PLATINUM2024

UFW FOUNDATION

#sisepuede #ufwf

Los Angeles, CA   |  https://www.ufwfoundation.org/

Mission

To empower communities to ensure human dignity

Notes from the nonprofit

With so much commanding our attention and action, UFW Foundation was called upon to expand its reach and witnessed much growth. Our work became more relevant than ever with a greater focus post-COVID on the lives and contributions of farm workers—essential workers who feed the country. We expanded our on-the-ground organizing and advocacy work to Michigan, Georgia, Washington and Arizona, all states with a sizeable farm worker presence and a largely overlooked calling to stand up for farm worker rights. Going forward, we will continue to grow and strengthen our advocacy on a national level. We are also thrilled about our progress with the development and deployment of our Digital Initiative (DI), a transformative, systems-building undertaking to advance equity via a comprehensive mobile app.

Ruling year info

1974

Chief Executive Officer

Diana Tellefson-Torres

Main address

P.O. Box 23400

Los Angeles, CA 90023 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-2703575

NTEE code info

Minority Rights (R22)

Ethnic/Immigrant Services (P84)

Legal Services (I80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

To improve the lives of farm workers. This will happen as farm workers gain more agency by engaging and sharing what their experiences are via digital and on-the-ground organizing efforts. With active farm worker participation nationally, the UFW Foundation will be able to aggregate data to demonstrate which employers are doing the right thing and which ones are skirting the law. This information will lead to more transparency that farm workers, consumers, retailers, investors and other stakeholders will benefit from. Farm workers will no longer feel that they need to be in the shadows or that they must endure injustice. By being an equal member of the industry, farm workers would work with all stakeholders to make their work environment more just. In fact, the history of the Farm Worker Movement has always involved the engagement of consumers because they can influence retailer and industry behavior.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Advancement Services

Our Community Advancement and Outreach Services provide the following to farm worker communities:
• Legal Immigration Services - Providing legal immigration services
Centers is at the origins of this organization’s establishment.
• Education/Outreach Sessions and Workshops - offer Information and Workshops to respond to legal, labor, health, related housing, and social service needs
• Emergency Relief Efforts - have provided much needed disaster response including mass food, PPE and vaccine distribution during the COVID-19 pandemic:
o Total served through Emergency Relief efforts: 889,624
o COVID Tests Administered: 37,326
o Farm Workers Assisted: 125,362
o COVID-19 Vaccinations: 40,307
o Masks Distributed: 2,823,260
o Hand Sanitizer Distributed: 65,982
o Food Boxes Distributed: 142,727
o World Central Kitchen Meals Distributed: 237,996
o $23 million in disaster relief payments to undocumented populations and farm workers

Population(s) Served

Systemic Change encompasses the organization’s efforts to make meaningful progress toward social justice. Our Systemic Change department seeks to improve the lives of farm workers, immigrants and Latinos—all farm workers and low-income immigrant workers—through legislative advocacy, community outreach and education, organizing campaigns, and leadership development efforts that help actualize just and equitable practices, policies, and institutions.
• Advocacy and Education:
o Advocacy and public education with farm workers and low-income immigrant workers
o Know Your Rights Education
o Civic Education, Leadership Development, and Engagement efforts with farm workers and farm worker communities
o Voter Education on Key Issues and Policy Matters
o Voter Registration
o A Day in the Life of a Farm Worker
o Developing and Championing Just and Equitable Polices
o Reached and engaged over 100,000 farm workers in immigration reform events that included outreach to migrant farm worker camps.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Immigrants and migrants

Where we work

Awards

Board of Immigration Appeals Recognition 2009

Board of Immigration Appeals Recognition

Affiliations & memberships

Department of Justice Recognition & Accreditation 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children receiving medical services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Community Advancement Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are # children were enrolled in public benefits in 2018. Recent Public Charge rule resulted in disenrollment by our mostly immigrant populations.

