GOLD2024

CHILDRENS BUREAU OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Be the Reason a Child Thrives

aka Children's Bureau of Southern California   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  https://www.all4kids.org/donate/

Mission

Protecting vulnerable children through prevention, treatment, and advocacy.

Ruling year info

1926

President & CEO

Ronald E. Brown Ph.D.

Main address

1910 Magnolia Avenue

Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-1690975

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Kindergarten, Nursery Schools, Preschool, Early Admissions (B21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Prevention Services

Children's Bureau's prevention programs work to create an environment where child abuse, maltreatment, and neglect simply do not occur.

We offer comprehensive child abuse/neglect prevention services in Los Angeles and Orange County, that are designed to build stronger families and communities by reducing risk factors and increasing Protective Factors. Services focus on families with children ages birth to five and include child development, parent education, home visitation, infant health, parents'/children's support groups, linkage and referral for additional services, and more.

In addition to direct services, we also work to prevent child abuse by building the capacity of peer organizations through training programs and leadership of the LA County Child Abuse Prevention Councils and create pathways for civic engagement and systems change through our place-based initiatives including the MCI Network and Network Anaheim.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families
Parents
Low-income people

Children's Bureau's Mental Health program targets young children, adolescents, and their families in Los Angeles with the goal of eliminating psychiatric conditions that impair the child’s functioning. Services include: individual therapy, group therapy, family therapy, and parent education via outpatient, wraparound and day treatment programs. We aim to help children and families involved, or at risk of involvement, with the Dept. of Children and Family Services to build healthy parent-child relationships, empower families and prevent abuse.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Low-income people

Our Foster Care & Adoption Program provides a continuum of care for families through the foster/adoption process. The program is designed to support vulnerable children in developing permanent, safe, and loving relationships. Services include recruiting and training Resource Parents; receiving and matching children with a Resource and/or Adoptive Family; providing and monitoring supervised visits; conducting pre-adoption home studies; and helping families through the adoption process. Support services are also offered to provide extra help through the foster/adoption journey. Adoption and Promotion Support Services provide families with case management, mentoring, support groups, mental health therapy, and linkage to resources. Relative Support Services provide case navigation to kinship caregivers who have stepped in to care for a relative when the county has separated him/her from his/her biological parents.

Population(s) Served
Foster and adoptive parents
Foster and adoptive children

Where we work

Awards

Best Places to Work 2022 2022

Los Angeles Business Journal

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

CHILDRENS BUREAU OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CHILDRENS BUREAU OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Board of directors
as of 06/04/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Matt Wilson

Oaktree Capital Management

Term: 2021 - 2023

Surendra Jain

Applecare Medical Group

Marilyn “Mindy” Stein

Tikun Olam Foundation

Marc Washington

Uplifting Results Labs, Inc

Lisa Gritzner

LG Strategies

Chris Jackson

Canyon High School

Ricci Ramos

Riot Games

Amanda Ruch

Capital Group

Janie Schulman

Morrison & Foerster LLP

James St. Aubin

MUFG Union Bank

Michael Traylor

Traylor Brothers, Inc.

O. Jacob Bobek

CBRE

Steven Moore

Brentwood Associates

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/30/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/04/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.