Mental Health, Crisis Intervention

The Whole Child

aka The Whole Child - Mental Health & Housing Services   |   Whittier, CA   |  www.thewholechild.org

Mission

The Whole Child's mission is to help families raise emotionally and physically healthy children and have a place to call home. We believe that not only does every child matter, but every aspect of the child matters - the whole child.

Notes from the nonprofit

88% of our expenses are directed to servicing at-risk communities.

Ruling year info

1959

Chief Executive Officer

Constanza Pachon

Main address

10155 Colima Road

Whittier, CA 90603 USA

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Formerly known as

Intercommunity Child Guidance Center

EIN

95-2031148

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Community Mental Health Center (F32)

Housing Expense Reduction Support, Rent Assistance (L82)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Whole Child's services focus on issues in four key areas: Child Behavior & Trauma, Family Homelessness, Child Neglect & Abuse, and Child Obesity. Mental Health: We help children develop coping skills and heal from distressing events through family, individual and group psychotherapy, crisis intervention, psychological testing, medication management and case management. Housing: We help families who are homeless chart a path our of their current situation through community-based housing, employment services, child care, money management and life skills training, and family mentoring. Parent Enrichment: We help primary caregivers develop nurturing parenting and communications styles through education parents in attachment, lactation and infant massage during our home visits, parenting groups, and access to other community resources. Nutrition: We help families adopt healthy lifestyles through nutrition workshops, school lunchroom design, and building awareness.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mental Health Services

Outpatient Services: Services include a comprehensive psychosocial assessment, individual, family and group psychotherapy. The outpatient services provide a structured nurturing therapeutic environment designed to promote successful home, school and community functioning by enhancing self-esteem, encouraging personal growth and development, and improving socialization skills within a group. Theoretical orientations for the implementation of therapeutic services include child centered theory, family systems theory, and strength based theory. Treatment techniques and interventions include, but are not limited to play therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, brief strategic family therapy, behavioral modification techniques, attachment therapy, trauma therapy, Gestalt Therapy, Parent-Child interaction therapy, sand tray therapy and art therapy.

Population(s) Served
Families
Non-adult children

School Based Mental Health Services: Comprehensive mental health services provided on-site at local schools in the community. The Whole Child partners with eight local school districts including South Whittier School District, East Whittier School District, Whittier City School District, East Whittier City School District, Los Nietos School District, Whittier Union High School District, El Rancho Unified School District, and Montebello Unified School District. Over 21 schools receive school-based mental health services from The Whole Child.

Population(s) Served
Families
Non-adult children

Crisis Intervention Services: When a child and/or family member is experiencing a crisis, which often occurs in the school, home and/or community, immediate assessment, triage and intervention is required. A master level therapist will provide a comprehensive crisis assessment to determine the level of therapeutic interventions required to stabilize the child and/or family member. The goal will be to stabilize the identified client in the presenting crisis situation preventing a more intensive level of mental health services such as hospitalization, removal from the home, expulsion from school, and/or police involvement. Thus, returning the identified client to the highest level of functioning and reintegrating successfully the client to the school, home and community setting. Crisis intervention services include eight to ten sessions. However, if the therapist is unable to successfully stabilize the crisis situation, planning with the family, school staff and/or collaborative involved will ensure a higher level of care appropriate to the crisis situation, i.e. intensive outpatient and/or intensive home based services.

Population(s) Served
Families
Non-adult children

Intensive Services: Full Service Partnership (FSP) – intensive in-home mental health services for children (birth to 15) and their families who are involved in multiple service systems such as Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), Probation, and Special Education. Participants in this program qualify for a higher level of care due to their mental health needs and history of inpatient psychiatric care and/or residential treatment care. Referrals are made by Department of Mental Health (DMH), schools, and other community agencies.
Family Preservation (FP) – mental health services for children and their families who are current participants of the DCFS Family Preservation Program.
Field Capable Clinical Services (FCCS) – mental health services for children and families needing more than traditional outpatient services. The majority of these services take place in the community such as in the home and at school. This program is also considered a “step down” service from FSP.
Multidisciplinary Assessment Team (MAT) – this is a comprehensive mental health assessment program for children recently detained by DCFS. Referrals are made by DCFS and DMH staff co-located at local DCFS offices. MAT assessments are conducted throughout Los Angeles County.
Specialized Foster Care Services: Comprehensive mental health services for children and adolescents currently involved with the foster care system in Los Angeles County due to issues of child abuse; referrals are made directly by the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS).

