Project Concern International (PCI), A Global Communities Partner

aka Project Concern International (PCI)   |   San Diego, CA   |  http://www.pciglobal.org

Mission

Founded in 1961, PCI's mission is to enhance health, end hunger and overcome hardship. PCI is committed to sustainable change in the health and self-sufficiency of people living in extreme poverty. Through nearly 60 years of experience working in communities living in poverty around the world, key learnings form the foundation for everything we do and for our distinct approach to international health and development programming. We know that the problems of poor health and poverty are inseparable, and that there is no simple or single solution. We know that sustainable solutions require individual and community ownership, and must address the root causes of the problems they face.

Ruling year info

1963

President and CEO

Mrs Carrie Hessler-Radelet

Main address

5151 Murphy Canyon Rd Ste 320 Suite 320

San Diego, CA 92123 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Project Concern International

EIN

95-2248462

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

PCI is working to end extreme poverty.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food security

PCI takes a comprehensive approach to improving health outcomes by integrating its food security programs with nutrition, health, agricultural development, food aid, and disaster risk management interventions. PCI has implemented 19 USAID Title II food assistance projects since 1997, including eight Development Food Assistance Programs (DFAP)/Multi-Year Assistance Programs (MYAP), two Single-year Assistance Programs, and 11 International Food Relief Partnership programs. PCI is currently implementing DFAPs in Malawi, Liberia, Bangladesh, and Guatemala. As a key implementing partner for USAID/FFP’s LAUNCH program in Liberia, PCI leads all of the maternal child health and nutrition activities, which includes the preventing malnutrition in children under two approach, and improves education opportunities for children and youth. PCI also plays a key role in assuring gender equity in project implementation and manages all activities related to DRR and EWS. As a part of USAID/FFP’s PROSHAR program in Bangladesh, PCI leads the implementation of all maternal and child health and nutrition activities, which includes the preventing malnutrition in children under two approach. In addition it is the lead of all DRR activities which focus on building the capacities of communities and government institutions to engage in effective DRM and address long-term trends, such as those associated with climate change. As an implementing partner in USAID/FFP’s PAISANO program in Guatemala, PCI is leading all project interventions in five of the project’s 13 target municipalities, managing distribution of over one-third of the project’s commodities, and spearheading the project’s cross-cutting goal to improve the status of women. Through funding from USDA, PCI has designed and implemented an additional 25 food aid projects (nine Food for Progress (FFPr) programs; 13 Food for Education (FFE) programs; and four 416(b) programs) in Tanzania, Indonesia, Bolivia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, and the Central America Region. PCI is currently implementing 3 FFE programs in Tanzania, Guatemala, and Nicaragua. Through USDA-funded school-based food security programs in Nicaragua, Guatemala and Tanzania, 184,000 students received a hot, nutritious meal daily in 2014.

Population(s) Served

As a recognized leader in the adept use of local programmatic platforms (such as uniformed services, schools, self-help groups, Care Groups, etc.) in order to reach the most vulnerable populations, PCI has used innovative advocacy, communication, social mobilization and behavior change strategies to prevent and mitigate the spread of infectious diseases (such as polio, TB, Ebola, and HIV/AIDS) and chronic diseases (such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer). Since the beginning of the Ebola outbreak, PCI has reached more than 140,000 people in Liberia through community mobilization and awareness-raising efforts. This includes providing key messages though an established network of community volunteers, including lead mothers of Care Groups, community WASH committees, parent/teacher associations, community health committees, and DRR committees. Through an emphasis on effectively engaging and building the capacity of local stakeholders, including the Liberian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare at the central, county and district levels, PCI has galvanized strategic alliances and established a number of networks, tools and evidence-based approaches that are being utilized to respond to the Ebola outbreak. PCI had been awarded 17 major HIV/AIDS-related programs funded by PEPFAR. As part of this portfolio, with funding from DHAPP, PCI provides technical assistance to the defense forces of Zambia, Malawi, and Botswana to implement, manage, and evaluate comprehensive HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care and support programs. Through PCI’s collaboration with DHAPP in these three countries, PCI has reached nearly 100,000 service members and their families since 2003. In India, with funding from the Centers for Disease Control, PCI provides intensive technical assistance (TA) to the Indian National AIDS Control Organization (NACO) with a focus on expanding TA and collaboration at national, state and district levels to effectively design, implement and monitor HIV and AIDS programs through strengthening of laboratory systems in India. By the end of the project in March 2015, 60 laboratories will have obtained accreditation, from a baseline of zero in 2009, and this achievement exceeds the PEPFAR target of 50. Working in partnership with the CORE Secretariat in India, the Government of India (GOI), the World Health Organization (WHO), numerous other international and national NGOs, and local district authorities and communities, PCI implements the Core Group Polio Project in 3 high risk districts in the state of Uttar Pradesh. PCI’s social mobilization efforts in Uttar Pradesh, India, increased the number of children fully immunized against polio in PCI’s intervention areas from only 45.3% in 2010-11 to 73% in 2013, according to Annual Health Survey data.

