Assistance League of Redlands

Transforming Lives - Strengthening Community

aka No   |   Redlands, CA   |  alredlands.org

Mission

Assistance League volunteers transforming the lives of children and adults through community programs.

Ruling year info

1941

President

Mrs. Leticia Cervantes

Main address

700 East Redlands Blvd. U-290 U-290, Redlands, CA

Redlands, CA 92373 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-2131653

NTEE code info

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Assistance League of Redlands proactive leadership team, in collaboration with our Marketing & Communications Committee and nonprofit partnerships, continues to address the issue of membership development and retention that will provide a more sustainable volunteer support for our chapter's demanding activities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Dental Center

Our full service Dental Center serves low income, under-insured, children and adults in the Redlands/ Yucaipa area through general dentistry and orthodontics.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Provides new school clothing, shoes and personal items to 1200 low income students from 23 schools in the Redlands/ Yucaipa Unified School Districts.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Assistance League volunteers from the Professional Women of Redlands Committee serve middle and high school students based on emergency hardships in their families. They provide Target Stores gift cards to shop for school clothing. Hygiene items and portable food are provided to Redlands Unified School District counselors and organizations that work with this age group. This enables them to address the immediate needs of their students.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Students

Assistance League volunteers holds an annual awards luncheon for the elementary, middle and high school students in the Redlands Unified School District with various disabilities. These students are recognized for the efforts they have made throughout the year. Each student performs with their class in front of peers and receives a gift and lunch.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with disabilities

The program provides scholarships to graduating senior women who have overcome a significant adversity in their life and are continuing their education beyond high school such as vocational school, junior college or a 4 year college or university. One scholarship is available at each of the 5 public high schools in the Redlands Unified School District.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adults

Assault Survivor Kits are provided to victims of rape, assault and physical abuse. They are given comfortable new clothing to wear home after being seen in the hospital. These items replace the humiliating paper gowns provided by the medical facility upon their release. Our “kits” represent a compassionate thought that others care during a very trying time. We partner with San Bernardino Assault Survivor Services to distribute these "kits" to hospitals for ready inventory as needed.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Assisteens Auxiliary provides toys for children during the holidays at an annual event.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children

This program passes on donations to other nonprofit organizations, not acceptable for sale or use in the Thrift Shop, Dental Center or other chapter programs.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

Assistance League of Redlands' Assisteens Auxiliary provides "tie" blankets to YouthHope Organization for distribution to their homeless demographic that ensures a warm "hug" at Christmas.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Ease the burden of economically disadvantaged families with children in public schools and increase the number of additional students invited to attend shopping sessions for school clothing and shoes through our nationally recognized Operation School Bell® philanthropy of 50 years.

2. Promote public awareness of our state-of-the-art, full service, low-cost dental clinic in partnership with Loma Linda University Dental School to increase oral care and hygiene services by dental professionals to under-insured children and families in the communities we serve.

3. Broaden our Adaptive Physical Education Awards Luncheon to provide additional awards recognition for sports achievement by children with disabilities, that preclude their involvement in regular team sports, at the middle and high school levels, as well as the elementary level, for their efforts to perform challenging physical entertainment in front of their peers and families.

4. Ensure the level of support and effectivity of our philanthropic programs by increasing membership at a rate of 5% annually, expanding community partnerships and outcome measurement evaluations.

5. Improve resource development to maximize revenues from our fundraisers and thrift shop which provide for the growth and sustainability of essential programs we have tailored to meet the specific needs of our focus demographic.

6. Expand Marketing & Communications to promote increased awareness of organizational activities through more effective use of chapter website, social media and email platforms, as well as printed publications.

1. Ensure the health and sustainability of our philanthropic programs that transform lives and strengthen the communities we serve by continuing an effective strategy of increasing new member recruitment by 5% annually, and retaining our volunteer membership levels through engagement opportunities and empowerment to succeed.

2. Continue to cultivate, promote and strengthen a collaborative network of program funding and referral support with Redlands and Yucaipa Unified School District teachers, special counselors and school administrators; program specialists in Redlands area hospitals; professional dental assistance from the Loma Linda School of Dentistry; Family Services, civic leaders; non-member community volunteers and local businesses, including partnerships with other philanthropic organizations through the Redlands Charitable Resource Coalition.

3. Promote our reputation of reliability and hard work, built over 60 years of dedicated service highlighted by Operation School Bell®, our national signature program, and our unique low-cost, full service dental center. This credibility with continue to grow our partnering network as a major component in sustaining our service to the community.

