COMMUNITY ACTION PARTNERSHIP OF KERN

Helping People...Changing Lives

aka Community Action Partnership of Kern   |   Bakersfield, CA   |  www.capk.org

Mission

Community Action Partnership of Kern will address underlying causes of poverty, alleviate the effects, and promote dignity and self-sufficiency in the communities we serve.

Ruling year info

1965

Cheif Executive Officer

Jeremy T. Tobias

Main address

5005 Business Park North

Bakersfield, CA 93309 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Kern County Economic Opportunity Corporation (KCEOC)

EIN

95-2402760

NTEE code info

Child Day Care (P33)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CAPK has been the official anti-poverty agency for Kern County, working to provide services for low-income families since 1965. One of more than 1,000 community action agencies nationwide, CAPK is one of Kern County’s largest nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporations, with over 900 employees and 16 comprehensive human service programs. CAPK provides help and hope to over 100,000 low-to-moderate income residents/families annually through basic needs during crisis and challenging times, pre-K child education, case management, home-based services, prevention and education services, financial education and empowerment support, social and life skills-building, pre-employment and paid work experience, and hands-on experience/s designed to increase self-sufficiency, foster increased learning and provide opportunities for productive and successful lives.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Bank

CAPK’s Food Bank supports a network of 113 partnering food distribution sites throughout Kern County to provide food assistance to low-income families and individuals. The Food Bank also offers the Senior Food and BackPack Buddies program at CAPK youth centers, schools and other community sites.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Friendship House provides educational and recreational services to children from low-income families, such as afterschool and summer programs, as well as resources for the entire community, including plans for medical services, food distribution, job training and an outreach center.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

In December 2003, the CAPK Shafter Youth Center (SYC) was established through a $1.3 million grant from the California Youth Authority and a $249,000 match and a land donation from the City of Shafter. The Center provides services to low-income youth ages 6-21. Current SYC programs include an after-school program that provides a welcoming environment for community youth to feel safe and participate in daily activities such as homework assistance, tutoring, arts and crafts, a reading program, hands-on computer lab activities, a Wii Stay Fit fitness program, and recreational sports. In addition, the program offers a summer program, Information and Education (teen pregnancy prevention program), and a monthly commodities distribution. The Center is open Monday-Friday 8am-5pm. Services are provided free of charge.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

In 2006, CAPK began operating the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program which provides free tax preparation assistance to Kern residents. In connection with the VITA program, CAPK has also operated a financial literacy and Individual Development Account (IDA) program, administered an Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) outreach program, and has operated a Tax Credit for the Elderly (TCE) program. The VITA program provides tax preparation services year round. During the 2012 tax season, the program e-filed 4,233 returns.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

CAPK's Energy program assists income-eligible Kern County residents with utility bill payment, home weatherization and energy education.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Head Start/Early Head Start serves low-income preschool children and their families in Kern County and San Joaquin County, California. We offer center based and home based education opportunities.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Economically disadvantaged people

CAPK 2-1-1 information call and referral center.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

CAPK Migrant Childcare program with offices in Kern, Kings, Tulare, Fresno, Madera, and Merced Counties. Program operates in all California counties.

Population(s) Served
Migrant workers
Families

The WIC program provides nutrition education, breastfeeding support and food vouchers for families with infants and children up to age 5.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Our two Family Resource centers provide resources, education, and crisis assistance to individuals, families, and children in Eastern Kern County. They focus on providing care management and educational support to families that build their economic resilience. The East Kern Family Resource Center is based in Mojave and the Oasis Family Resource Center is based in the City of Ridgecrest. Both locations assist individuals and families living in surrounding communities.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adolescent parents
Single parents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Food Bank

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Pounds of food distributed for the year 2020.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Grants received for CAPK Food Bank, Youth Centers, East Kern Family Resource Center, and 211 Kern as well as two new programs.

Number of phone calls/inquiries

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

2-1-1 Kern County

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Calls received by CAPK 2-1-1 Kern County information and referral service in 2016.

Number of hours of training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Head Start/Early Head Start

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Hours of training by Head Start teachers and other employees of CAPK in 2016.

Number of parents receiving WIC benefits for their children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Women, Infants and Children

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CAPK WIC number of families average monthly caseload.

Number of media partnerships developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of low income migrant children provided child care services in the last year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Migrant workers

Related Program

Migrant Childcare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CAPK's Migrant Childcare is a voucher-based child care program that specifically serves migrant, agriculturally working families in Kern, Kings, Tulare, Fresno, Madera and Merced Counties.

Number of after school program participants during the year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Friendship House Community Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

After school children participating in tutoring, physical activities and computer lab activities at CAPK Shafter Youth Center and Friendship House Community Center.

Number of households weatherized with energy efficient appliance installation during the year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Energy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Households assisted with home weatherization plus energy-efficient appliance installation valued at $1,999,542 during 2016.