Population(s) Served

With decades of experience worldwide, PCI has consistently demonstrated its ability to affect positive life cycle changes through the provision of services, shaping MCH behaviors, and in reducing the incidence of life-threatening diseases in mothers, infants and children and their families. With funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, PCI reached 323,650 women in Indian through the promotion of participatory learning and collective action in women’s groups, which provide a sense that change is possible, to ultimately liberate these marginalized women and communities to be effective agents of change, resulting in improved MCH behaviors now and in the future. Under the USAID-funded Every Preemie – SCALE (Scaling, Catalyzing, Advocating, Learning, Evidence-Driven) program, PCI is providing practical, catalytic, and scalable approaches for expanding uptake of preterm birth (PTB) and low birth weight (LBW) interventions in 24 USAID priority countries in Africa and Asia. This $9M program began in FY14 and will scale up evidence-based and underutilized PTB and LBW interventions by translating evidence into action at and below the national level, increasing capacity and performance for improved service delivery at facility and community levels, and increasing prioritization of PTB and LBW interventions within national and global policies, protocols, and initiatives. PCI’s legacy program in Guatemala, Casa Materna, provides a maternal waiting home for high-risk pregnant women who can access skilled care delivery, post-partum newborn care, nutrition and family planning counseling, and emergency care if needed. To date Casa Materna has reached approximately 250,000 women and trained 768 caregivers, including parents, grandparents and traditional birth attendants on the Kangaroo mother Care method for newborns.

Population(s) Served

PCI currently operates disaster risk reduction and humanitarian assistance programs in nine countries across Africa, Asia and the Americas. PCI provides humanitarian assistance to people affected by disasters and complex emergencies; helps governments, local organizations, and communities better manage risk and respond to emergencies when they arise; and integrates efforts to help reduce vulnerability to disasters into all of its ongoing programs. In Indonesia, where coastal communities are extremely vulnerable to natural disasters and weather events, 84 teachers from 43 schools participated in PCI-facilitated school-based disaster simulations in 2014, aiming to improve the disaster preparedness practices of local communities through knowledge and education. In Ethiopia, pastoralist families utilized geo-climatic satellite data for decision-making on where to migrate and locate good grazing land to reduce livestock deaths. PCI’s interventions led to a 47% drop in herd mortality in vulnerable communities representing $8.4 million dollars in livestock surviving compared to average annual losses experienced in the previous three years. PCI estimates that $5.4 million (64% of the value in reduced losses) can be attributed to PCI’s interventions. Under the USAID-funded Barrio Mío Project in Guatemala, PCI is transforming an urban neighborhood by reducing its risk of disasters, strengthening the capacity of its municipal government to manage growth, improving water and sanitation infrastructure, and developing the economic assets of its most vulnerable households. Under Barrio Mio, PCI has assisted 11,500 people through new livelihoods development activities, developed 17 disaster response plans with communities and local government, trained over 14,000 people in water management and proper waste disposal, and improved 2,976 shelters in 17 different communities by incorporating multiple DRR measures. In 2014 in Malawi, PCI reinforced the resiliency of rural communities by increasing household agricultural productivity and access to food for nearly 8,600 people – or 132% of the target – through conservation agriculture and home gardens; reinforced the resiliency of nearly 3,000 people – or 150% of the target – through the expansion and support of the VSL program; and strengthened early detection and community-based management of acute malnutrition, which benefited approximately 3,500 people.

