North County Lifeline, Inc.

Lifeline gives youth, adults, and families the tools they need to solve their own problems and become self-reliant.

aka Lifeline Community Services   |   Oceanside, CA   |  https://www.nclifeline.org

Mission

North County Lifeline’s mission is to build self-reliance among youth, adults, and families through high-quality, community-based services.

Ruling year info

1973

Executive Director

Donald Stump

Main address

3142 Vista Way, Suite 400

Oceanside, CA 92056 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-2794253

NTEE code info

Personal Social Services (P50)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Lifeline started as a grassroots community organization in 1970, and focused largely on youth drug abuse intervention and prevention. The organization connected families to local resources, and recognized that drug abuse was just a symptom of a more complex problem. Today, Lifeline offers dozens of different programs in five focus areas: Youth Development, Child Abuse and Domestic Violence Prevention and Intervention, Behavioral Health, Housing and Self-Sufficiency, and Human Trafficking Prevention and Intervention. The organization supports youth and families with the goal of helping them to overcome obstacles and become self-reliant. Clients are primarily low-income youth and families in North San Diego County, although some programs reach clients countywide.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Development

North County Lifeline’s Youth Development programs meet the needs of youth and their families on a continuum of services that keep at-risk youth on the right track and help delinquent youth break the cycle of poverty and violence. Lifeline provides prevention and intervention services that include mental and behavioral health programs and youth support groups that focus on healthy and safe lifestyles.

Lifeline’s Youth Development programs have directly contributed to reduced juvenile detention rates in San Diego County by supporting the County’s Juvenile Justice Comprehensive Strategy. Helping at-risk youth stay out of trouble and out of custody are top priorities within the strategy, as well as meeting the complex needs of the youth who are in custody or on probation. According to San Diego County District Attorney Summer Stephan, this strategy has resulted in a 48% reduction in juvenile incarceration from 2012-2017.

With housing and financial support, families can develop the skills needed to become self-reliant.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Lifeline’s Behavioral Health programs work with youth and adults who are struggling with mental health issues, emotional trauma, substance abuse, and thoughts of suicide. Individuals who come to Lifeline for help are often diagnosed with anxiety, depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional disorder, eating disorders, and autism. Lifeline’s Behavioral Health programs include a School-Based Mental Health Full Service Partnership; the adult substance abuse program, Recovery for Life; and the teen suicide prevention program (HERE Now).

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
At-risk youth

Though it is hard to acknowledge, violence happens in families every day. Unacknowledged—and unaddressed—the cycle of violence will continue. 4 out of every 10 children who have experienced abuse and neglect came from a home with domestic violence. (Health and Human Services).

To break the cycle of violence, Lifeline helps both the victim and the offender. Families can find a better way to manage anger and violent behavior, learn more effective parenting and improve relationship skills through intensive services. When it is best for all, the goal is for families to reunify. Last year, North County Lifeline served 700 children through therapeutic home visits, parenting class sessions, and group interventions.

More than 97% of the men who participate in our Lifeline’s 52-week Domestic Violence Offenders group remain free from further arrests. Hundreds of children reunify with their families in our child abuse intervention services.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults

Lifeline builds solutions for youth and families in poverty by partnering with schools, foundations, coalitions, and businesses. Programs provide the support that youth and families need to overcome poverty, homelessness, and trauma. With support, clients develop the skills necessary to achieve self-reliance.

The Communities in Action program is designed to help individuals and families toward stability by providing them with essential tools to promote financial wellness and self-sufficiency. The LifeSpring program helps transition aged foster youth bridge the gap between foster care and independence so that they can become successful, independent adults.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Young adults

San Diego is one of the 13 highest sex trafficking areas in the United States, according to the FBI, and the number of trafficking victims in San Diego continues to increase every year.

Human trafficking is a modern form of slavery. It involves controlling a person through force, fraud, or coercion to exploit the victim for forced labor, commercial sex, or both. Trafficking victims can be male and female, youth and adults, citizens and non-citizens. More than 85% of North County Lifeline’s sex and labor trafficking victims are domestic clients.

The core mission of Lifeline’s human trafficking prevention and intervention program, Project LIFE (Living In Freedom from Exploitation) is to support human trafficking victims on their path to recovery and self-reliance.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Sex workers

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Young adults, Older adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

North County Lifeline's purpose is to give youth and families the tools they need to solve their own problems and become self-reliant within the following five goal areas:
1) Youth Development services for more than 2,000 youth annually, ranging from prevention work to intensive intervention.
2) Behavioral Health (mental health and substance abuse) services for youth age 3 to 21, as well as victims of human trafficking.
3) Housing and Stability services for homeless families and youth as they transition out of foster care.
4) Child Abuse Prevention and Intervention to help families break cycles of violence and build healthy relationships.
5) Mediation and Legal Clinic for low-income clients and local residents interested in applying alternative dispute resolution.

North County Lifeline identified the following strategies in our 2014-17 Strategic Plan:
1) Strategic Initiatives
- Increase behavioral health services to fill existing gaps
- Launch academic tutoring in alignment with Common Core standards for clients in our youth development programs
- Support for victims of human trafficking and prevent future abuse
- Increase housing and services for transition age youth ages 18-24 years as they exit foster care
2) Organizational Development:
- Improve capacity to address key initiatives through Board and leadership development
- Increased fund development and marketing
- Expand key policies & procedures

North County Lifeline was first founded in 1969 when a group of volunteers identified the need to support troubled youth and their families in Oceanside, CA. Today, North County Lifeline has grown to work with more than 7,000 people annually on their path to self-reliance. Lifeline's regional Board of Directors is supported by 100 staff members and more than 500 volunteers including clinical interns. Lifeline's multi-million dollar budget is primarily government funded and is diversifying incrementally each year, led by a Board-driven philanthropic strategy.

North County Lifeline has grown from a grassroots, volunteer-led organization to a large community-based organization working with thousands of families annually who have accomplished self-reliance. The organization's strategic direction focuses on how we can help future kids and families on their own unique path to self-reliance in a way that is effective and long-lasting.

Financials

North County Lifeline, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

North County Lifeline, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 1/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Paul Garza

Genentech

Reginald Owens

Palomar Community College

Paul Cevolani

Novus Origo

Jim Hagar

Hagar & Cotten

Betty Graff

Consultant Land Use Planning

Mary Donovan

Retired Consultant, Tri-City Home Care

Mary Urelius

Retired Educator

Paul Garza

Genentech

Sam Brown

Rancho Mesa Insurance Services

Rusty Williams

Lee & Associates

Andrew Johnson

Brainard Strategies

Richard Domagalski

Wells Fargo

Max Villalobos

Kaiser Permanente

Patricia Prado-Olmos

CSU San Marcos

Sara Campbell

Retired Special Agent in Charge

Harriet Carter

Attorney

Barbara Levine

Math and Statistics Teacher

Rick Martinez

BBVA Bank

Maurice Rayford

Beacon Health Options

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/16/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/16/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.