World Vision, Inc.

Building a better world for children

aka WVUS   |   Federal Way, WA   |  http://www.worldvision.org

Mission

World Vision is a Christian humanitarian organization dedicated to working with children, families, and their communities worldwide to reach their full potential by tackling the causes of poverty and injustice. World Vision serves all people, regardless of religion, race, ethnicity, or gender.

Notes from the nonprofit

Our faith in Jesus Christ is core to who we are. As an expression of God's unconditional love for all people, especially vulnerable children, we serve alongside the poor and oppressed. We hope to live as followers of Christ by being active, visible bearers of God's love.

Relying on God's grace and Spirit, we affirm the truth of the gospel and our hope in Christ through our character, speech, actions, and in the signs of God's power at work in individual lives, in the communities where we work, and in all creation.

Ruling year info

1982

President

Mr. Edgar Sandoval

Main address

PO Box 9716 MS 216

Federal Way, WA 98063 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-1922279

NTEE code info

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

International Relief (Q33)

Christian (X20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a church.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Saving lives in the wake of disaster, World Vision stands ready to protect children and families by offering critical help within 24 to 72 hours of disaster. Our 37,000 staff in nearly 100 countries are committed to helping families rebuild. Creating Hope of today and tomorrow, World Vision is passionate about seeing every child break free from poverty and reach their God given potential. Our unique development model offers a full solution to the puzzle of poverty, enabling real and lasting change for children and families.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

International Programs

The Organization partners with families and communities around the world to find ways to overcome poverty, helping them obtain sustainable access to basic resources and services such as clean water, food assistance, agricultural training, healthcare, economic development, child protection, and other goods and services. One of the Organization's primary funding sources for this work is child sponsorship, through which the Organization's staff in impoverished communities seek to improve children's physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being through a relationship with their sponsorship donor. Additionally, the Organization responds to natural and man-made disasters to save lives and help restore livelihoods.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

The Organization works with local churches, ministry partners, teachers, business owners, students, and volunteers throughout the United States as they seek to serve distressed communities and neighborhoods in a variety of U.S. locations. This work is carried out in part through the Organization's network of product distribution centers, emergency and disaster relief efforts, and tutoring and youth development programs.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The Organization seeks to help government officials and the public gain awareness and take action on poverty and justice-related issues. World Vision advocates on behalf of children and the poor to increase understanding of issues, involvement in solutions, and prayer.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance

Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA)

Affiliations & memberships

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member

InterAction - Member

Christian Management Association (CMA)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of disaster survivors and refugees assisted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

International Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

More than 90 percent of natural disaster-related deaths occur in developing countries, where poverty and lack of resources exacerbate the suffering. WV works in many of these countries.

Number of people reached with improved water access

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

International Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Nearly 1,000 children under age 5 die every day from diarrhea caused by contaminated water, poor sanitation, and improper hygiene. We believe the global water crisis can be solved within our lifetimes

Number of people assisted with food security and resilience

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

International Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

One in 8 people in the world do not have enough to eat & are unable to grow enough food. In 2021 we used 105.3 million in food grants, including 163,172 metric tons of food supplies to feed the hungry

Number of microloan borrowers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

International Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

1.3 billion people worldwide are living on less than $1.25 a day. That’s why we facilitate savings groups, improve market development, and provide access to microfinance.

U.S. Funded Education Programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

World Vision U.S. funded education programs reached over 1.2 million children worldwide.

Number of practicing Community Health Workers as a result of the organization's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We have supported and trained over 184,000 community health workers in 46 countries and have reached 33.5 million people with disease prevention training, treatment and support.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

WVUS Call to Action
We are about growing God's kingdom. We do this by inspiring, empowering and enabling supporters to partner with World Vision and the most vulnerable communities, families, and their children to bring about Jesus' promise of fullness of life. (John 10:10)

WVUS Cultural Characteristics

1. Urgency (Job 29:11‐12)
2. Excellence (Colossians 3:23‐24)
3. Integrity (2 Corinthians 8:21)
4. Humility (2 Corinthians 4:7)
5. Unity (Ephesians 4:11‐13)

World Vision is an international partnership of Christians whose mission is to follow our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ in working with the poor and oppressed to promote human transformation, seek justice, and bear witness to the good news of the Kingdom of God.

We pursue this mission through integrated, holistic commitment to:

Transformational development that is community-based and sustainable, focused especially on the needs of children.

Disaster relief that assists people afflicted by conflict or disaster.

Promotion of justice that seeks to change unjust structures affecting the poor among whom we work.

Partnerships with churches to contribute to spiritual and social transformation.