4. Encourage additional membership staffing of the chapter's Thrift Shop to improve revenues by increasing the volume of donations processed daily and customers service. Arrange for the transportation of estate donations to the Thrift Shop for sale.

5. Implement enhanced Marketing & Communication technologies that will allow us to better identify with our current demographic and develop connective relationships to promote and increase membership as well as support from the communities we serve.

1. A dedicated leadership team, a family of hard working volunteers and a strong network of community involvement that continually and successfully attracts new volunteers that support a sustainable membership base to ensure our philanthropic and fundraising goals are met. Our current membership development program motivates potential volunteers by engaging their support with our programs and fundraisers and membership referrals as an effective introduction to our organization. We have developed a committee structure designed to meet the schedule demands and interests of our community demographic that facilitates membership support.

2. Our solid fundraising base is sustained by unique and traditional events, and a recently expanded thrift shop operation which combined provides significant revenues from generational support that spans 67 years. Through our Operation School Bell and Dental Center programs, our chapter grant writing team has developed strong associations with regional grantors and private foundations that continue to generate consistent funding for these activities.

3. The chapter's leadership team works with community advisors for specific expertise and to ensure efforts are being utilized in the areas of most demand. They identify and implement strategies to facilitate the use of volunteer time through technology, restructuring labor intensive activities and effectively managing sustainable growth for our programs and donor events.

4. Marketing strategies are currently being enhanced through professional guidance that will increase and promote our brand recognition to a growing and more diverse demographic by expanding the use of social media to encourage new membership, additional funding sources and public awareness of the services we offer.

During 2019-20 Assistance League of Redlands served approximately 7,100 lives in the greater Redlands, Yucaipa, Loma Linda area of the Inland Empire in Southern California and contributed more than 40,000 hours of volunteer support for our philanthropic programs and fund raising activities which has provided $384,855 in goods and services to economically disadvantaged children and families in our community. Through our Operation School Bell's philanthropic partnership with Kohl's Department Store, we increased the number of elementary age students to 1200 annually from participating schools in the Redlands and Yucaipa Districts who enjoyed shopping for school clothing and shoes. Our award-winning, low-cost Dental Center provided 2500 patients with affordable oral care and hygiene, including orthodontia. Our chapter increased funding by $45,000 in grants and improved Thrift Shop revenue to approximately $336,,000 per year by adding one volunteer member per day to staff the sales floor and using a member-donated van staffed by a 4-member crew to bring in additional inventory for sale.
Our Marketing plan has developed and implemented a new website and social media platforms that have been successful in reaching a broader demographic by realizing a contact increase of 63% resulting in increased Thrift Shop sales, membership registration and community awareness. We worked with the city to install our organization's monument sign at four community locations and are promoting our chapter through active membership in the Redlands Chamber of Commerce and Redlands Charitable Coalition.
We would like to:
• Secure the expertise required to develop a sustainable social media presence and
maintainable chapter website to more effectively reach a broader audience for
support and awareness.
• Upgrade our use of technology to enhance our programs and facilitate volunteer
support.
• Develop a system for efficient collection of data that supports the implementation of
outcome measurement techniques to validate program effectivity.
• Complete and implement a more technologically advanced marketing plan designed to
promote increased membership, as well as community awareness and support for our
philanthropic and fundraising activities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Economically disadvantaged children, families and the homeless demographic of all ethnicities and ages.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Revised our Dental Center program to include under-insured members of our community. Revised our Operation School Bell program to include a Spring Session for all 23 elementary schools we serve to those who also came to our Fall session. We were reminded that children go through clothes and shoes rapidly at this age.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Allowed under-insured members of our community to benefit from our dental services without having to show proof of economic status. This increased the number of people we served and created a more positive relationship with our dental patients who are now empowered to seek services on a more equitable footing. Revising our Operation School Bell program in response to feedback from parents and school counselors created a more positive support from the community.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

Assistance League of Redlands
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Assistance League of Redlands

Board of directors
as of 8/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Leticia Cervantes

Assistance League of Redlands

Term: 2021 - 2022

Karen Irwin

Assistance League of Redlands

Marie Mitchell

Assistance League of Redlands

Louise Schumann

Assistance League of Redlands

Shirley Guy

Assistance League of Redlands

Mandy Emerson

Assistance League of Redlands

Gail Smith

Assistance League Redlands

Kathy Swenson

Assistance League of Redlands

Ginger Boyd

Assistance League of Redlands

Cesca Nolan

Assistance League of Redlands

Leticia Cervantes

Assistance League Redlands

Mary Saba

Assistance League of Redlands

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/25/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data