PLATINUM2023

Westside Family Health Center

Care. Compassion. Community.

aka Westside Family Health Center (WFHC)   |   Culver City, CA   |  https://www.wfhcenter.org

Mission

Westside Family Health Center provides comprehensive, high quality, cost effective health care in an educational and supportive environment that empowers patients to take an assertive role in caring for their well-being through all stages of life.

Ruling year info

1976

President / Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Debra A. Farmer

Main address

3861 Sepulveda Boulevard

Culver City, CA 90230 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Westside Women's Health Center

EIN

95-2931931

NTEE code info

Pediatrics (G98)

Ambulatory Health Center, Community Clinic (E32)

Family Planning Centers (E42)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There are more than 48,000 people living in SPA 5 who are both uninsured and low-income (they live at or below 200% of the federal poverty level), and who struggle to survive. This number grows to more than 188,000 when it includes those who are either low-income or uninsured. WFHC sees a high percentage of this population. And this populated needs more essential health services such as oral, vision and mental health care. In 2022, WFHC served 12,309 patients in 34,756 visits. Of those, 37% were uninsured and 98% were living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. Forty-nine percent of patients identified their ethnicity as Latino; 33% were Caucasian, 12% were African American, 3% were Asian and 3% were other. Patients were 72% female, 28% male, and 18% were children.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Family Practice

Our services include, but are not limited to: Adult Physical Exams, Birth Control, Chronic Care Management, Colposcopy, Cryotherapy, Drug Testing, DMV Physicals, Emergency Contraception, Gynecological Exams, HIV Counseling and Testing, Immunizations, Male Services, Mammograms, Menopausal Services, Pap Smears, Pregnancy Testing/Options Counseling, Prenatal Care, Screening specifically for Hearing, Lead Poisoning and Vision, Skin Lesions, STD/STI Testing and Treatment, Tuberculosis Testing, Teen Counseling and Work Physicals. Classes & Support Groups include: Childbirth Classes, Chronic Care Educational Classes, Diabetes Education Classes, Mother/Infant Support Groups, Mother/Toddler Support Groups, MSM Support Groups, Peer Education Classes and Reproductive Health Classes. Other Services include: Breastfeeding Support, Pediatric and Family Literacy, Preceptor and Intern/Extern Programs for Medical Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants and Social Workers and Title X.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Blooming Babies, WFHC's often recognized prenatal program since 1990, provides expectant mothers high quality care from the very beginning of their pregnancy. In addition to prenatal health care and services, we also offer childbirth preparation classes and lactation classes in English and in Spanish.

Population(s) Served
Parents

Since 1992, WFHC has been offering comprehensive pediatric care for the numerous low-income, uninsured families. Young clients are seen by team members sensitive to the needs of children – community health workers, a pediatric nurse practitioner and a family nurse practitioner. Well- and sick-child care, immunizations, tuberculosis testing, referrals, case management services, and mother-child support groups are the mainstay of the pediatrics program. Immunizations and tuberculosis testing are also administered in the community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

WFHC's Community Outreach & Education (COE) program was started in 1994 and is comprised of: Peer Health Educator Training (PHET), bilingual educational presentations, street outreach, HIV prevention support groups for gay males, chronic care management classes, childbirth preparation classes, lactation classes and mother-child support groups in English and in Spanish.

Population(s) Served
Adults

WFHC provides counseling and mental health services for anxiety, depression, grief and loss, stress management, life transition, financial insecurity, cultural identity, and loneliness.

Population(s) Served
Children
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people
At-risk youth
Ethnic and racial groups

Provides comprehensive dental care including screenings, diagnostic imaging, fillings and extractions, oral prophylaxis, fluoride and sealant application and oral health education.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Provides reproductive life planning, family planning for both men and women and gynecological services including pregnancy tests, pap smears, mammograms, birth control methods, emergency contraception, sexually transmitted disease screening including one-on-one counseling and treatment, and anonymous and confidential HIV counseling and testing, as well as services for menopausal women.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults
Adolescents

Where we work

Awards

Patient-Centered Health Home 2013

National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA)

Affiliations & memberships

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 2007

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Diabetes: WFHC will reduce the percentage of adult patients with HbA1c >9% or no test during year to 15%.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Family Practice

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Controlling high blood pressure: WFHC will increase the percentage of patients with HTN controlled <140/90 to 86%.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Family Practice

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Cervical Cancer Screening: WFHC will increase the percentage of women 23-64 years of age who were screened for cervical cancer to 85%.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Family Practice

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Childhood Immunization Status: WFHC will increase percentage of children 2 years of age who received age-appropriate vaccines by their 2nd birthday to 80%.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Prenatal Care: WFHC will increase the percentage of patients who had early entry (first trimester) into prenatal care to 76%

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Prenatal Services: WFHC will decrease the percentage of births less than 2,500 grams to health center patient to 1.6%

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Colorectal cancer screening: WFHC will increase the percentage of patients 50 through 75 years of age who had appropriate screening for colorectal cancer to 35%.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since 1974, WFHC has always had the same ultimate goal for all of our programs - to provide care that is safe, effective, patient-oriented, timely, efficient, and equitable. In doing so we provide a true Patient-Centered Medical Home, and ensure that quality goals are consistent with the national Triple Aim Initiative to improve the patient care experience, improve the health and outcomes of our patient population and reduce per capita costs of patient care.

As a safety net provider and Federally Qualified Health Center, we address the health needs of anyone who walks through our doors (1) by providing comprehensive primary health care services and preventive care along with the necessary enabling and support services required (2) through outreach and education and (3) through community partnerships/collaborations.