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
Families

Birth to Five Services: Programs are sequenced in phases, including: Early Identification and Referral; Diagnosis of Developmental and/or Emotional Issues; and Treatment (Four Levels of Service). Treatment protocols within Early Attachments cover a spectrum of therapeutic services for infants and toddlers, and can be offered to the parent alone or in conjunction with the child. They include: Child-Parent Psychotherapy: psychotherapy for children 0-5 years; The Incredible Years: training to teach parents effective parenting strategies that promote young children’s social and emotional competence, reduce problem behaviors, and increase positive and nurturing parenting; Parents as Teachers: home-based service to teach parents appropriate activities and educational development for their infants/toddlers; Positive Parenting Program: training for parents of children with challenging behavioral problems; and Infant Massage: relaxation techniques to reduce crying and help infants sleep more soundly as well as promote healthy bonding through physical interaction and verbal and nonverbal communication. Additional services include developmental screenings, and support groups for women with post-partum depression. Strong community partnerships exist with PIH Health, Beverly Hospital, White Memorial Medical Center, St. Francis Medical Center, local Head Start schools and High Schools.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
Families

Prevention and Early Intervention Services (PEI): Comprehensive short term mental health services utilizing evidence-based practices (EBPs) which are researched based and supported for their efficacy with children and families. The Whole Child is pleased to offer the following EBPs: Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Treatment (TF – CBT); Seeking Safety: Triple P Positive Parenting; Managing and Adapting Practice (MAP); Child Parent Psychotherapy; and Incredible Years.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
Families

Case Management Services: Children and families will receive an array of case management services, which will include interagency, and intra-agency consultation, communication, coordination and referral, ensuring access to resources. A range of areas in which resources may be beneficial to the client and family such as: school, recreation, social supports, finances, housing, transportation, parenting, therapy for others in the family, emergency assistance (financial), vocation, child care, substance use, legal assistance, etc. Case Managers are trained to use this tool in a manner in which it will promote a sense of support and connectedness to the agency, and in which the therapist and Case Managers can work together to empower the clients to address the needs identified and implement the services recommended.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
Families

Medication Support and Management: Upon completion of the psychosocial assessment and throughout the treatment process, it will be determined if a psychiatric evaluation will be scheduled for possible use of psychopharmacological treatment. A board certified licensed psychiatrist will conduct a comprehensive evaluation, establishing a positive relationship with the child and parent(s)/guardian, providing information on psychopharmacology, and on-going medication support and management.

Psychological Testing: Upon completion of the psychosocial assessment and throughout the treatment process, it will be determined if a psychological testing is indicated. Psychological testing can be instrumental in determining effective therapeutic goals or treatment interventions; determining diagnosis; assessing the level of cognitive functioning; ruling out psychosis; assessing developmental and educational deficits as well as strengths; and determining additional internal and external resources to meet client and family’s needs accordingly. The licensed psychologist will work with the agency’s multidisciplinary team, as well as community collaborative(s), i.e. schools, hospitals, etc., to gather history and/or data which will assist in determining methodology for further clinical assessment and treatment planning.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
Families

The Whole Child’s housing division is committed to keeping families together and addressing homelessness by providing permanent supportive housing. The primary goal of the Housing First Model is to reflect current best practices for family placement into the community towards housing permanency. Homelessness ends when the individual or family is stabilized in permanent, affordable housing, whatever that permanent housing type may be and whatever the support systems that must be in place to help them stay there. To achieve this goal, a multi-pronged approach to addressing family homelessness is utilized and focuses on four key areas of action: (1) a coordinated entry system; (2) housing interventions strategies tailored to needs of individual families; (3) linkages to local mainstream support systems; and (4) utilization of evidenced-based practices. A Community-Based “Scattered” Site Model involving several “clusters” of apartments and scattered apartments throughout Southeastern Los Angeles County (SPA 7) to end homelessness will be utilized.

Population(s) Served
Families
Non-adult children

The Parent Project: The Whole Child offers parenting groups for our community utilizing The Parent Project curriculum for parents of teens and Loving Solutions (Parent Project, Jr.) for parents of elementary school aged children. The Parent Project curriculum offers a strength based approach that supports parents in strengthening their relationship with their children by promoting healthy communication.

