Los Angeles Regional Food Bank

Fighting Hunger. Giving Hope.

aka Los Angeles Food Bank/LA Foodbank   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  http://www.lafoodbank.org

Mission

The mission of the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank is to mobilize resources to fight hunger in our community. To fulfill our mission we: - Source and acquire food and other products and distribute to people in need through charitable agencies or directly through programs; - Energize the community to get involved and support hunger relief; - Conduct hunger education and awareness campaigns and advocate for public policies that alleviate hunger. Our vision is that no one goes hungry in Los Angeles County.

Ruling year info

1977

President/CEO

Mr. Michael Flood

Main address

1734 E 41st Street

Los Angeles, CA 90058 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-3135649

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Food insecurity in Los Angeles County has continued to be pervasive. Continued increases in the cost of living, including and especially housing, coupled with stagnant wages, means that hundreds of thousands of families in our communities struggle to put food on the table. One in five people in Los Angeles County experience food insecurity, representing 20% of the population and affecting more than 2 million people. One in four children in Los Angeles County is food insecure.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

BackPack Program

For children who rely on school-sponsored breakfasts and lunches during the week, having enough to eat over the weekend can be a challenge. Our BackPack Program provides enough food for six nutritious meals every Friday during the school year to ensure that at-risk children do not go hungry over the weekend when school meal programs are not available.
In 2020, the Program served 1,205 children at high-need schools in the Los Angeles and Compton Unified School Districts.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Distribution of Food and Grocery Products to more than 600 charitable organizations in our Partner Agency Network throughout Los Angeles County.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Emergency Food Assistance Program (EFAP) provides commodities received from the USDA to low income families and individuals.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) is a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) program which provides monthly food kits to seniors. Each kit weighs approximately 30 pounds and contains mostly shelf-stable staples such as milk, beans, grains and canned fruits and vegetables.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

The Summer Meal Program runs throughout the summer months, providing a nutritious lunch to children who would normally access their midday meal at school. In 2020, the Program served 5,215 children during the summer months, distributing nutritious meals at distribution sites, including Boys and Girls Clubs, summer schools, community centers, the Salvation Army and some libraries. This includes the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), a federally funded nutrition program for children facing hunger during the summer months.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The Mobile Food Pantry serves low-income families in underserved areas throughout Los Angeles County. Food on the refrigerated truck is a combination of produce and perishable goods sourced from the USDA and food donors.

This program also began outreach for college students struggling with food insecurity in 2017.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Food Bank educates children, their families and seniors who participate in our programs about the importance of healthy nutrition and lifestyle choices. We also utilize a food grading system that helps direct our efforts towards the most nutritious foods available.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The CalFresh Outreach Program helps low-income, food-insecure individuals and families gain access to nutritious food through the California Department of Social Services CalFresh Program by helping them navigate every step of the application process. This includes distributing fliers, providing pre-screening service and assisting with application completion and submission.

CalFresh is the new name for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) in California. Formerly known as the Food Stamps Program, this is a federal program run through the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Eligible individuals can apply for CalFresh benefits through an application process through the Los Angeles County Department of Social Services (LADPSS).

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Extra Helpings Program routes perishable and other donated food from grocery stores and other local sources directly to Food Bank partner agencies.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Distribution of Food & Grocery Products

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Through our partner agency network and Food Bank direct distribution programs, the Food Bank serves more than 800,000 individuals each month.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2021, we distributed enough food for 107 million meals. Since its inception in 1973, the Food Bank has distributed more than 1.83 billion pounds of food and product.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Distribution of Food & Grocery Products

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2021, 12,000 volunteers donated their time during 37,000 shifts for a total of 158,000 hours helping on-site at the Food Bank and at food distribution sites.

Amount of food and product donated (in lbs)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Distribution of Food & Grocery Products

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The Food Bank sources donated food from farmers, retailers, manufacturers, processors, food service and the USDA which reduces food waste and provides nutritious food to people seeking assistance.

Amount of food and product purchased (in lbs)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Distribution of Food & Grocery Products

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Due to the spike in the demand for food assistance in 2020 due to the pandemic, the Food Bank significantly increased purchases of food and non-food items to supplement donated inventory.

