PLATINUM2024

HAMBURGER HOME

Lifting you up

aka Aviva Family and Children's Services   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  www.aviva.org

Mission

Hamburger Home d/b/a Aviva Family and Children’s Services (Aviva) is a nonprofit, non-sectarian 501(c)(3) organization. Aviva believes every child and every family in our Los Angeles community deserves the chance for a brighter future. For 108 years, Aviva has flourished based on our ability to address our clients urgent needs and the most pervasive issues in our communities. We offer compassionate support, therapeutic services, and guidance to at-risk children and families. Aviva provides a continuum of care from prevention, to intervention, and intensive treatment to 3,200 individual clients, impacting 6,400 children, family and household members annually. We are dedicated to improving children’s lives, creating cohesive families, resilient communities, and a more equitable society.

Ruling year info

1935

President/CEO

Ms. Amber Rivas

Main address

7120 Franklin Avenue

Los Angeles, CA 90046 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Aviva Center

EIN

95-1693616

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Foster Care (P32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

For several thousand children and families throughout Los Angeles County, every day is a struggle made worse by the fact that they cannot access the help they need to move toward a brighter future. While no two circumstances are alike, Aviva’s clients face multiple sources of disadvantage and discrimination. Aviva’s clients are predominantly young (98% 0-20 years); poor (family income =/ 87% BIPOC.) Intersectional vulnerabilities pose significant health disparities and further marginalization. Mental health struggles are among the many preventable differences in burden of disease that Aviva’s clients experience. For Angelenos whose needs are underestimated and unmet, we provide the care they need. Aviva’s programs mitigate social, emotional, and economic barriers and disrupt pernicious cycles of neglect and abuse for greater health, security and stability. We help to build stronger, more cohesive families for resilience and permanency.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

We offer compassionate care to children & families with therapy and case management services. Culturally sensitive, trauma-informed care is provided through prevention & early intervention therapies at Aviva's Wellness Center at Hollywood High School; L.A. Unified School District Onsite Mental Health Services Centers; and in Juvenile Justice Programs.

Services are provided in the community or in the home, individualized for each family’s needs & preferences with a variety of Evidence Based Practice (EBP) models including:

Alternatives for Families-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (AF-CBT)
Individual Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (Ind. CBT)
Managing & Adaptive Practices (MAP)
Multi-Disciplinary Teams (MAT)
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT)
Seeking Safety (SS)
Stepped Care
Therapeutic Behavioral Services (TBS)
Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

Care services are designed to promote healing, greater health and resilience, and ultimately, to transform clients' lives.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Parents
Families
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Integrated programming to secure safe, loving homes for children (from birth to age 21) in Los Angeles County, treatment for children who are high-risk/high-need (Intensive Services for Foster Care - ISFC), Relative Support Services (RSS) and Relative Home Assessment Services (RHAS).

Aviva trains and certifies foster parents & homes for children who are among the most vulnerable & neglected in L.A. County. By limiting caseloads, Aviva’s social workers provide weekly home visits, diligent oversight & support for foster children & their families. We offer guidance & education with on-call support 24/7. Often, our foster parent(s) wish to adopt the children placed in their care. As a licensed adoption agency, Aviva makes dreams come true for these children & parent(s). For foster children with emotional & behavioral challenges, our Intensive Services for Foster Care (ISFC) program utilizes specially trained foster families & professional teams to meet each child’s treatment needs.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Caregivers
Families
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Wallis House, Aviva’s residential program provides interim housing, therapeutic services & case management for unhoused mothers & children with an annual capacity of 30,000 beds. Wallis House is a home offering respite, refuge, healing, renewal & hope to as many as 36 families / 85 individuals, 365 days & nights a year.

In addition to secure shelter, residents receive three nutritious meals daily; clothing & personal necessities; mental health services; financial literacy, parenting, fitness & wellness workshops; enrichment programs for kids; access to technology. Case management provides access to childcare, education, employment resources, financial & legal assistance, while assisting residents in securing & transitioning to permanent housing. In partnerships with Kaiser Permanente & Saban Community Clinic residents receive onsite primary & pediatric preventive care & dental services.

Wallis House experiences are transformative in promoting health, resilience & brighter futures.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Parents
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

When children and families are in crisis, we support their healing through intensive community-based services. Our multidisciplinary teams employ strength-based approaches that empower families to lead in their own treatment and stabilize their home environments to preserve family unity.

