Junior Achievement of Southern California, Inc.

ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT THROUGH EDUCATION

aka JASOCAL   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  www.jasocal.org

Mission

JA SoCal inspires and prepares young people to succeed in a global economy. Volunteers from the professional sector help youth explore the business of life through hands-on dynamic programs that teach skills related to managing money, starting a business and entering the work-world.

Ruling year info

1994

President & CEO

Dr. Lester McCabe

Main address

6250 Forest Lawn Dr

Los Angeles, CA 90068 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-1799192

NTEE code info

Primary/Elementary Schools (B24)

Secondary/High School (B25)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Junior Achievement addresses the gaps in educational experiences that otherwise leave today's youth unprepared for the real world of work, financial responsibilities, leadership and innovation. School systems are under constant pressures to provide consistent, standardized and core academic curricula, reducing the practical opportunity for teachers to directly incorporate real world business and financial applications into their lessons. Students overwhelmingly report a lack of relevancy in their school work, and while drop-out rates have improved somewhat in Southern California, our four-year high school graduation rates remain lower than state and national averages. Students need exposure to basic financial education and career planning to understand the impact and importance of staying in school and learning how to empower their own economic futures and how to have an impact on the communities they live in.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

JA Finance Park

Students come to the JA Finance Park facility at our JA SoCal headquarters location in Los Angeles. Each student is assigned a JA Finance Park life scenario including a job, income level, educational history, marital status, children, debt load and credit score. Volunteers assist students in using JA table based budget experience software to create and manage a monthly budget based on their assigned life scenario. Students visit real-life branded storefronts within the park to research potential costs of items, and they make purchasing decisions.

Population(s) Served
Students

JA provides in-classroom financial education enrichment programs throughout Orange County. JA trains volunteers from the professional sector to go into K-12 classrooms and teach nationally evaluated curriculum about financial competency, entrepreneurship and work readiness. All JA programs are activity-based, dynamic, interactive and based on real-world applications.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

JA provides in-classroom financial education enrichment programs in Los Angeles, Ventura, Santa Barbara, San Bernadino, Riverside and San Luis Obispo counties. JA trains volunteers from the professional sector to go into K-12 classrooms and teach nationally evaluated curriculum about financial competency, entrepreneurship and work readiness. All JA programs are activity-based, dynamic, interactive and based on real-world applications.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Changes to the learning environment due to COVID-19 restrictions have significantly impacted our live in-person programming. We have pivoted our delivery model to continue programs in virtual formats.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Junior Achievement programs, designed by national experts in educational pedagogy, directly compliment standardized curriculum guidelines to provide age-appropriate exposure and inspiration to students from kindergarten through 12th grade around topics related to managing money, entrepreneurship and businesses innovation, and preparing for a lifetime of job preparedness. Our programs support local and state efforts to engage the next generation in building a solid economic foundation for growth, stability and competitive edge in a global financial arena. We serve predominantly schools with students from families that have very high rates of participation in free and school lunches, an indicator of serving low-income students. Our programs directly provide the education and encouragement to reduce inequalities in access to good jobs, access to financial markets, and access to business leadership through innovation and entrepreneurship.

Junior Achievement of Southern California trains volunteers from the local business community to go into classrooms and provide nationally evaluated financial and business education curriculum that inspires students and awakens them to the limitless possibilities before them if they are willing to try. JA serves elementary students grades kindergarten through 5th grade, providing fun, dynamic, activity based lessons that integrate concepts of civic engagement, planning for financial costs and responsibilities, and business and educational leadership in the community. At the junior high school and high school level, JA programs are more in-depth and volunteers are trained to provide more in-depth lessons and more sophisticated conceptual understanding to students through structured but exploratory and hands-on programming.

We are capable of meeting our goals by managing a network of partnerships with over 300 local schools and over XX local businesses, giving us access to over 4,000 volunteers per year and reaching over 58,000 students in any given year, with XX hours of instructional programming. We are able to accomplish these goals with a lean staff of 22 employees.

Junior Achievement of Southern California has reached over 750,000 students in the Southern California region in the last 10 years, including programs at many of our elementary schools returning year after year to impact students not just once, but at each grade level with age-appropriate and cumulative lessons. Some of our standout programs include providing over 7,000 middle school and high school students with in-depth personal financial literacy programming including our “JA Finance Park” where students are challenged to establish a budget and follow it in a day-long simulation where they are assigned an imagined adult profile including career, salary, existing debt, existing family, and a multitude of real-world responsibilities. We also serve over 300 students with JA Company Program, walking them step by step through the process of establishing a new company, forecasting, marketing and managing sales, and evaluating and presenting their own success and learning to judges via a JA Student Entrepreneurship Competition. We also serve over 7,000 students a year with JA Job Shadow, exposing youth to the multi-faceted array of jobs available within any one business or industry, through partnerships with local companies, inspiring students to see beyond simple stereotypes and envision pathways for satisfying local employment and to prepare themselves academically to be able to compete and succeed in future careers. We currently have plans to increase our return programming at local schools and school districts so that even more of our students get year over year exposure to JA concepts and lessons, and to develop partnerships with innovative and cutting edge educational models that incorporate business and financial literacy within the fabric of the central curriculum itself.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Junior Achievement of Southern California, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Junior Achievement of Southern California, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 06/15/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Frank McMahon

McMahon Consulting Services

Term: 2021 - 2023

John Tipton

Allen Matkins Leck Gamble Mallory & Natsis LLP

Frank McMahon

American Discovery Capital

Steve Dolcemaschio

Sam Sheth

VerityPoint

David Freitag

CBRE

Tom McCarthy

McCarthy Cook & Company

Maynard Brown

Crenshaw Sr High School

Paul McGunnigle

Howard Building Corporation

John Adams

Gensler

Avo Amirian

Pinnacle Communication Services

Brian Anderson

Marsh & McLennan, Inc.

Frida Bank

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Maria Beckman

Bank of America

Joe Brancucci

Financial Partners Credit Union

Ben Braun

NBCUniversal Film & Entertainment

Sandra Burns

Ernst & Young

Kevin Caputo

RBC Wealth Management

Nelson Castro

AIG Individual Retirement

Gregory Craig

Griddy Energy

Carole Curb Nemoy

Curb Entertainment International

Greg Davis

Sandy Dunleavy

Bank of the West

Robert Flick

Law Offices of Robert Flick

Chris Garcia

Banc of California

John Gatti

Manatt Phelps & Phillips

Bill Glinski

City National

Paul Goldstein

Southern California Gas Company

Channing Grigsby

Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors

Daphne Helms

Capital Group

Lynn Hopton

Columbia Management

Stephanie Ivy

Goldman Sachs Asset Management

Monique Johnson

Beneficial State Bank

Cynthia Jordan

Comerica Bank

Ann Kono

Thomas McCarthy

McCarthy Cook & Company

Regina O'Neil

KPMG LLP

Erik Orbach

Whittier Trust

Todd Orchard

IBM Communications Market

Abhilash Patel

Thermal

Trey Pruitt

Ares Management

Carol Richards

Union Bank

Scott Sauer

Deloitte & Touch LLP

Michael Shepherd

The Shepherd Group

Scott Sachs

Premiere Financial Search

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/9/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data