PLATINUM2024

MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF LOS ANGELES

Moving Mental Health Forward

Long Beach, CA   |  www.mhala.org

Mission

Mental Health America of Los Angeles (MHALA) works to ensure that people with mental health needs achieve meaningful, healthy lives in their communities.

Ruling year info

1958

President and CEO

Dr. Christina Miller

Main address

3633 East Broadway

Long Beach, CA 90803 USA

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EIN

95-1881491

NTEE code info

Community Mental Health Center (F32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

MHALA’s programs support wellness, resilience, and community connections to ensure that those we serve thrive in their communities and live meaningful lives.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mental Health America of Los Angeles

Mental Health America of Los Angeles has been a pioneer in mental health service advocacy, innovation, and training for nearly a century. Last year we were able to help more people than ever and provided integrated services to over 19,000 individuals with mental health needs and limited financial resources.

Our integrated services include:
• Mental healthcare
• Medical healthcare
• Employment
• Homeless outreach and drop-in centers
• Housing
• Education and financial programs
• Linkages to substance abuse services
• Wellness, resilience, and life skills programs
• Veterans and transition-age youth services

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Veterans
Unemployed people

Where we work

Accreditations

CARF 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of jobs created and maintained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Unemployed people, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Mental Health America of Los Angeles

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Unemployed people, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Mental Health America of Los Angeles

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of homeless participants engaged in mental health services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mental Health America of Los Angeles

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people, Veterans, Unemployed people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people, Veterans, Unemployed people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people, Veterans, Unemployed people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

MHALA works to ensure that people with mental health needs achieve meaningful, healthy lives in their communities. Our goal is to reduce barriers to services, increase resilience and independent behavior, and improve our community.

MHALA achieves impact in the areas of mental health, healthcare, homelessness and housing, employment, wellness, and training for the behavioral health workforce, with special programs for Veterans and transition-age youth. MHALA is also a longstanding leader in public policy and advocacy.

MHALA program staff are trained in providing a variety of mental health services to our members. Our staff include licensed mental health clinicians from multiple disciplines, psychiatrists, social workers, and nurse practitioners.

Case Management Services are provided to all members enrolled in MHALA programs. Personal care coordinators guide each member as they navigate through MHALA’s programs, services, and treatments. We meet our members where they are in their recovery process, using a whatever it takes approach. Our staff is fully committed to helping our members to achieve their goals by reducing barriers, identifying and meeting members’ needs, and facilitating their success.

Transition-Age Youth (TAY) Services help young adults ages 18 to 25, including those identifying as LGBTQ+, with mental health needs and severe emotional challenges to fully integrate into the community. MHALA uses a one-on-one approach, with a personal care coordinator working with each youth to create an action plan that addresses individual needs, including managing mental health needs and connecting with services, gaining employment, achieving educational goals, and maintaining secure housing.

Employment Services are provided to individuals with mental health needs by identifying options for individuals regardless of their barriers or where they are on the employment continuum. The comprehensive program provides job readiness skills, supported internships within the community, and supported employment within MHALA’s social enterprises, such as the Village Cookie Shoppe (villagecookieshoppe.com).

Veterans Services are provided to Veterans with mental health needs and their families by providing a coordinated effort to secure or retain housing, essential medical care, mental health counseling, and employment assistance. Our personal care coordinators work with Veterans to meet urgent needs that may cause homelessness and support them with long-term solutions such as job training and placement, healthcare, financial assistance and education, and other family needs.

Health and Wellness Services are provided by nursing personnel who address the needs of members who are co-diagnosed with mental health and chronic health conditions. Services include health screenings, health and nutrition education for self-management of chronic conditions, and other direct services and referrals. Nursing staff also operate within our outreach teams that provide intensive street services to homeless individuals.

Homeless Services include outreach, street medicine, day-use Drop-In Centers (for basic needs such as a hot shower, laundry, mail, food, etc.), and housing services. MHALA seeks to assist these individuals in obtaining and maintaining permanent housing. Our personal care coordinators are well-versed in the resources available in the community to provide linkages for additional service referrals.