The following four key components are fundamental to Aviva's approach to Crisis Intervention which is designed to cultivate stability for our community's most vulnerable children:

Community-based care
Team-based, multidisciplinary services
Individualized family plans
Collaborative, family-centered treatment

Aviva's Crisis Intervention program offerings include Outpatient Clinical Services (OCS), Full Service Partnership (FSP), Intensive Field Capable Clinical Services (IFCCS), and Wraparound Services.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families
Parents
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

All Children All Families Seal of Recognition 2023

Human Rights Campaign

Affiliations & memberships

The Alliance for Strong Families & Communities - Member 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants counseled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Caregivers, At-risk youth, Parents, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Refers to individual clients directly served across all four programs. Years referenced: FY 2023 (7/1/22 - 6/30/23) FY 2022 (7/1/21 - 6/30/22) FY 2021 (7/1/20 - 6/30/21) FY 2020 (7/1/19 - 6/30/20)

Number of clients in residential care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adolescent parents, Single parents, Young women, Homeless people

Related Program

WALLIS HOUSE - INTERIM SUPPORTIVE HOUSING

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since Oct, 2019, Aviva's residential program has provided Interim Supportive Housing for unhoused mothers & children. 36 families = 36 mothers + 49 kids receive shelter, food & care, 365 days/yr.

Number of bed-nights (nights spent in shelter) provided to unhoused women and children* in interim supportive housing program (shelter, food, case management, therapeutic care, support services, basic resources)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Economically disadvantaged people, Out-of-home youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Foster and adoptive children

Related Program

WALLIS HOUSE - INTERIM SUPPORTIVE HOUSING

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Current maximum capacity at Wallis House is 36 families/day-night. In 2023 avg. occupancy 35 mothers & 52 kids/day-night = 28K+ bed-nights provided.

Percentage of clients had fewer overall emotional and behavioral symptoms by the end of treatment (source: )

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Parents, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Source: Pediatric Symptom Checklist PSC Survey. Years referenced: FY 2023 (7/1/22 - 6/30/23); FY 2022 (7/1/21 - 6/30/22) ; FY 2021 (7/1/20 - 6/30/21); FY 2020 (7/1/19 - 6/30/20)

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Over the next four years, we will deepen our trauma-informed services for families, expand our role as a leader and partner in the community, and integrate justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion into our culture and daily work. Aviva will also focus its attention on investing in the training and leadership development of staff, succession planning, and financial sustainability.

Aviva provides child- and family-centered services in Los Angeles County:
Our programs and services target marginalized children and families in Los Angeles County. We take a child- and family-centered approach, wherein the needs and interests of our clients inform and drive our approaches to programming and individual treatment.

Aviva's people and community are its greatest strengths:
Relationships are at the core of our service delivery model and our success as an organization. Client voices inform individual treatment plans and organizational priorities. Staff members work day in and day out to actualize our mission. Board members provide critical strategic oversight and ensure we have the resources to sustain and grow our work. Community partners help to widen the continuum of services available to our client children and families.

Aviva delivers a new paradigm of integrated supports:
“Integration" here spans a variety of internal and external linkages and information-sharing. Internally, we aim to ensure a seamless system of support, so that clients move across the continuum of supports as their care plan requires. Externally, we are focused on growing and deepening partnerships with outside providers – from physical health, housing, workforce development and other disciplines – to ensure current and former Aviva clients have access to the full range of services they need.

Aviva has a meaningful and measurable impact on the lives of children and families:
Our organization understands the importance of data for program effectiveness, employee performance and financial sustainability. We seek to promote a culture of data-driven decision-making and believe that, embedded in the data, are meaningful stories that highlight Aviva's impact in the community.

Cultivating alliances and leveraging relationships across the nonprofit, foundation, civic, and private sectors is key to Aviva’s success:
Although some core services provided in Aviva’s four main program areas are funded through contract revenue, philanthropic support is critical to sustain programmatic reach and maximize outcomes for our clients. In addition to the funding Aviva receives from foundation, private, and corporate donors, we partner with community organizations whose strategic cooperation, leadership, in-kind donations, time investment, and expertise enhance our impact. We work diligently to nurture existing relationships, identify and develop new donors, and re-engage former supporters in current initiatives. We actively pursue a host of funding streams, both contractual and philanthropic, to fortify organizational stability, programmatic excellence, and to achieve our future objectives. We exceeded fundraising goals in 2020-2022 and leveraged resources to achieve impressive results, and know that continuing to build new relationships and nurture lasting alliances, are essential to our ability to realize current opportunities and navigate the future with agility.

