Goodwill Industries of Southern California

Transforming Lives through the Power of Work

aka Goodwill Southern California   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  www.goodwillsocal.org

Mission

Transforming lives through the power of work, Goodwill Southern California serves people with disabilities or other vocational challenges by providing education, training, work experience and job placement services. Our Goodwill provides a continuum of employment-related services for vulnerable job seekers–those with disabilities and/or vocational disadvantages. For over 100 years we have served all people, but especially those considered the most difficult to serve due to disability, education, language, life- and work-skills deficits. Every year, our network of programs and services reaches about 35,000 people seeking not charity, but a chance, and places around 5,000 in good jobs. But Goodwill is not just about numbers. We're about people--and life transformation.

Ruling year info

1935

President and CEO

Mr. Patrick McClenahan

Main address

342 N. San Fernando Road

Los Angeles, CA 90031 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-1641441

NTEE code info

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Economic Development (S30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Job Training & Placement Services - Ending Unemployment for Vulnerable Job-seekers

Goodwill's network of programs and services to vocationally disadvantaged job seekers reach more than 30,000 people every year. We complement the work of other social service agencies with our experience and expertise in employment, and have been doing so for the past 100 years. We operate 4 County/City-funded America's Job Centers of California, 3 Goodwill/privately funded Career Centers, and programs focused on serving people with disabilities, disadvantaged youth and the re-entry population. For over a century we have served over one million job seekers in So. California and placed tens of thousands in good jobs. Our approach is simple: Connect job seekers with employers. Sometimes, the process takes a while because the people we serve often have enormous barriers to employment. Our staff provides case management and career counseling to help vulnerable job seekers meet individual career goals. Resources include career goal assessments, pre-employment assistance e.g. housing referrals, career counseling, case management, GED classes, soft skills workshops, training in short-term certification courses, work experience, support services such as transportation assistance and help with professional clothing, job placement, and follow-ups.

Most of the people we serve from our 30,000 sq. mile service area (Los Angeles County north of Rosecrans, and all of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties) could be described as the working poor - engaged in multiple jobs to provide for their families. We also offer programs for disconnected military veterans, persons with disabilities, people with a history of incarceration, and at-risk youth.

Over the years, we've incorporated more high-touch services to vulnerable job seekers resulting in better career-oriented job placements. Over the past 3 years, we have enrolled and graduated more than 1500 people in short-term certificate training at no cost to them, giving them opportunity for stable, career-oriented jobs with sustainable wages. To illustrate the impact of training, in just the first 6 months of 2016, we trained 700 job seekers with a resulting wage gain from placements of $30-million. Goodwill's partnership with Northrop Grumman, City of Palmdale and Antelope Valley College is a good example of our sector-focused work, which we are increasingly doing to benefit job seekers and to address the skills gap in manufacturing. Goodwill developed/customized curriculum to meet the needs of Northrop, and helped Antelope Valley College qualify to receive training funds, engaged other stakeholders (EDD, local agencies) to refer eligible job seekers to Goodwill for pre-screening, and created remedial pathways for job seekers who fail to meet math/reading proficiency. We pre-screened 705 candidates and enrolled 91 in training. Forty have been hired by Northrop or another aerospace/manufacturing employer after training.

Other portions of our service program include:
Contract Services-jobs competitively contracted with local businesses that provide training and work experience for people with developmental disabilities and other disadvantages.
Food Services-provides culinary training and work experience for persons with various employment challenges in our cafeteria, while providing good nourishment for employees and trainees at reasonable prices.
Environmental Services (secure document shredding, computer & e-waste recycling, full service custodial and landscaping services)-provides jobs/training for people with disabilities and other vocational disadvantages.
Retail Service Training-our stores provide jobs and training opportunities for employees working to overcome various barriers to employment.
Retail Services, Contracts, and Environmental Services all provide jobs while bringing in revenue to help fund our workforce and career development programs.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Veterans

Where we work

Accreditations

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) 2014

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) 2021

Awards

Goodwill Southern California’s Global Career Development Facilitator (GCDF) program recognized as an ‘exemplary practice’ 2011

CARF

4-Star WorkSource Center and 4-Star OneSource Youth Opportunity Center 2011

City of Los Angeles, Community Development Department

Affiliations & memberships

National Rehabilitation Association 2011

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, At-risk youth, Ex-offenders, Veterans, Homeless people

Related Program

Job Training & Placement Services - Ending Unemployment for Vulnerable Job-seekers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Though we have 5 target populations, we serve all jobseekers who walk through our doors.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, At-risk youth, Veterans, Ex-offenders, Homeless people

Related Program

Job Training & Placement Services - Ending Unemployment for Vulnerable Job-seekers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This refers to the number of participants who receive intensive job placement services with an individualized success plan.

Number of persons earning industry-recognized certifications/credentials

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, At-risk youth, Ex-offenders, People with disabilities, Homeless people

Related Program

Job Training & Placement Services - Ending Unemployment for Vulnerable Job-seekers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1 Continue to be a leading provider of quality training & employment services for people with the most significant barriers to employment. Serve 86,000 vocationally challenged people in SoCal over next 3 yrs.

2 Grow quality job placement in growth industries from 5,500/year to 8,000 in 2019. Refine/implement comprehensive program design with measurable impact on persons with disabilities & ensure inclusiveness & sustainability.

3 Provide quality work experience to approx. 3,000 at-risk youth, persons with disabilities & vocationally disadvantaged over next 3 yrs.

4 Increase number of job seekers receiving certificates & credentials. Goal: 6,500 over 3 yrs.

5 Expand mobile services to maximize outreach to job seekers throughout territory.

6 Expand large-scale strategic partnerships creating customized training for job seekers with focus on sector employers. Expand/implement apprenticeships/career pathways.

7 Maximize environmental &sustainability efforts throughout organization.

Provide job seekers skills training, paid work experience & placement to stable, career-oriented jobs with livable wages.

Specialized sector-focused training & increased partnerships—A 16-wk. accelerated training program in partnership with Northrop-Grumman & Antelope Valley College enables participants to earn an aerospace mfg. college credential. 20 units of credit are built into the credential so they can continue their education post-program. Interviews with local employers such as Northrop Grumman and Lockheed Martin are guaranteed to grads, who are eligible for entry-level jobs paying $15-$18/hr. After several years they can earn as much as $25/hr. This program has waiting list of 1,000+.

Opportunity for “left behind” persons—With the City of L.A. we work on a Skid Row pilot project to house & place homeless to transitional jobs. Partners focus on rapid housing. Goodwill provides job prep & placement. Key strategy: placement to Goodwill jobs offering work experience in a supportive environment. 26 of 31 homeless participants placed in the 1st 3-months. Soon to expand to the San Fernando Valley & So LA.

Over the past century we have served more than one million job seekers in Southern California and placed tens of thousands unemployed men and women in good jobs. Our approach is simple: connect job seekers with employers. Sometimes the process takes a while because the people we serve may have enormous barriers to employment requiring time, support and resources. Our staff provides case management, career counseling, guidance and direction to help job seekers meet individual career goals. Resources include career goals assessment, pre-employment assistance with housing and other barriers, GED classes, soft skills workshops, career training in high-demand careers, work experience at a Goodwill business or external employer, job application and interview assistance, career placement, support services such as transportation assistance and help with professional clothing, job placement, and 6-month follow up.

Our network of programs and services to vocationally disadvantaged job seekers reach over 30,000 people every year. We complement the work of other social service organizations with our experience and expertise in employment, and have been doing so for many decades. Our territory extends 31,000 sq. miles from all of Los Angeles County (excluding the beach cities – Long Beach, Redondo Beach, etc. – north of Rosecrans Blvd.) to all of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. Within this diverse community, we provide services out of several career centers (privately and County/City-funded), programs for veterans (including one onsite at Fort Irwin Forward Operating Military Base), and several sites where we offer services for people with disabilities, disadvantaged youth, and persons with incarceration histories. Lately, we have begun to mobilize some of our services, equipping frontline staff with mobile devices and deploying them where our target population are located.

In 2016 we accomplished the following:

32,523 Individuals served
27,942 People accessed our basic services including hiring events, job listings in career resource centers, computers for resumes, printing, job search assistance and supportive services (career clothing, transportation assistance, etc.)
4,581 Individuals received intensive services, including career counseling, case management, job training and placement and retention support
1,236 People received industry-recognized certificates/credentials at no cost to them
4,568 Individuals placed to good jobs in the community
2,594 Individuals with disabilities served
1,265 Re-entry participants served (self-reported)
1,092 Youth provided mentoring, homework help, job preparation and career counseling
18,306 Unemployed and under-employed persons served
3,985 Homeless persons served

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We provide employment services to individuals with barriers to employment, low wage earners and dislocated workers. While our strategic populations include disconnected youth, justice impacted, unhoused individuals, individuals with disabilities and veterans.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Goodwill Industries of Southern California
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Goodwill Industries of Southern California

Board of directors
as of 11/5/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Laurence Midler

CBRE

Term: 2022 - 2021

David Amar

William Blair & Co

Donald Crumrine

Flaherty & Crumrine (retired)

Michael Fong

Los Angeles Community College District

Drucilla Garcia-Richardson

Manufacturers Bank

Diana Ingram

Oracle Consulting

Kathleen Johnson

Law Office of Kathleen C. Johnson

Jack Kaufman

Kaufman, Miller & McAndrew

Jessica Lall

Central City Association

Nancy Limon

Reyes Coca-Cola Bottling

Larry Midler

CBRE Group, Inc.

Thomas Murnane

Arc Business Advisors

Paul Reiner

Deloitte Consulting LLP

Daniel Rendler

Southern California Gas Company

Morgan St. John

Peter Starrett

Freeman Spogli

Susan Stromgren

Bank of the West (retired)

Terry Takeda

Triple T&S Enterprises

Richard Villa

TCW

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/05/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/05/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.