Convalescent Aid Society

aka CAS   |   Pasadena, CA   |  www.convalescentaidsociety.com

Mission

Convalescent Aid Society, located in Pasadena, California, a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation, is dedicated to improving the quality of life of our clients by providing the loan of medical equipment for in-home use.

Ruling year info

1959

Executive Director

Mr. Mark Waterson

Main address

3255 E Foothill Blvd

Pasadena, CA 91107 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-1782304

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As healthcare access has increased in recent years, so have the costs associated with it for many individuals. Traditional services such as Medicare and private insurance now cover more people than ever but often provide fewer benefits to covered policyholders than they did a decade ago. Many times, our clients come to us because they have been denied a needed piece of equipment through other means. Even when individuals have insurance or healthcare coverage, they are unable to afford essential parts of care. Many times, medical equipment will be the first thing that is cut as families budget for care. Besides providing mobility, another problem that aging citizens face is losing independence. Seniors attempting to “age-in-place” may not be able to do so because they lack necessary mobility and assistive devices that make staying in their homes feasible.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Loan of Durable Medical Equipment (DME)

Eligible individuals may borrow one or more items of durable medical equipment such as a wheelchair, walker, hospital bed or bath safety item, if CAS has the item available.  Clients may borrow items for as long as needed, and then return the items to CAS.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people provided assistive technology

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Chronically ill people, Older adults, Seniors, People with physical disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to COVID and fewer local residents seeking ambulatory assistance, our reach was limited in 2020. We expect to reach and then overtake past totals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Convalescent Aid Society (CAS) seeks to provide needed durable medical equipment (DME) to area residents at no cost, no time restriction and with minimal hassle.

Our goal is to help every area resident acquire the medical equipment they need so that they can retain (or regain) their independence. Often, one or two pieces of DME – like a commode or a shower chair – can be enough to enable someone to remain in their home, surrounded by their family in a comfortable, familiar and peaceful setting.

Besides the financial benefit of loaning DME to locals, our services also reduce stress. In fact, we are often the “easiest part” for families to navigate in an increasingly complicated healthcare maze. By making the process easy for clients to borrow needed medial items from us, families can concentrate their effort and energy in other areas to help a loved one. Keeping our services free continues to be a priority.

Finally, CAS recognizes the role that reuse can play in helping reduce our impact on the environment. For every piece of DME that can be reused, we are able to reduce the use of materials needed for manufacturing, emissions from production and transportation of items, and landfill space when feasible items are discarded before their usable life is over.

Convalescent Aid Society is a vital part of an interconnected healthcare ecosystem in the area. Each hospital in our service footprint lists CAS in their discharge planning documents, and social workers/discharge coordinators all refer patients (and their families) here as a simple way to help ensure a safe and timely exit from the hospital. We have cultivated these relationships by providing service to thousands of patients in recent years so we are recognized as a trusted resource for these professionals.

One key strategy for making sure enough equipment is available has been the creation of a series of “Remote Donation Sites” in our service area. These partner agencies serve as easily accessible hyper-local spaces for residents to donate equipment for use by our clients. The more than two dozen partner agencies and businesses serving in this capacity have been instrumental in helping CAS collect record amounts of DME to put back into service locally.

The final strategy that we have employed to help reach our goal of providing equipment to any resident who needs it is by diligently being stewards of our resources. This objective is met in two main ways: first, by verifying residency (which ensures that borrowed equipment stays in the community) and second, by following up with families on a regular basis to make sure that items on loan continue to be needed. If we discover that a borrowed item is not serving a client, but has not been returned yet, we can encourage families to return the equipment to our warehouse so that it can be redeployed to another individual in need.

For an agency with 30,000 pieces on loan, we have a modest loss-rate on borrowed items with between 6%-7% of items ultimately lost. Considering that we collect no deposit, this is a considerable feat.

In the past five years, we have more than doubled the number of items loaned out on an annual basis. This speaks to our capabilities to meet demand and shows that the strategies mentioned previously have been successful.

For the next increase in service delivery, CAS is looking to expand our reach to new communities that are not being served by our operations and do not have a similar agency available in their area. Because of the efficiencies of our delivery model, there is a great opportunity to replicate these processes in a new location, thereby helping additional families that have no other options.

Mainly, by collecting equipment from residents that currently have no other donation option, we’ll quickly be able to build out an inventory of DME that will be ready to loan out. Our capability for service delivery in a new area also depends on building and maintaining partnerships with area hospitals, orthopedic surgeons, home health care agencies, Geriatric Care Managers, long-term care facilities and other health care providers. We feel confident that we’ll be able to build out a network comprised of these pieces because the services that CAS provides (for free) allow each one of these segments to better focus on their specialty.

By enabling independence for our users, we often hear that they experience greater happiness, faster recovery and reduced instances of hospital re-admittance or further injury. Because all of our loaned items are provided free of charge, for each item we loan out, we’ve saved the community the retail cost of that item. In the last fiscal year, the retail cost of the items CAS put into service in the area would have been roughly $2.8 million.

Besides the cost-savings of our service, another accomplishment of our model is that for every item loaned out, we redirect a piece of equipment from the landfill and/or prevent strain on the environment due to manufacturing. In fact, since our equipment is loaned out an average of four times during its usable life, the impact on the environment is multiplied by a factor of four. This means reduced drain on minerals, pollution from manufacturing and transportation and packaging.

Next up for Convalescent Aid Society is opening up our valuable service to more residents in the Los Angeles Area. We are exploring the addition of a second location, which would allow CAS to replicate our service model to a whole new group of people.

Financials

Convalescent Aid Society
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Convalescent Aid Society

Board of directors
as of 5/3/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. David Jones

Retired

Term: 2019 - 2021

Bobbi Abram

Pasadena City College

Elisabeth Browne

Compass Lexicon

John Calderone

Olympia Medical Center (retired)

Renee Concialdi

Right at Home, Pasadena

Linda Dea

Logix Federal Credit Union

Mark Gamble

Hospital Association of Southern California

John Higgins

High Point Academy (retired)

Denise Jackson

Pacific Clinics

Lorie Judson

Chin Family Institute for Nursing - CSULA

Carol Kirby

Retired

Eileen Koons

Huntington Hospital Senior Care Network

Kimberly Moss

Pegasus Home Health Care

Irene Parades

IP Premiere Insurance Company

Mark Rice

Retired

Marilyn Smith

Law Offices of Marilyn M. Smith

Wenjay Sung

Global Podiatry Partners, Inc.

Philip Swan

Griffis Residential

Mary Trinh

Murchison and Cummings, LLP

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/03/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data