UNITED AMERICAN INDIAN INVOLVEMENT

Together We Can

aka UAII   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  www.uaii.org

Mission

To promote and support the physical, behavioral and spiritual well-being of American Indian/Alaska Natives in the urban Los Angeles area by providing comprehensive, integrated services that focus on all age groups and incorporate American Indian/Alaska Native cultures and traditions

Ruling year info

1975

C.E.O.

Mr Luis Cervantes

Main address

1125 W 6th St Ste 103

Los Angeles, CA 90017 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-2917933

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Over the 46 years of service to our community, UAII has grown from a small community-based organization providing social services to the American Indian/ Alaskan Natives (AI/AN) community, to a multidisciplinary comprehensive service center addressing the multiple needs of AI/AN countywide. Our long standing in the community has provided us with intimate knowledge of the community, their needs, and an enduring trust, which is integral to program support, assessment, and growth based on need and community involvement. A large barrier for AI/AN people to seek out health services in Los Angeles is due to the lack of providers that are culturally sensitive to their needs. The inclusion of culturally sensitive services and staff have shown a positive impact on the community’s health and overcoming historical trauma which in-turn helps build resilience while improving physical, mental, economic, and spiritual health and wellbeing. We are focused on the holistic treatment of our client’s heal

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Los Angeles American Indian Health Project

The Health Project was designed and implemented in 1996 to enhance the health and well being of the American Indian community in Metropolitan Los Angeles. The Health Project provides public health services and access to free and low cost quality health care. The primary program services are comprehensive case-management, public health nursing, providing access to health services and prevention education

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples

The Seven Generations Child and Family Counseling Services were developed to meet the growing mental health needs of American Indian children, adults, and their families in the County of Los Angeles.

Population(s) Served
Families
Indigenous peoples

The American Indian Clubhouse (AIC), a department within United American Indian Involvement, Inc (UAII), addresses the needs of American Indian youth within our community, ages 5-18. This department is comprised of the AIC after-school and weekend youth group, a high school program (Central High School) administered by the Los Angeles Unified School District, and the Robert Sundance Summer Camp. The vision for the American Indian Clubhouse is to build "Future Healthy Generations” of American Indian youth by creating healthy, smart and well-defined young adults through academic support, recreational opportunities, and culturally-focused activities.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children and youth

Providing quality licensed substance abuse counseling, education, and therapy based on American Indian Culture and Healing

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Adults

The UAII Workforce Development Program, a Workforce Innovations and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Program, is funded by the United States Department of Labor.
Our program and staff strive to make a difference by guiding and encouraging eligible American Indian/Alaska Natives to establish a self-sustaining way of life. We assist in identifying resources that serve as stepping stones towards finding successful careers for AI/AN participants. Our staff provides individualized career counseling to participants to further develop their skills and establish a clear career path that leads to employment or self-sufficiency.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Unemployed people

Where we work

Accreditations

Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC)

Awards

Commendation 2018

County of Los Angeles

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of website pageviews

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Health, Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Over the last 7 days, we have shown an increase in the frequency of the views of the webpage to 678 by 580 unique users. Over the last 30 days, there have been over 2100 page views.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Sexual identity

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the total amount of current followers a majority of which are women ages 35 - 45 years old. In the last 28 days, our post reach has increased to 28,744 and our post engagement is 2780.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

UAII is community driven and actively seeks impact from the community in order to better understand what community members are dealing with and to better prepare for future needs. UAII wants to be the primary resource and service for American Indians and Alaskan Native living in Los Angeles. This means we want to be a safe space for our community members where they can take part in activities , workshops, or receive health services in a place that is inviting and welcoming. Our organization has proven fiscal accountability with implementation of over 70 grants and contracts from federal, state and county resources. We are working to increase our private donor base and corporate giving in order to increase our flexibility to provide services and to expand our organizational savings. We want to also invest in our future leaders by giving them career opportunities and access to positions that are conducive of their skills. UAII also is seeking to build a cohesive workplace work staff satisfaction is consistently improving and growing as staff feel their work matters and is recognized by both the community and their employer.

We want to provide wrap-around services that focus on holistic care for each community member. UAII is equipped to work with community members on achieving positive outcomes in physical, behavioral, and economic health. This is important as we increase the stability of individuals and within families in order to relieve stressors that are obstacles to positive growth and quality of life. UAII will also continue to provide cultural programming and offer a "Native Lens" where our community can feel safe in knowing they always have a place to come to in Los Angeles.

UAII has developed legitimacy within a unique population in the non-profit and health services market. Not only do we have a staff who are trained in western medicine, but also understand the complexities of Native culture and health. For UAII this has proved to be a consistent bridge to overcoming any obstacle to treatment or health education. Our organization seeks to educate and empower our community members so they know they are active participants in their health care.

Recently United American Indian Involvement, Invc. (UAII) has received recognition from both the City and County of Los Angeles for continued work and service to our community. Our organization has continued to grow and expand its available as recently we were awarded funding to establish a new department focused on improving workforce development and training for the American Indian community in Los Angeles. This is tremendous as we understand that physical, mental, and economic health are tied to one another. Also, we seek to change the disparity of an uneducated workforce stuck in entry level positions and change the trajectory of the American Indian worker in the next 4 years. UAII in 2019 will reach it's highest annual projected operating budget and will seek to improve its financial solvency, increase visibility, and seek entrance into private and corporate donors.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Understand that we can focus our fundraising in collaboration with the community members we serve. We have conducted a number of community needs assessments and have begun work to address the concerns that were highlighted within the notes and perspectives shared throughout the discussions.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

UNITED AMERICAN INDIAN INVOLVEMENT
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

UNITED AMERICAN INDIAN INVOLVEMENT

Board of directors
as of 2/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dr. Andrea Garcia

LA County Dept of Mental Health

Term: 2020 - 2022


Board co-chair

Mrs. Heather Torres

Attorney at Law

Term: 2020 - 2022

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/05/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/24/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.