on Saturday morning and ending Sunday evening) or three-day (starting Friday afternoon and ending Sunday evening). All of our trips are exciting and enriching opportunities for campers and staff alike to experience the great outdoors as well as the beautiful parks & attractions of California and beyond!

Past trips have included: sports games and events, concerts and music festivals, ice skating, movies, bowling, Disney on Ice, House of Air, the Exploratorium, California Academy of Sciences, the Monterey Bay Aquarium, pumpkin patches, museums, live theater and many more!

We offer longer travel trips several times each year, including a Spring Break trip and a winter snow trip. Past destinations include Mexico, Hawaii, San Diego, Las Vegas, the Grand Canyon, Disneyland, Lake Tahoe, Apple Hill and Yosemite.

While participating in our Year-Round program, campers can assist in campsite preparation and breakdown, meal preparation, set up and clean up. During the overnights at Camp Krem, activities include swimming, archery, music, dance, hiking, nature walks, arts and crafts, themed events, movie nights, talent shows, games, animal care, gardening etc.

Whether we are spending the weekend having fun at Camp Krem in Boulder Creek or out and about on a trip, we focus on community integration, appropriate behavior in social situations and daily living skills.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities

One weekday evening a week, independent campers and their counselors meet to enjoy a pizza together, go to the movies, go bowling or to a dance. The Club decides what to do the following week.

Using email, newsletters, Facebook and other social media, we keep in close contact with our Campers, staff and families.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities

Our many programs for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities support our main mission: Providing respite to parents, families and others who are care-givers to this population, and who require a break from the important and often taxing responsibilities of caring for dependent and vulnerable people. By providing respite for these important care-givers, we improve the lives of everyone involved, from the harried moms and dads, brothers and sisters and other relatives who must provide care, often 24/7 to those with special needs who can benefit greatly from being away from home and in a new and stimulation environment that develops their independence, self-confidence and friendshiips.

Population(s) Served

Camp Krem offers online programs each day, ranging from large "dance parties" of up to 100 to one-on-one sessions between our clients and our staff, giving parents and families of our campers a few hours of respite each day, and allowing our campers to remain in contact with their friends.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities
People with learning disabilities
People with intellectual disabilities
People with learning disabilities
Caregivers
Families
Parents
People with intellectual disabilities
People with learning disabilities
Caregivers
Families
Parents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children and adults with disabilities enrolled in Summer Camp

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities

Related Program

Main Summer Camp

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric relates to our three summer programs, described above, and demonstrates increased success in fulfilling our mission.

Number of camper-days provided to children and adults with disabilities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric relates to our three summer programs, described above, and demonstrates increased success in fulfilling our mission.

Total number of fields trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric refers to the combined number of field trips during Summer Camp, plus separate weekend field trips, across our three summer programs.

Number of enriching activities offered at camp

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Over the last three years, we've added animal care, composting, Junior Counselor program, music therapy, animal-assisted therapy, tipis, rock climbing, archery, and day camp for neurotypical children.

Total number of permanent program and administrative staff

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Current program staff = 4 and administrative staff = 4. This metric relates to our three summer programs, described above, and demonstrates increased success in fulfilling our mission.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The CZU wildfires of August 2020 have forced us to focus on rebuilding. This may be a five year process. In the meanwhile we are developing online programs to fulfill our mission and are preparing for in-person programming as soon as it is safe.

In order to provide much needed respite to families, we work with one of the most vulnerable populations in society – individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. We promote independence, self-reliance, and self-discovery, which leads to improved self-confidence, sociability, and happiness. In so doing, we provide much needed respite for parents and families – often their only respite in the year.

We have a profound impact on the children and adults we serve by providing them “an opportunity to be themselves" – typically for the first (and often only) time in their lives. Normally constrained by parental and school hopes, demands and expectations, our campers find their time with us to be transformative.

Over the next three to five years, we intend to rebuild our main camp and to steadily improve our program and expand our enrollment. We believe we are good at what we do (a view shared by professionals, parents, and children). However, we now reach less than 2% of our local serving area.

Rebuilding of Main Camp will take time and money. We are developing a large fundraising program, and are working with state and Federal agencies for assistance, as appropriate.

In the meanwhile, our online programing continues to expand.

We want to reach as many children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities as we can. At our base at Camp Krem, we intend to increase our enrollments our existing facility in the Santa Cruz mountains, by expanding capacity. We will do this by a new capital program, increased public relations and marketing, heightened recruitment, and successful fundraising that will support our program. Tentative discussions have begun to open similar programs in other geographic areas.

We will continue and expand our efforts at State and Federal levels to protect and enhance the rights and benefits available to his population, and are already members of State and Federal working groups.

We have a long-term strategy in place and a board of directors committed to it. As a result, we are in the process, step by slow step, of implementing that strategy, to the great potential benefit of our vulnerable and wonderful population.

We have a committed board of directors, consisting of experienced educators, recreation specialists, and commercial people (including one banker, one actuary, one private equity fund manager, three lawyers, two MBAs, an MPH and the President of the San Francisco Autism Society, as well as three parents of children with I/DD). Most have previous and impressive board experience elsewhere, in both the non-profit and commercial worlds. We are in the process of strengthening our board even more.

We have a sound balance sheet (more than $1m in equity), a strong (and increasing) cash balance, positive cash flows, and virtually no debt. Our rebuilding efforts will be demanding.

Until the pandemic, our revenues were increasing steadily. Now we are developing a new budget that will require considerable effort, as many critical items are still unknown.

Fund raising activities are active.

We have an excellent reputation (established 63 years ago), and the respect of regional centers, government officials, our clients and their families, and the communities we serve.

We have a strong, well established networks, including state regional centers, parent support groups, state and local agencies and the general community. We have tens of thousands of happy campers, their parents, families and neighbors who know us and support our efforts.

Until the pandemic and fire, we measured our progress by increased head-count, increased camper-days, increased services increased event locations, and the recent provision of free transportation with 10 pick-up points along four major routes. Since founding, we have served an estimated 15,000 children and adults for more than 220,000 days and nights. By all measures we are improving our outreach and our services in support of our mission.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Post session interviews with parents and campers,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Our feedback indicates we are serving the needs of our clients and fulfilling our mission.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

CAMPING UNLIMITED FOR THE DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CAMPING UNLIMITED FOR THE DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED

Board of directors
as of 12/30/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Alex Krem


Board co-chair

Janet Von Der Linn

Marsh & Mc Lennan

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/30/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/30/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.