Population(s) Served

A hallmark of PCI’s work is the organization’s commitment to implement community-based, holistic, integrated programs that are person-centered and recognize the interrelated nature of the issues people and communities face. For example, Women Empowered (WE) is a PCI global initiative dedicated to promoting the economic and social empowerment of women through the formation of self-managed and self-sustaining savings groups. Global membership now totals over 413,391 members in over 30,000 groups and PCI currently has 15 local partners implementing WE in 6 countries, with direct PCI implementation in 6 others. In recognition of the critical role that women can play as agents of change in the health of their families, PCI’s programs related to maternal and child health integrate education on water and sanitation and disease prevention. This is reflected in PCI’s Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation-sponsored work in Bihar, India, where 323,650 marginalized women are transforming their families’ health by adopting key sanitation behaviors such as hand washing, early and exclusive breastfeeding of infants, and the intake of iron and folic acid for pregnant mothers, as learned through self-help groups. PCI recognizes the impact and importance of mental health on families and communities, and in the U.S., PCI developed tailored curricula that improved by 40-55% the mental health of vulnerable pregnant women, new mothers, and women of reproductive age participating in support groups. Also in the U.S., PCI became a Certified Enrollment Entity via Covered California (State Health Insurance Exchange) and its 5 Certified Counselors directly provided outreach and education to over 1,500 uninsured families through PCI’s programs and provided 406 enrollment referrals. A testimony to PCI’s long term commitment to the communities it serves, PCI’s four Legacy Programs in India, Guatemala, Mexico and the U.S./Mexico Border have been operating for a combined 63 years, during which time they have served nearly 1.5 million people with lifesaving access to care and services, including safe pregnancy care for Mayan women in Guatemala, access to health assessments and referrals for Mexican immigrants in the U.S.; well-baby clinics in remote slums around Tijuana, Mexico; and support services for street children in New Delhi, India. Finally, PCI has many decades of experience in not only effectively engaging with local entities as partners in transformational development, but also in improving local capacity for sustainable, community-driven change at scale. Throughout 2014, PCI developed and disseminated via a series of regional workshops several new tools and approaches related to these three cross-cutting and fundamental themes, including: Gold Standards of Performance for all three thematic areas, a new set of tools designed to effectively measure changes in local capacity, and the new published Resource Guide for Enhancing Potential for Sustainable Impact.

Population(s) Served

Economic empowerment is central to women’s ability to overcome poverty, cope with shocks and improve their well-being. When women realize their economic goals, whether it’s growing a business, improving their home or investing in training or education, they’re more resilient and able to provide for themselves and their families. Yet, globally, women continue to trail men in formal labor force participation, land and property ownership, and access to financial services, like credit and savings.

Approaches tailored to reach women must address and overcome the multiple obstacles that can leave women trapped in poverty. PCI’s Women Empowered (WE) program focuses on increasing women’s skills, decision-making power and access to economic resources. Interventions including the formation of savings and lending groups and income-generating activities help women realize their financial goals and overcome persistent, gender-based barriers. As resourceful economic agents, women can take control of their future and support their families and communities.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

BBB Accredited Charity 2020

Awards

Breastfeeding-Friendly Workplace Award 2011

San Diego County Breastfeeding Coalition

Most Innovative Nonprofit 2016

Classy Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Community members who participated in peer/self-help groups to improve health and nutrition behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Assistance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Women and adolescent girls reached with cervical cancer prevention, screening and/or treatment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Disease prevention

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

7,967 women and adolescent girls reached with cervical cancer prevention, screening and/or treatment; 4,178 of the total reached were adolescent girls.

Number of people tested for HIV

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Disease prevention

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of individuals tested for HIV and linked to treatment

Number of HIV-positive people begin HIV treatment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Disease prevention

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

HIV positive individuals supported with HIV treatment

Orphans and vulnerable children provided with support to improve their health and well-being

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Assistance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Orphans and vulnerable children provided with support to improve their health and well-being

Number of laboratories supported with capacity-building activities to improve accuracy and efficiency of testing and diagnosis

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Disease prevention

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people reached with neglected tropical disease prevention, referral and/or treatment services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Disease prevention

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children reached with a meal each school day

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Food security

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

28,000,000 school meals served to 302,242 primary school children

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

3,527 Schoolteachers provided with improved literacy training and education materials, which benefited 224,002 schoolchildren in 1,531 primary schools