Number of national media pieces on the topic

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Community Advancement Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

At the end of 2020, the UFW Foundation had appeared in over 960 media hits, a 60% increase as compared to 2019. The UFW Foundation’s total audience reached through the collective 956.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Community Advancement Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The UFWF increased its direct reach to 957,126 through meal and food box distribution, 750,000 masks distributed, $14,374,500 is cash cards distributed to 28,749 farmworkers as part of its COVID work

Number of groups brought together in a coalition/alliance/partnership

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Community Advancement Services

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The UFW Foundation has a long history of working collaboratively with other nonprofits. We have subcontracted with over 20 nonprofits to deliver services throughout Central Coast & Central California

Number of rallies/events/conferences/lectures held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Community Advancement Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The UFW Foundation reached close to 1 million people in 2020 through its pandemic relief program across 6 states

Number of affiliates speaking to government leaders about relevant policy issues

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Community Advancement Services

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The UFW Foundation works collaboratively with other organizations on policy issues. Recent years have seen demand to join together to fight anti-immigrant policies

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Community Advancement Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Community Advancement Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These results reflect the number clients and service recipients.

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Community Advancement Services

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

With the funding of the FFWR program, a $97 million emergency COVID relief effort targeting farm workers nationally, the UFWF focused its staffing on implementing this 2-year grant.

Number of grassroots organizations supported

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, People of Latin American descent, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Community Advancement Services

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

The UFWF was granted a $97 million grant that included 9 farm worker serving non-profits to implement a national program, including the US territories.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Community Advancement Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. The UFWF will continue to work diligently to increase its reach to ensure farm workers understand their rights, continued to have access to critical information, virtual immigration legal services, food, health care and other disaster relief.
2. Continue to expand an extensive digital and traditional media work that positions farm workers at the forefront of the public narrative.
3. Increase the number of consumers, media outlets, policymakers and other stakeholders who are championing farm workers and participating in improving their lives. This will be accomplished, in part, by informing consumers about farm workers struggles and provide them with easily accessible information.
4. Increasing our on-the- ground and digital service delivery and organizing, in order to more effectively defend the rights and dignity of farm workers and all immigrants.
5. Continue to focus on workers' rights and immigration legal services. The large demand for these services coupled with a lack of organizations that provide these services presents an opportunity to fully define and strengthen our workers' rights and organizing programs.
6. Advocacy efforts to be integrated with our other programs so that staff understand and can engage constituents on our advocacy campaigns.
7. Communications efforts highlight the stories of constituents we serve to further engender trust, hope and engagement.
8. The UFWF strives to be creative and seek opportunities that are both relevant to our constituents locally and nationally and that lead us closer to systemic changes that improve the lives of farm workers.
9. Work to ensure our advocacy, organizing, civic engagement and services programs are aligned and symbiotic. We cannot be siloed in our program areas instead, strong communication and collaboration between programs and departments will help the organization thrive and reach its long-term objectives. We must be creative and seek opportunities that are both relevant to our constituents locally and nationally and that lead us closer to systemic changes that improve the lives of farm workers.
10. In order to expand our reach and build our base nationally and regionally, we need to ensure that we continue to develop our technology infrastructure. Technology is evolving rapidly, and we may not know what tools may be accessible even two years from now. Therefore, we must keep apprised of technology changes and work to innovate to create our own tools that can make us more effective and efficient in all the work we do. As we continue to innovate, we must also be intentional about the deployment and integration of these new digital tools.