Number of households assisted with gas and electric bill payments during the year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Energy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Households assisted with gas and electric bill payments totaling $4,713,500 in 2016.

Number of people recieving free tax preperation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Tax returns completed.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Community Action Partnership of Kern's 2021-2025 Strategic Plan

Goal #1: Increased access to healthy, affordable food to support the health of the communities we serve.

Goal #2: All families in the communities we serve have access to high-quality early learning and care choices to meet their diverse needs.

Goal #3: Advance economic empowerment and financial stability for low-income people in the communities we serve.

Goal #4: CAPK seeks to be an employer of choice and attract and retain a high-quality workforce to achieve the organization's desired results.

Goal #5: Increase utilization of data-driven decision-making processes to improve organizational capacity to achieve results.

Goal #6: Increase fiscal health and stability of the agency to properly align resources to support clients and build capacity staff.

Commitment to a continuous state of improvement. To accomplish transformative goals, CAPK began a long-term effort to establish goals and change the culture of CAPK. The Burning Platform was shared with the Board of Directors, all employees, CAPK's partners, and stakeholders in the community. CAPK Division Directors are engaged in continuous training to improve communication and work effectively as a cohesive group.

Investment in professional development. With over 800 well-trained employees who are committed to the Burning Platform, CAPK becomes a tremendous force able to positively impact the Kern County community. Head Start employees regularly participate in extensive training; CAPK volunteers were provided with training on the many programs offered to the community; and specialized supervisory training was provided to all managerial staff. An Employee Recognition Committee has been created to identify strategies to acknowledge outstanding employees.

Improvement of systems and policies. Improved the agency's core capacity by upgrading or adopting reporting, tracking and operational systems and software and reorganizing divisions and functions to improve efficiency. CAPK installed new accounting, human resources, and payroll software; streamlined and reorganized the procurement process; reorganized the Information Technology unit and services; adopted an indirect cost rate; updated finance policies and procedures; and strengthened annual audit controls.

Improvement of communication. Improved CAPK's communication capabilities by assigning an Outreach and Advocacy Manager to direct both internal and external communications, which increases the dissemination and consistency of information to employees, clients, stakeholders, and the community.

CAPK is moving forward to meet identified goals and our capabilities include:
• Staff are knowledgeable and committed to the service population.
• Board and executive leadership are strong.
• Programs have been flexible to changes in the environment.
• Organization is able to meet contractual obligations and has some systems in place to manage risk.
• Families receive high quality services.
• Organization is knowledgeable and responsive to the needs of families.
• Partnership with other service providers.
• Provision of services in rural and “hard to reach" populations where limited access exists.
• Long history of service to the community.
• Good contract compliance and strong relationships with funders.

External policies and funding do not sufficiently support the ability of individuals (service recipients) to achieve self-sufficiency or the organization (CAPK) to adequately respond to community needs. Advocacy that has been conducted has largely been responsive to possible cuts, positioning the organization to consistently function in a survival mode. Most CAPK services are dependent upon public and private funding, which is becoming more competitive and constrained, while the demand for services continues to increase. The organization does not have a proactive planning approach to diversifying its funding stream or a designated plan of action in the event that a major cut in funding were to occur. CAPK will improve our advocacy position in the community and with national organizations between now and 2022.

CAPK has not been able to provide highly accurate estimates of unduplicated service counts in the past. This is primarily due to certain programs operating in technical silos over time. In order to connect our customers to our other services, we need to make this a priority in the next few years. By 2019 we will improve our internal connectivity for existing customers and tie all of our services together through uniform databases that will allow us to report unduplicated numbers.

By immediately connecting customers to internal programs through a central intake system or connected databases, CAPK will increase our service efficiency.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

COMMUNITY ACTION PARTNERSHIP OF KERN
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

COMMUNITY ACTION PARTNERSHIP OF KERN

Board of directors
as of 1/13/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Curtis Floyd

Law Offices of Floyd & Horrigan

Term: 2018 - 2020


Board co-chair

Mr. Warren Peterson

Warren Peterson Connstruction

Term: 2018 - 2020

Fred Plane

23th U.S. Congressional District Representative

Marian Panos

City of Bakersfield Mayor's Office

Mike Maggard

Kern County Board of Supervisors Representative

Janea Benton

32nd State Assembly District Representative

Yolanda Ochoa

East Kern Representative

Vacant Vacant

South Kern County Representative

Jose Gurrola

Bakersfield Representative

VACANT VACANT

South Kern

Craig Henderson

The Henderson Group

Warren Peterson

Warren Peterson Construction

Garth Corrigan

16th State Senate District

Jonathan Mullings

Private Sector

Ana Vigil

North Kern Low Income

VACANT VACANT

S.A. Camp Companies

Guadalupe Perez

Metro Bakersfield

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/08/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.