Our expertise has always been in our ability to provide health care and health education to underserved populations in a geographical area that is considered affluent. Our community of patients is truly unique. Not only does it contain pockets of poverty, but within the walls of the upscale homes and restaurants that surround us are workers who earn below minimum wage as caregivers, housekeepers, wait staff and kitchen staff. In fact, our patients come from nearly 190 zip codes around Los Angeles County as they may work or go to school on the Westside or they prefer to come to us. We see these patients, their parents and their children regardless of their ability to pay.

In 2021, WFHC worked with Melissa Schoen of Schoen Consulting to create a new strategic plan for the next three years that will guide how WFHC strategically grows and optimizes its performance. WFHC identified 5 areas of focus and strategies for achieving them. I. Maintain High Quality, Patient-Focused Care The strategies include: a. Establish QI priorities and metrics of success b. Seek Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) recognition c. Continue to cultivate a high-quality patient experience including tracking patient experience surveys, patient complaints and patient input to new program development d. Develop and expand technology to support expanded patient access (e.g., telehealth visits, screenings, training/health education offerings, etc.) e. Expand and integrate Behavioral Health services, including Mental Health services f. Establish dental services g. Addition of vision services II. Ensure Financial Stability The strategies include: a. Maximize revenues (e.g., PPS rates, billing processes) b. Develop the financial infrastructure to support enhanced reporting, dashboard development, monitoring and collections c. Determine the ROI of new services and financial needs for expanded services d. Maximize telehealth funding opportunities e. Continue Healthy Futures effort, including board and advisory group support for fundraising III. Optimize the Organizational Infrastructure and Workforce Development The strategies include: a. Maximize operational efficiencies (standard workflow, policies and procedures, communications systems) b. Outline new programs and consider expanded staffing needs and timing of implementation c. Develop and refine the organizational structure to support growth and expansion d. Provide training to maintain and enhance skills (new roles/responsibilities, team development, etc.) e. Advance leadership development and succession planning f. Ongoing focus on recruitment and retention IV. Enhance Market Position, Community Relations and Partnerships The strategies include: a. Maximize Medi-Cal Managed Care membership b. Analyze new market and populations for expanded outreach and services c. Investigate new partnerships and expanding current successful partnerships to support focus areas and priorities (e.g., new populations, expanded services, SDOH) d. Develop marketing and outreach services including branding and collateral development (including online/social media) V. Advance Community Needs through Advocacy The strategies include: a. Promote the value of WFHC and health centers for the community b. Continue to raise awareness of health disparities
c. Build advocacy capacity throughout the organization d. Enhance Board development, fundraising capacity and involvement in advocacy

President/Chief Executive Officer Debra A. Farmer has led a strong management team since 1999. Her skills as a turnaround specialist and a builder of coalitions and collaborations go well beyond WFHC’s walls. During her tenure, she has overseen WFHC's technological advancement and the implementation of electronic health records as well as the expansion of primary health care services as WFHC transitioned from a small women's clinic to a Federally Qualified Health Center and a Patient Centered Health/Medical Home. Her extensive and varied professional path forms the work she does today, but the nonprofit sector has been her home for more than 30 years. She is supported by a Senior Management Team, who have an average of 20 years of experience each, as well as a nine-member Board of Directors. Our Board Chair, Peter Mackler, has nearly two decades of experience of developing health care policy.

Along with skilled leadership, WFHC has more than 50 community partners including Didi Hirsch Mental Health Services, Los Angeles Unified School District, Santa Monica City College, Dignity Health-California Hospital Medical Center, Saint John’s Health Center, and more. We are also actively involved in our community and belong to several organizations, including the California Primary Care Association, the Community Clinic Association of Los Angeles County, the Westside Shelter and Hunger Coalition, the Santa Monica Chamber of Commerce and we are a member of the network of California Health+ Centers. WFHC is currently a part of a large collaborative exploring ways to increase access to specialty care to patients on the Westside of Los Angeles. The group consists of community health centers, hospitals, universities, funders and health plans. In addition we have a strong corps of volunteers, among them, the National Charity League, a national mother-daughter volunteer organization, who volunteer once a month.

WFHC continues to show our capacity to sustain and grow ourselves by remaining flexible. For example, we were one of the first organizations in California to become a Covered California Certified Enrollment Entity in 2013. With all of these evolutions, connections, networks and partnerships, as well as our exceptional leadership team, we are confident that we are utilizing our valuable human and financial resources to implement our strategy efficiently and adapting it when necessary to meet our goals.

WFHC has come a long way since 1974 when we were a small women's clinic with patient charts that could fit into a single box. In April 1, 2020, WFHC began seeing patients at its new site, located at 3861 Sepulveda Boulevard in Culver City. The new site features12,000 square feet of clinic space, 24 exam rooms, 6 consultation rooms, 12,000 square feet of administrative space, and more than 80 parking spaces.

WFHC is focused on offering full telehealth services now in addition to COVID-19 testing, vaccinations, and boosters. WFHC is currently able to administer 200 vaccine doses a week, or 10,000 a year. The dental program was launched in August 2021 and vision services will be launched in 2024. WFHC continues to focus on providing the best care it can, and continues to refine its telehealth program to respond to meet its patients' needs.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Westside Family Health Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Westside Family Health Center

Board of directors
as of 07/20/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Scott Ramer

PriceWaterhouseCoopers

Veronica Lopez

Elizabeth Davila

Carol Ware

Peter Mackler

Teresa Angeles

Stephanie Negriff

Montez Kincy

Curt Degenfelder

Noemi Colmenares,

Rosalinda Meyer

Yheisi Alfaro

Hector Puig

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/20/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/18/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.