Central City Hospitality House

Fighting for the Soul of the City since 1967

aka Hospitality House   |   San Francisco, CA   |  www.hospitalityhouse.org

Mission

Hospitality House is a progressive, community-based organization located in San Francisco's Tenderloin Neighborhood, Sixth Street Corridor, and Mid-Market Area that provides opportunities and resources for personal growth and self-determination to homeless people and neighborhood residents. Our mission is to build community strength by advocating policies and rendering services which foster self-sufficiency and cultural enrichment.

Ruling year info

1967

Executive Director

Joe Wilson

Main address

290 Turk Street 2nd Floor

San Francisco, CA 94102 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-6171319

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Homelessness continues to be San Francisco’s most vexing social challenge. Despite a low unemployment rate and an improving economy for people with means, an affordable housing and cost of living crisis mean that times are getting even tougher for those experiencing poverty and homelessness. The San Francisco Point-in-Time Count conservatively estimates approximately 7,499 individuals without housing in San Francisco, as of January 2017. Approximately 3,680 homeless people reside in the Tenderloin and South-Of-Market Area (SOMA) neighborhoods served by Hospitality House. Of the more than 25,000 client visits to Hospitality House each year, the number one need is housing. Nearly 50% of community residents seeking services are homeless adults, with the other half generally housed in single-room-occupancy (SRO) hotels or other marginal living situations. Hospitality House is a community center supporting the needs of all residents in the neighborhoods we serve.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Arts Program

Founded in 1969, the CAP is the only free-of-charge fine arts studio for community artists and has long been recognized as an epicenter for the Tenderloin’s urban and outsider art movements. The CAP relocated to the burgeoning Mid Market neighborhood in 2010, serving as an anchor community arts organization in this growing arts district. For more than 1,800 artists a year, the CAP offers an outlet for creative self-expression and cultural connectivity that would otherwise be unattainable by offering neighborhood artist resources and materials to create, exhibit, and sell their artwork.

Population(s) Served

Since 2009, the CBP has been a hub for civic engagement, leadership development, and community building in the Tenderloin. CBP offers a range of healing, engagement, and skills-building opportunities for community residents who have experienced the trauma of poverty and disenfranchisement on the streets and in single room occupancy (SRO) hotels. Members learn the inner workings of City Hall, how to eat healthy with limited resources, and give back to their community through volunteerism, neighborhood activism, and board service. Residents connect through ongoing support groups, documentary film screenings, spoken word, and other community activities. Together, program staff and neighborhood residents explore new possibilities, tap unrealized potential, and strengthen individual and community resilience.

Population(s) Served

The Self-Help Centers are behavioral health-based community drop-in programs located in two San Francisco neighborhoods - the Tenderloin and the Sixth Street Corridor. Serving hundreds of people each day, both programs provide low-threshold access to a wide range of services, including peer support and resources, harm reduction-based substance use and mental health therapy, housing assistance, and case management, socialization activities, and access to basic amenities such as restrooms, phones, email, mail service, and respite from the streets.

Population(s) Served

Hospitality House’s Shelter Program provides temporary shelter and support services to more than 700 single adult men each year, with 25 extended-stay shelter beds and five emergency mats dedicated for nightly use. Shelter staff provide individualized case management that supports residents in overcoming whatever obstacles are standing between them and permanent stable housing.

Population(s) Served

Hospitality House Employment Program is designed to provide high quality support to individuals who face multiple barriers to employment by implementing four basic program components: Assessment Tools, Employment Preparation, Job Development/Placement, and Retention Services. The ERC also provides job-seekers with the ability to conduct job-searches via the internet, compose and print resumes, make job-related phone calls and send faxes.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Hospitality House is a grassroots organization that applies community-based solutions to social and economic justice problems in San Francisco. Our programs work together to reach people at different stages in their lives, whether it is a need for temporary shelter, housing, employment support, cultural activities, health services, or opportunities to have a voice in the community. Our holistic approach reaffirms community members' sense of self-worth and ability to achieve their full potential. Of benefit to all San Franciscans, Hospitality House’s work ultimately saves the city money by alleviating the strain on city resources, such as emergency room care, law enforcement, and incarceration, while improving the Tenderloin, Sixth Street Corridor, and Mid-Market neighborhoods.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Central City Hospitality House
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Central City Hospitality House

Board of directors
as of 10/19/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Jeanie Bunker

Independent Contractor

Term: 2013 - 2022


Board co-chair

Michael Hampton

Community Member

Term: 2013 - 2022

Monique Zmuda

former Deputy Controller - City of San Francisco

Brad Cerutti

HAVAS Worldwide

Michael Hampton

Community Member

Jesse Johnson

Community Member

Maria Rocchio

Wells Fargo

Elaine Go

Epsilon

Dana Issac

US Dept. of Education

Kelley Cutler

Coalition on Homelessness

Paul Boden

Western Regional Advocacy Project

Amber Cavarlez

Institute on Aging

Marissa D'orazio

Arrow Events

Jeanie Bunker

eCommerce

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No