Number of farmers provided with improved agricultural production practices and technologies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Food security

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

17,802 farmers, 64% of whom are women, provided with improved agricultural production practices and technologies

Number of people directly assisted through food security programming 

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Food security

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of people directly assisted through PCI's food security programming 

Number of dollars of private sector investments in agriculture attributable to the organization's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Water and sanitation and other

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of municipalities that implemented PCI’s methodologies for urban resilience

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Assistance

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of municipalities that implemented PCI’s methodologies for urban resilience

Number of people who benefited from PCI’s emergency responses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Assistance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people who benefited from PCI’s urban upgrading methodologies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Assistance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of trees planted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Assistance

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

870,352 trees were planted to increase the resilience to climate change and improve livelihoods and the environment.

Number of women supported in economic empowerment groups

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Nearly 4 million women supported in 304,482 female economic empowerment self-help groups, across 4 countries.

Number of people reached with messages to prevent human trafficking in San Diego

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Assistance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of women provided with basic business skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Women provided with basic business skills training in Africa and the Americas  through PCI's Women Empowered and Gap P.A.C.E training.

Total saved by female economic empowerment groups

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Assistance

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total money saved, to date, by members of PCI-supported female economic empowerment self-help groups to improve their lives, households and communities

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

PCI's mission is to prevent disease, improve community health and promote sustainable development worldwide. Motivated by our concern for the world's most vulnerable children, families and communities, PCI envisions a world where abundant resources are shared, communities are able to provide for the health and well-being of their members, and children and families can achieve lives of hope, good health and self-sufficiency. PCI works in vulnerable communities to improve health and create long-term change by helping people help themselves. PCI focuses our efforts in to following intervention areas; Women's Empowerment & Poverty, Child and Maternal Health, Food Security & Water Programs, Disease Prevention, Disaster Relief and Recovery as well as Disaster Risk Reduction.

Between 2013 and 2016, PCI will help transform the lives of 10 million people. PCI will unleash the power of families and communities to transform their own lives using the following strategic directions as we strive to achieve these goals and accomplish our mission. Direction 1: Sustainable Impact Strategy: PCI will apply the post-project sustainability measurement strategy to at least one program in each region and in each intervention area per year. PCI will also produce, test, finalize and disseminate a Sustainability Toolkit. Direction 2: Local Capacity Strengthening. Strategy: PCI will disseminate a package of tools and training materials for taking its local capacity building and measurement methodologies to scale. There will be implementation of PCI's plan to measure local capacity improvements utilizing PCI's Global Impact Measurement System to capture programmatic results (quality and scale) of improved local capacity. Direction 3: Gender Strategy: PCI will strengthen the positioning of PCI as a leader in gender-sensitive programming, including increased participation in gender-related task forces, interest groups and communities. PCI will focus on increasing institutionalization of the work of the Gender Equity Commission to include development and dissemination of updated gender-related policies, guidelines and tools throughout PCI. PCI will place greater emphasis on women's economic, social and political empowerment as a core element of PCI's theory of change, via the Women Empowered Initiative. Direction 4: Innovation Strategy: PCI will support, inspire and expect innovation amongst all staff by providing them with the time, tools and resources for innovation and rewarding measured risk-taking rather than treating it as a liability. We will create specific innovation pathways to better solicit, process, track and disseminate our best innovations in the shortest period possible. Direction 5: Leveraging Knowledge Strategy: We will improve documentation, positioning and marketing of PCI's programming and results, including increased visibility in industry journals and other publications/communications platforms and conferences. PCI will effectively utilize IT platform to access and share strategic information. Direction 6: Game Changing Resources Strategy: PCI will work to create new corporate partnerships and strengthen private foundation cultivation efforts. We will secure catalytic multi-year six- and seven-figure gifts, with a focus on social entrepreneurs as part of the Investing in Solutions campaign and expand national reach through Board relationships and new staff re-assignments. Direction 7: Organizational Excellence Strategy: We will ensure that we have the capacity needed to support this strategic direction, and align staff performance objectives with our overall strategic objectives. PCI will also create learning and development opportunities linked to career paths and staff competencies.