Public awareness that leads to informed understanding, giving, involvement, and prayer.
Witness to Jesus Christ by life, deed, word, and sign that encourages people to respond to the Gospel.

Our Model for Implementing Programs:

Measurably improving child well-being is at the center of our approach to child and community development. This is our Theory of Change:

Problem: Poverty exists largely because of broken relationships.

Assumption: Children are not only a community's most precious resource, they are also central to addressing poverty overall. How a community treats its children will have major implications for its health and well-being overall.

Proposed Solution: In order to address poverty, we must work with children, their caregivers, and other stakeholders in the community to restore broken relationships and focus them on the sustained well-being of children.

Over the years, we've redesigned and refined our framework based on what we've learned from working and collaborating with children, families, communities and experts around the world.

We use a logical framework to describe program and project cycle management through six basic components: assessment, design, monitoring, evaluation, reflection and transition. Our principles and approaches describe vital elements that need to be in place in order to achieve our goal. Our approach differs depending on the problem we are addressing. We adjust our approach when it requires different interventions, recognizing that our approach to maternal health will be different than our approach to malaria.

To learn more about our capabilities and model for implementing programs, please visit our website at:

http://www.worldvision.org/about-us/how-we-work/our-model-for-implementing-programs

Poverty is complex and so are our solutions! Here are some of our results for 2021:

• Responded to 72 humanitarian emergencies in 52 countries, including the Haiti earthquake, Hurricane Ida, and the East Africa hunger crisis.
• Assisted 30.1 million disaster survivors, refugees and internally displaced people worldwide, beyond our COVID-19 response - 15.8 million of whom were children.
• Used over $40 million in private donations and $129 million in public grants for global disaster relief efforts.

In the hours of greatest need we accomplished the following:

• In Northern Ethiopia, more that 1.1 million people including 434,718 children were supported with clean water access, food supplies and safe spaces for women and children.
• In the month following the Haiti earthquake, 14,000 people received hygiene kits. 18,000 people received shelter supplies and 1,200 people received food vouchers.
• In East Africa Over 2 million people including nearly 1 million children received life-saving resources in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan and Uganda.
• After Hurricanes Eta and Iota we reached 346,033 people in Honduras with support in water, sanitation and hygiene; food security and nutrition; education; livelihoods; shelter; health; protection and more.
• Disbursed $613 million in microloans to 1 million hardworking people in 28 countries – impacting 1.6 million jobs and improving the lives of 5.2 million children!
• In the U.S. to help meet the need of 8.3 million children and adults impacted by the pandemic, we distributed over 24,000 Family Emergency Kits including a weeks worth of food for a family of five, hygiene and protective items and educational resources. 1.9 million Fresh Food Boxes were distributed through our partnership with the U.S. government's Farmers Food Box Program.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    World Vision is a Christian humanitarian organization dedicated to working with children, families, and their communities worldwide to reach their full potential by tackling the causes of poverty and injustice. Motivated by our faith in Jesus Christ, we serve alongside the poor and oppressed as a demonstration of God’s unconditional love for all people. World Vision serves all people, regardless of religion, race, ethnicity, or gender.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In 2021, World Vision conducted its largest-ever real-time learning (RTL) process. With insights from more than 3,000 staff in 56 countries, 500 external partners and more than 1,600 community members across six countries, World Vision is adapting to more effectively respond to COVID-19, as well as enhancing our preparedness for future epidemics. For more information, please click here: https://www.wvi.org/publications/report/coronavirus-health-crisis/agile-adversity-how-covid-19-changed-way-world-vision

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Social transformation starts with the building and nurturing of relationships among all partners. This includes World Vision staff and community members; members of different religious and ethnic groups, and local leadership and the community—including women and children, who are often left out of decisions that affect their lives. When we shift power through this social transformation, communities take full ownership of their future—establishing long-term social structures such as water committees, food marketing co-ops, parent-teacher associations, and community banks.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

World Vision, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

World Vision, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/13/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Dr. Joan Singleton

Arcadia University

Term: 2015 - 2022

Jim Bechtold

Forum

Leith Anderson

National Association of Evangelical's

Jerry White

The Navigators International

Joan Singleton

Arcadia University

Robert Abernathy

Halyard Health - retired

Larry Probus

Whitworth University

Edgar Sandoval

World Vision, Inc.

Noel Castellanos

Christian Community Dev Assoc. former president

Nicole Baker Fulgham

Charles & Lynn Schusterman Family Philanthropies

Michael Henderson

New Beginnings Church

Laura Whitley

Bank of America - Retired

John Jenkins

First Baptist Church of Glenarden

Vonna Laue

former EVP Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability

Kristin Anderson

WVI

Liza Hing

Former Director KeyBanc Capital Markets

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.