Population(s) Served
Families
Parents

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Center for Nonprofit Management Excellence Network 1998

Chamber of Commerce 1994

United Way Member Agency 1994

Best in Whittier for Mental Health Therapy 2016

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

New Parents Trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Parent Enrichment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We support the unique needs of infants through age 5 who are at-risk for developmental, psychological, behavioral, social or family challenges. We help educate parents and strengthen the bond.

Nutrition Workshops Held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We help families adopt a healthy lifestyle through nutrition education and physical activity with our Champions for Change - Healthy Communities Initiative.

Previously Homeless Families Housed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Housing Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We help families who are homeless, or on the brink of homelessness, chart a path out of their current situation into permanent housing.

Hours of Mental Health Therapy provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mental Health Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We help children and their families heal, develop resilience, and rebuild emotionally healthy lives.

Children & Youth Served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Whole Child served children age 0-15 and youth age 16-24 in FY18-19.

Families Served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Whole Child recognizes that in order to make a sustainable impact of the lives of children we must also provide support and services to stabilize the family unit.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We served more than 12,500 individuals through our mental health, housing, parent enrichment and nutrition services in FY18-19.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Our mission is to help families raise emotionally and physically healthy children and have a place to call home.

Develop and leverage strategic community and local business partnerships to cultivate stronger referral networks, increase public awareness about The Whole Child's services, provide more effective services to the communities and populations Continue to provide professional and leadership development opportunities for staff Expand the number of members of the board of directors—recruiting individuals with strategic skills and interests or from strategic industries Further expand and leverage the strong, positive reputation of The Whole Child's brand in order to increase opportunities to serve more clients in need, establish more beneficial partnerships, and secure funding Maximize public sector contracts Increase the number and amount of contributions of major donors through regular communication and relationship-building efforts. Increase the amount of donations from planned giving by helping board members and donors understand their investment options.

The strategic plan, and the initiatives and objectives detailed within it, provide a blueprint to guide The Whole Child's strategic development for the next three years. As a living document, the plan cannot account for the external factors that will no doubt alter the landscape of The Whole Child's work. While The Whole Child remains steadfast in its commitment to the goals laid forth in this plan, its Board of Directors, Executive Management Team and staff members will undertake a number of planning activities each year for the next three years in order to update and operationalize the strategic plan. As depicted in the graphic design, the strategic plan will serve as the guide for developing an annual operating plan, annual budget, organization chart and semi-annual reports.

The Whole Child is committed to rigorous evaluation and will use qualitative and quantitative methods to measure short- and long-term program results. The Whole Child will share information gathered and lessons learned to support progress in the field and inform policy and practices impacting children and families.<br/><br/>The Whole Child will share its expertise with service providers and policy makers, to scale its impact and will communicate its evaluation results via regional collaboratives, local, statewide and national conferences, and social media.

The Whole Child is an established leader in its field as a result of high-quality services delivered to at-risk children and their families and a record of achieving strong outcomes. In recent years, a number of significant multi-year grants from public and private partners has allowed TWC to expand and enhance programs and services and add new sites, thus strengthening its regional impact. In 2011 TWC began expanding supportive housing services aimed at families. In 2014, TWC was selected as a lead training agency by First 5 LA to implement Parents as Teachers, a home-based program that teaches parents how to support their young children's development. Also in 2014, we opened a new site at Whittier High School, delivering on-site services to improve mental health and build resiliency in teens; and TWC was selected as the sole Family Solution Center provider in SPA 7 by the LA Homeless Services Agency (LAHSA). In 2018, we were awarded a contract that will double our Parent Enrichment program which offers home visiting services including developmental screenings for children age birth to five years old.

Financials

The Whole Child
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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The Whole Child

Board of directors
as of 9/9/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Monica Alfaro Welling

Atheln, Inc.

Term: 2019 - 2021

Lyonel Alexandre

Community Business Bank

Corinne Munoz

Los Nietos School District

Robert Quist

Los Angeles Municipal Court

Alex Moisa, Esq.

Law Office of Alex Moisa

Janice Roodzant

Details Business Organizers

Gary Martinez

Ashwill Associates

Alphonsie Nelson, Esq.

Bassett, Discoe, McMains & Kargozar Law Offices

Thedora Nickel

The Capital Corps

Danelle Thomsen

AmeriNat

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Keywords

mental health, crisis counseling, therapy, emotional health, family counseling, parent education, housing, nutrition