In addition to Aviva’s more than century-long history serving the greater Los Angeles community and a proven track record of success, our capacity for meeting our organizational objectives is founded on leadership noted for their breadth of expertise and depth of professional training and our 140 member-strong, multicultural, multi-ethnic team. Our staff draw from extensive work experience and education while their demographics reflect the composition of the communities and clients we serve. Aviva’s long history as a well-respected non-profit agency in Los Angeles with a resilient infrastructure, and extensive programmatic experience enhance our ability to recruit and hire the most qualified people in their respective fields.

Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (JEDI) at Aviva
Aviva’s commitment to justice, diversity, inclusion and equity is essential to how we interact with our clients, providers, team, and the community at large. As we work to develop and deliver highly impactful programs to improve our clients’ lives and our communities at large, we strive to inspire mutually respectful relationships, foster safe environments, and cultivate just, diverse, inclusive and equitable systems. We are committed to respect, include, support, and advocate for BIPOC, people who identify as LGBTQ, people of all genders, faiths and abilities.

Consistent with our founding dedication to responsiveness, Aviva has anticipated opportunities and responded to unexpected, serious challenges by developing and executing effective solutions. Following is a summary of some of the most serious issues we have recently confronted and impactful adaptations implemented to overcome them.

Homelessness
Based in part on data from the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority in 2018, Wallis Annenberg Center was re-envisioned to provide shelter to unhoused transitional-aged youth in L.A. County Service Planning Area 4 where the population of unhoused youth was exceptionally large and growing. Further investigation reveals a profoundly unaddressed need in support for a large subset of the unhoused population, mothers with children. In October 2019, Aviva’s historic residential facility renovation and program redesign is rededicated as Wallis House to serve these unhoused women and children with Interim Supportive Housing. In addition to safe, clean shelter, residents receive case management focused on childcare, employment, education, financial and legal needs; assistance in securing and transitioning to permanent housing; broad therapeutic care including nutritious food; basic resources; mental health services; personal, educational, vocational development workshops; enrichment programming for children. Through a partnership Kaiser Permanente & Saban Community Clinic, residents receive onsite pediatric preventive, primary medical and dental care. By 2022, capacity at Wallis House had nearly doubled increasing the number of beds provided from 16,000 to more than 30,000 annually. Wallis House currently serves some 86 individuals (36 women and 50 children) 24/7, 365 days/year, offering transformational experiences that foster more stable, healthy, productive, and happy lives.

Pandemic Response
Aviva’s response to the public health and economic crises the pandemic wrought exemplifies our agility in evolving and leveraging resources to meet our clients’ needs. In addition to launching an extensive virtual service delivery system to ensure access to mental health services, Aviva successfully secured and leveraged government funding from the Paycheck Protection Program at the Federal Small Business Administration and the Federal Department of Health & Human Services, to fund critical initiatives, hazard pay, and prevent personnel layoffs while also and expanding access to fundamental resources to all clients such as food, baby and personal care, clothing, household and school supplies from our Family Resource Center.

Justice, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion
As an increased focus on police violence, a public health crisis that exacerbated already tenuous economic situations in client communities generated new urgency to address the grave inequities that perpetuate cycles of suffering, Aviva renewed a commitment to justice, diversity, inclusion and equity with our staff, clients, providers, and community at large.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

HAMBURGER HOME
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HAMBURGER HOME

Board of directors
as of 02/27/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Jonathan Werner

Partner/Attorney at Law, Alvarado Smith

Term: 2022 - 2023

Amber Rivas, M.S.W.

President & CEO Aviva Family and Children’s Services

Lola Levoy

President, Beverly Hills Escrow

Dianna Eisenberg

Executive Director, Hollywood Media District

Candace Foy Smith, Esq.

Deputy District Attorney, City of Los Angeles (former, retired)

Bruce Andelson, Esq.

Partner/Attorney at Law, Greenberg Glusker LLP

Genevieve Haines

Founder/Consultant, Haines & Co. Public Relations

Danette Meyers, Esq.

Deputy District Attorney, City of Los Angeles

Nicole Swain

President, Private Banking, Bank of Southern California

Mark Caffee

Strategic Communications Consultant, Mark Caffee Social Purpose Consulting

Yvette Verastegui, Esq.

Public Servant & Former, Los Angeles Alternate Public Defender), Los Angeles Superior Court

Sari Megan Kern, R.N., M.B.A.

Founder/Entrepreneur, Alpha Data Strategies

Patrick Monaghan, J.D., M.B.A.

Chief Legal Officer,General Counsel, Head of Privacy & Corporate Secretary, SADA Systems

Adrian Breitfeld, M.B.A.

Vice President for Finance and Administration/CFO, American Jewish University

Greer Saunders

Philanthropist

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/23/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/10/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.