Since 1961 when PCI was founded by Dr. James Turpin, the focus of the organization has remained true to its founder: PCI works in vulnerable communities to improve health and create long-term change by helping people help themselves. After 50 years of experience working in communities living in poverty around the world, key learnings form the foundation for everything we do and for our distinct approach to international health and development programming. We know that the ability to measure the real results and impact of our work, not just the activities, is critical to justify investment in our programs and in our organization.

What distinguishes PCI's work is our ability to attack the root causes of poor health and poverty, whether cultural, environmental or socio-political. We listen closely to, and work with, those who are most affected, respecting and leveraging their own assets, ambitions, capabilities, successes and leadership to co-create sustainable community solutions. Additionally, we implement, whenever possible, holistic, integrated programs that are person-centered and recognize the interrelated nature of the issues people and communities face. PCI cultivates relationships and networks that provide a strong connective role among stakeholders at the community level, a bridging role between global, regional and national interests, and a leveraging role that multiplies the impact of every dollar spent. We develop unique tools to measure the significant and long-term impact of our work on people's lives.

PCI is convinced that these mutually reinforcing attributes are essential for solutions that are empowering and sustainable, and that result in better health, self-sufficiency, and true development for the millions of people we serve. They are what make PCI unique and uniquely effective.

As reported in the 2014 Annual Report, released April 2014, the number of people benefiting from PCI's program services stands at 8,124,099; there are 413,391 global members in 30,833 Women Empowered savings group. 17,408 organizations are currently benefiting from PCI's capacity strengthening efforts, 3,525 metric tons of food has been delivered in daily rations to 184,000 school children in Bolivia, Guatemala, and Tanzania, national policy has been influenced in 92% of the countries PCI works in, and PCI distributed supplies to almost 2,000 households in the Philippines in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. These are just a few of the programmatic statistics from work done in 2013 and 2014.

Of the 26 investments mentioned above representing objectives within our seven strategic directions (Sustainable Impact, Local Capacity Strengthening, Gender, Innovation, Leveraging Knowledge, Game Changing Resources, Organizational Excellence), 14 of these projects have been implemented wide scale throughout the organization. PCI's strategic successes include implementation of the Women's Empowered Initiative in 12 of the 16 countries planned, PCI released our Sustainability Toolkit and Safety and Security Manual to 14 countries, innovation trainings were completed in six countries, PCI was nominated in the category of Human Rights at the 5th annual StayClassy Awards and won in the Women's Rights category, PCI became a Clinton Global Initiative member, and PCI had the opportunity to host a congressional briefing in Washington DC to discuss the importance and challenges of measuring economic and social impact of women.
PCI has made great strides towards achieving the objectives set forth by the 2013-2016 Strategic Plan and will continue to move towards organizational excellence through additional rollouts, trainings, and program implementations in our 15 different countries. Additional work will be needed specifically in the areas of Game Changing Resources as we move towards our financial goals of achieving more private support and an ever decreasing our management to program expense ratio and Leveraging knowledge as we move in increase global awareness of our organizations capabilities and brand.

*Preliminary results, all data self- reported.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Project Concern International (PCI), A Global Communities Partner
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Project Concern International (PCI), A Global Communities Partner

Board of directors
as of 2/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Robert Sullivan

Dean, Rady School of Management, UC San Diego

Nancy Plaxico

Healthways, Inc., Retired

Judith Ettinger

No Affiliation

Joesph Abbate

ResMed

Vikrant Batra

Hewlett Packard

Alejandro Bustamante

Plantronics, Inc.

John Collins

Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton, LLP

Ruth Covell

Associate Dean Emeritus, UCSD School of Medicine

Karen Hoehn

Hoehn Motors

Peter Huffman

Merrill Lynch

William McQuinn

McQuinn Realty, Inc.

Neil Otto

Otto Family Foundation

Royce Pepin

Pepin Pharmacies

Cheryl Pia

Pia Communications, Inc.

John Potter

Strategy& UK

Ambassador Pierre-Richard Prosper

U.S. Ambassador, Retired

Bhasker Shetty

La Jolla Labratories

Robert Sullivan

Dean, Rady School of Management

Christopher Twomey

Biosite Incorporated, Retired

Marshall Whiting

Clinical Psychologist

Susan Callahan

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/27/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability