Camp Fire,Central Coast Council

Light the fire within

aka Camp Fire Central Coast of California   |   Arroyo Grande, CA   |  http://www.campfirecentralcoast.org/

Mission

Young people want to shape the world. Camp Fire provides the opportunity to find their spark, lift their voice, and discover who they are. Camp Fire builds caring, confident youth and future leaders.

Ruling year info

1969

Principal Officer

Mr. Kenneth D. Miles CFRE, CNE

Main address

PO Box 1279

Arroyo Grande, CA 93421 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Camp Fire USA Central Coast

XXX

EIN

95-1661096

NTEE code info

Boys and Girls Clubs (Combined) (O23)

Leadership Development (W70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In Camp Fire programming, Youth who have discovered their “sparks" -- their skills, personal attributes and inner-passions -- and have adults' support in developing them are less likely to become one of the negative youth statistics; teen pregnancy, gang violence or a school dropout. Camp Fire youth don't just survive, though; they thrive. According to the Thrive Foundation for Youth, youth in Camp Fire Thrive programs are more likely to:

• Achieve higher grades
• Attain better school attendance rates
• Demonstrate social competence
• Lead healthy lifestyles
• Volunteer to help other people
• Provide sound stewardship of the earth and its resources
• Have a sense of purpose

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Camp Natoma

For over 70 years, Camp Natoma unique rustic experience for children and youth takes place in the Adelaida hills where everyone sleeps "under the stars." This summer resident camp offers environmental hikes, swimming, archery, drama, cooking, arts and crafts, singing and much more. Children and youth fall in love with the unique experience of Camp Natoma and often become Counselors in Training.

Population(s) Served

Camp Tacanneko is operated by volunteers. The 40 year old day camp is held for one week in the summer in Arroyo Grande. The children are busy with new activities every hour from art and crafts, swimming, dramatic play, and outdoor skills. The week concludes with camp performaces for parents.

Population(s) Served
Population(s) Served
Population(s) Served

Where we work

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Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In reviewing our Promise, vision and our rich heritage we have several primary goals for 2018-2023. We have many challenges in the market place to grow our organization. Our staff and board are prepared to meet them with a teachable spirit, a collaborative approach, filled with enthusiasm and desire to see our youth, volunteers and staff Thrive. We have many tasks to accomplish in the future with major goals;

1. Create and implement a plan of sustainability
Our challenge is to create a sustainable plan that makes the necessary changes to organizational knowledge, resources, and abilities with the goal of helping our organization to function more smoothly and to better fulfill its mission". Increasing staff size, expansion of fee for services, school contracts, camp expansions, additional day camps are programs and services paid for by those participating. Our goal is to determine, try and execute these new avenues of sustainability.

2. Established Sustained Partnerships
Develop donor, foundation and business relations with those that have a mutual mission and vision. To develop strategies that donors agree with, that engage them and inspire them. Donors' sparks and skills become known because we know what makes them “tick". And that a relationship is built upon mutual respect where confidence flourishes and our donors become our focus.

3. Increase children and youth participation
To be cost effective with our resources, we must serve more children. By the very nature of our organization, we want to serve more children and youth. Our heritage is rich in meeting the needs of children and families. It is time to be bold and try new ways to reach youth in their neighborhoods, schools and community. We cannot afford to do business the same way.

4. Outdoor Education and Camping Facility
Build or acquire an Outdoor Education Center and Camping Facility for year-round programming making Camp Fire the local leader in Outdoor Education.

5. Institute the THRIVE philosophy into all operations and programming of the Council
The THRIVE methodology includes strategic thinking with a growth mindset; that is a belief that abilities and personality grow with challenge. Having a growth mindset allows people to approach challenge with effort, trying alternative strategies and seeking help. THRIVE includes utilizing our measurement tools, responding to them and implementing their discoveries for student participants, adults and staff.

Camp Fire's core purpose is to help youth prepare for life, now. Our approach is not one-size-fits-all. Every kid is unique; every family is unique. Camp Fire understands and meets them where they are. We help them each find their path, their passion, their sparks.

Camp Fire offers programs in three broad areas:
• Out-of-School-Time Programs
• Teen Service and Leadership Programs
• Environmental and Camp Programs

Our Five Critical Outcomes

All Camp Fire programs emphasize at least five critical outcomes for adolescents:
1. Forming positive relationships
2. Learning decision-making skills
3. Engaging in fewer risky behaviors
4. Participating in fewer antisocial behaviors (including bullying and Internet bullying)
5. Achieving significantly higher school performance



Our Six Thrive Indicators

These outcomes directly correlate to the Thrive Foundation's “Thrive Indicators," or it's “Six Cs":
1. Caring
2. Character
3. Competence
4. Confidence
5. Connection
6. Contribution

Step-it-Up-2-Thrive

In 2014 the THRIVE philosophy was implemented throughout the council and the Step-It-Up-2-Thrive methodology in Central Coast middle and high school Camp Fire programs.