1. Consumers are becoming more conscious of their power. We seek to influence consumers and other stakeholders to ensure transformative change in the lives of farm workers. More consumers buying practices are driven by a commitment to making purchasing decisions that have a positive social, economic, and environmental impact. If more and more consumers use their funds to buy ethical products, we change the existing narrative.
2. Program Expansion and Power Building
In the next five years, the UFW Foundation will continue to expand nationally in order to increase its reach and impact. Because our brand is strongest in California, we will need to develop new ways to not only promote our services and advocacy efforts outside of California, but also new ways to communicate with farm workers and the public in communities not historically familiar with the farm worker movement. In order to strengthen and scale our programs, it is imperative that we strengthen our programmatic training, infrastructure, processes and systems.
3. Empowerment and Capacity Building. The organization needs to reinforce that all staff and volunteers are ambassadors of empowerment and organizing efforts. The development of an advocacy and communications strategy specialized for our services team will be essential in order to better train services staff. In essence, program integration and interdepartmental mobilization will be paramount to achieve the systemic change we want to see.
4. Technology and Data
In order to expand our reach and build our base nationally and regionally, we need to ensure that we continue to develop our technology infrastructure. Technology is evolving rapidly, and we may not know what tools may be accessible even two years from now. Therefore, we must keep apprised of technology changes and work to innovate to create our own tools that can make us more effective and efficient in all the work we do. As we continue to innovate, we must also be intentional about the deployment and integration of these new digital tools.
5. Infrastructure and Financial Resources
Clearly, growth and new areas of work also requires financial resources. As the organization grows, so must the development and marketing departments that drive our fundraising. We also need to strengthen the organizational fundraising culture and our philosophy regarding money. In order to expand, we must empower staff members outside of the central office and volunteers to collaborate on local fundraising efforts. Cross training and support will be needed from the development and marketing teams to ensure that staff and volunteers feel confidence in their ability to raise funds. It will be necessary to develop tools and mechanisms to support others in their learning.

The UFW Foundation has Office of Legal Access Programs (OLAP) Recognition and Accreditation, (formerly BIA) with staff members in each office who are OLAP accredited and able to provide immigration legal representation. These staff members assist clients with Naturalization, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), Family Visa Petitions, U-VISA and Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) visas, and Consular Processing. The UFW Foundation (UFWF) is the fastest growing non-profit immigration legal services provider; it has the second largest number of OLAP Accredited Representatives in California (22) and third largest number in the nation. Currently the UFWF has 6 Recognized sites, Los Angeles, Oxnard, Salinas, Phoenix, Bakersfield, and Fresno. Additionally, the UFWF has 22 accredited representatives; 18 of which are partial with 4 fully accredited. Additionally, the UFW Foundation has a long history of organizing and advocacy.

MILESTONES
The UFW Foundation responded to the enormous need for health, financial, and economic assistance among farm worker and low-income worker communities. In addressing the needs, we provided:
public health education and interventions in California and expanded on-the-ground efforts to Georgia, Michigan, Washington and Arizona.
$23 million in emergency relief assistance payments to farm workers and their families in need;
237,996 meals, 142,727 emergency food boxes, over 2 million face masks/protective equipment to low-income immigrant/farm worker communities.
40,307 vaccinations through community-based and community-wide events.

Beyond direct assistance, we were called to advocate and act on issues of concern at the national level. Farm workers support the US economy and are responsible for keeping people across the country and the world fed. Accordingly, we:
Advocated for the establishment of an historic U.S. Department of Agriculture $655MM financial assistance allotment for farm and food workers negatively affected by the pandemic.
Began implementation of $97.8MM USDA grant to administer this assistance nationwide, in coordination with several other organizations, to provide $600 to each eligible farm/food worker. Provided over 89,000 relief payments of $600 to farm workers nationwide.
Advocated for immigration reform and an equitable pathway to legalization for farm workers through the successful passage of the Farm Workforce Modernization Act in the US House of Representatives in 2021.
Met several times with Secretary of Labor Marty Walsh regarding farm worker labor conditions and the exploitation of immigrant workers, particularly through the H-2A guest worker program.
Joined with a coalition of labor, immigrant, and human rights organizations and urged the Biden Administration to conduct a thorough investigation of the H-2A guest worker program after the exposure of human trafficking, slavery, and money laundering abuses in the Georgia Blooming Onion case.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

UFW FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

UFW FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 02/28/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tanis Inbarra

United Farm Workers of America

Term: 2019 - 2023

Tanis Ybarra

United Farm Workers Emeritus

Lupe Martinez

Center for Race, Poverty and the Environment

Ramon Ramirez

Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noreste (PCUN)

Andrea LaRue

Nueva Vista Group LLC

Teresa Romero

United Farm Workers

Diana Tellefson-Torres

UWF Foundation Executive Director

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/27/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/15/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.