Founded in 1924, Mental Health America of Los Angeles (MHALA) is one of Los Angeles County’s largest and most respected nonprofit mental health organizations with a long history of advocating for mental health equity. MHALA’s mission is to help people with mental health needs achieve meaningful, healthy lives in their communities. Celebrating our 100th anniversary this year, we have introduced many groundbreaking advancements in mental health and successfully reduced disparities in care for millions of Los Angeles County residents. Headquartered in Long Beach, California, with 27 locations throughout Los Angeles County, MHALA deeply understands and appreciates this region's diverse cultures and unique challenges. 

MHALA offers a full continuum of services, and our members can enter that continuum at any point — whether they are receiving street outreach to residing in permanent housing. Our diverse array of programs allows us to systematically address the needs of people living with mental health needs by providing flexible services that can be tailored to meet any member's needs.

As the needs of our community have continued to evolve over the years, MHALA has responded with an integrated and comprehensive service model. Our organization now assists nearly double the number of members (clients) as it did before the pandemic, supporting a total of 19,619 members. Last year, MHALA conducted outreach to 16,416 unhoused individuals, enrolled 3,203 members in integrated services, provided street medicine to 2,790 Angelenos, connected 6,624 to medical care, helped 2,258 secure permanent housing, distributed meals to 18,600 individuals and families, and made it possible for 575 members to become newly employed. All MHALA staff are trained to use trauma-informed and evidence-based practices, using a culturally sensitive lens to provide the highest quality of care.   

A large portion of our members are struggling with homelessness, substance abuse, and severe mental health issues at initial contact. Our clinical services aim to help members reintegrate into the community and live healthy, meaningful lives while also utilizing programs like our Wellness Center to prevent circumstances or relapses that could compromise their newfound employment, housing, or ability to care for themselves and their families. We are keenly aware that the best way to prevent homelessness, substance abuse, and severe mental health issues is to ensure that people have access to the tools, resources, and support they need to stay housed, employed, and remain mentally and physically healthy.

In the past, we focused our service provision primarily on the most at-risk individuals in our community (those who were experiencing homelessness or struggling with serious mental illness). While we remain firmly committed to our most vulnerable members today and have expanded these areas, one of the key lessons of the pandemic is that mental illness is not a binary phenomenon where someone either has a mental health disorder or does not. We have learned the importance of working upstream to recognize the warning signs and address the mental health challenges our communities are facing early on in an effort to prevent more severe situations from occurring downstream, like homelessness, unemployment, and substance addiction. 

Equity, diversity, and inclusion are embedded in everything we do. We've worked diligently to bridge service gaps for underserved populations, including BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) communities, Veterans, and transition-age youth. Nearly 80% of MHALA staff, 70% of its leadership team, and 50% of the board identify as BIPOC, and more than 25% of our staff have personal or family experience of poverty, homelessness, and mental or physical health challenges. MHALA is committed to ensuring representative leadership and decision-making at all levels of the organization.

Financials

MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF LOS ANGELES
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF LOS ANGELES

Board of directors
as of 06/02/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Raul Godinez

Law Offices of Raul E. Godinez, Inc.

Term: 2024 - 2027

Don Ford

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (retired)

Raul E. Godinez

Law Offices of Raul E. Godinez, Inc.

Kimberly Finney, Psy.D.

University of Southern California

Charles Lew

The Lew Firm APC

Silvano Merlo

Long Beach Courtyard Marriott Downtown

Susana González Edmond

Actum, LLC

Mary Ann Takemoto

California State University, Long Beach (retired)

Donnie Watson

Thelma McMillen Recovery Center at Torrance Memorial

David Ayala

Farmers & Merchants Bank

Mary Hennessy

Silver Branch Perspectives

Pamela Griffin

Bartz-Altadonna Community Health Center

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/2/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Native American/American Indian/Alaska Native/Indigenous
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/16/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.