The 2017 Program Quality Assessment, PQA, determined the following suggestions for professional youth development.

Planning and Reflection

The skills of making plans and learning from the past can help youth succeed in school and in life. These skills are tied into what brain scientists call executive functions and play an important role in directing attention to tasks and decision making that connects with consequences.

Youth Voice

Providing young people with chances to make decisions about their activities and how they carry them out can improve motivation and buy in, and more importantly, offering choices in the solace of a youth program space gives youth a chance to practice for the bigger choices they'll make outside of the program.

The year 2017 concludes the implementation of Camp Fire's 3-year Strategic Plan that stated two major goals:
1. Increase children and youth participation
The Strategic plan stated: “It is time to be bold and try new ways to reach youth in their neighborhoods, schools and community. We cannot afford to do business the same way." And secondly;
2. Institute the THRIVE philosophy into all operations and programming of the Council
“The THRIVE methodology includes strategic thinking with a growth mindset; that is a belief that abilities and personality grow with challenge. Having a growth mindset allows people to approach challenge with effort, trying alternative strategies and seeking help."

Last year Camp Fire Central Coast served 2,000children and youth, at 80% increase from 2014. Our efforts in 2017 to increase participation and introduce Thrive concepts was highlighted in two major areas; Camp Natoma and our Youth Leadership programs at middle schools.

We elevated the Camp Natoma Director's position in 2017 to full-time status. The result of this investment yielded an increase of 36% from the previous year for a total of 900 campers, with many more campers enjoying Camp Natoma for the first time, and for some, their first camping experience ever.

In recent years, Camp Fire has acquired new evidence-based curriculum, targeted for middle school students, constructed on the principals of Thriving, which Camp Fire has coined; Thrivology. The methodology is based of four principals; 1. Discovering one's passions (Sparks), 2. Being teachable (Mindset), 3. Developing a plan of growth knowing that it is OK to adjust, and 4. Reflect on our experiences and learn from them.

In 2015, in our efforts “to be bold and try new ways to reach youth" we invited 7 McKenzie students, unfamiliar with Camp Fire, to come to the office after school to be a part of an experiment in Thrivology. Since that experiment, Camp Fire has been invited into middle schools in Lucia Mar, Santa Maria Bonita and Guadalupe school districts serving 723 students and teachers new to Camp Fire in AVID and ASES classes.

The year 2017 concludes the implementation of Camp Fire's 3-year Strategic Plan that stated two major goals:
1. Increase children and youth participation
The Strategic plan stated: “It is time to be bold and try new ways to reach youth in their neighborhoods, schools and community. We cannot afford to do business the same way." And secondly;
2. Institute the THRIVE philosophy into all operations and programming of the Council
“The THRIVE methodology includes strategic thinking with a growth mindset; that is a belief that abilities and personality grow with challenge. Having a growth mindset allows people to approach challenge with effort, trying alternative strategies and seeking help."

Last year Camp Fire Central Coast served 2,000children and youth, at 80% increase from 2014. Our efforts in 2017 to increase participation and introduce Thrive concepts was highlighted in two major areas; Camp Natoma and our Youth Leadership programs at middle schools.

We elevated the Camp Natoma Director's position in 2017 to full-time status. The result of this investment yielded an increase of 36% from the previous year for a total of 900 campers, with many more campers enjoying Camp Natoma for the first time, and for some, their first camping experience ever.

In recent years, Camp Fire has acquired new evidence-based curriculum, targeted for middle school students, constructed on the principals of Thriving, which Camp Fire has coined; Thrivology. The methodology is based of four principals; 1. Discovering one's passions (Sparks), 2. Being teachable (Mindset), 3. Developing a plan of growth knowing that it is OK to adjust, and 4. Reflect on our experiences and learn from them.

In 2015, in our efforts “to be bold and try new ways to reach youth" we invited 7 McKenzie students, unfamiliar with Camp Fire, to come to the office after school to be a part of an experiment in Thrivology. Since that experiment, Camp Fire has been invited into middle schools in Lucia Mar, Santa Maria Bonita and Guadalupe school districts serving 723 students and teachers new to Camp Fire in AVID and ASES classes.

Financials

Camp Fire,Central Coast Council
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Camp Fire,Central Coast Council

Board of directors
as of 4/29/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Lisa Hensley

Cal Poly University

Lisa Hensley

Shari McCarthy

John Hutchison

Maria Ramsey

Jeremy Thompson

Julie Tizzano

Wes Armstrong

Nora O'Donnell

Barbara Babka

Brian Kreowski

Heather Brough

Hillery Dixon

Alana Smith-Grove

Joseph Scott

Cint Francis

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No