Value of food and product distributed (in dollars)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Distribution of Food & Grocery Products

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Extra Helpings Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The Extra Helpings Program routes perishable and other donated food from grocery stores and other local sources directly to Food Bank partner agencies.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Distribution of Food & Grocery Products

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Food Bank increased direct service to adults, children and seniors dramatically in 2020 as part of our pandemic response.

Number of unique website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of return website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Nutrition Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2021, the Nutrition Education Program offered 70 education classes and cooking demonstrations for food-insecure families.

Average grant amount

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Average number of dollars received per donor

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of donors retained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average online donation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of new grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since our founding in 1973 by Pasadena resident Tony Collier, we have distributed more than 1.83 billion pounds of food to Los Angeles residents who are at-risk for hunger. We acquire, store, transport and distribute millions of pounds of food every week and we follow the Feeding America standards in doing so.

Our food distribution programs have a year-round timetable. The Food Bank receives bulk items from donors daily, and we store these items in our two warehouses. Staff and volunteers receive training on how to properly sort/glean and process donated food. Perishable food is stored in our refrigerated room.

The Food Bank also receives salvaged food items that are sorted and packed into uniform packages of similar items such as fruit or vegetables, etc. Volunteers and warehouse staff discard products that are not salvageable as set forth by Feeding America guidelines. Salvaged food items are repackaged and moved to our front dock for agency pick-up. A refrigerated truck/trailer is always used when picking up or receiving perishable food. The truck is checked for the correct temperature upon drop-off or pick-up to ensure that perishable foods will be kept at a safe temperature.

Partner agencies schedule regular appointments for food pick-up or delivery. Twenty-four hours before the scheduled pick-up or delivery time, the agency can access a listing of available food from our website, via a recorded phone message or by requesting a faxed list. In addition to pick-ups and deliveries, agencies are able to shop at the Front Dock each weekday between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. and can pick up produce at the weekly Agency Drive-Through.

Our direct service programs include:

Our Children's Nutrition Programs provided healthy breakfasts, after-school meals, summer lunches, weekend meals, and bags of fresh produce to more than 12,800 food-insecure children throughout Los Angeles County.

The Food Bank’s Senior Nutrition Programs provides nutritious food to more than 80,400 low-income seniors, including pandemic-related home delivery for many.

The Nutrition Education Program engaged facilitated 70 classes in 2021 for food-insecure individuals and families, including cooking demonstrations. The Program empowers and inspires participants to prepare healthy meals at home using ingredients distributed through the Food Bank’s programs.

The CalFresh Outreach Program helped low-income individuals gain access to nutritious food through the California Department of Social Services CalFresh Program. We distributed 62,622 CalFresh flyers and assisted clients in submitting 956 CalFresh applications.

The Mobile Food Pantry served 212,687 people, distributing more than 11 million pounds of food.

The Extra Helpings Program rescued 22.5 million of pounds of food that would otherwise go to waste and distributed it to those in need. In 2021, the Program connected 165 partner agencies to donated food from 251 local donors.

Our strategies to alleviate hunger in our community include serving as a clearinghouse for a network of more than 600 partner agencies located throughout Los Angeles County. By acquiring food through bulk food purchases and soliciting surplus from all sectors of the food and hospitality industries, we are able to handle large-scale donations and bulk food purchases that our smaller partner agencies would be unable to accept. In 2021, the Food Bank distributed 131 million pounds of food and 2.6 million pounds of non-food products. 96% of the food distributed is rated as nutritious.

Partner agencies include food pantries, soup kitchens, senior centers, youth centers, homeless shelters, churches and other community-based organizations. Approximately 24 percent of the people served by these agencies are 0-17 years of age, 58 percent are 18-64 years of age and 18 percent are 65 years and older.

In addition to our General Food Distribution program through our more than 600 partner agencies and our Fresh Produce Distribution program, which comprises nearly 20% of all distributions, the Food Bank also operates its own direct service programs from 151 additional program sites, including nutrition programs for children and seniors, nutrition education, CalFresh food stamp outreach and a Mobile Food Pantry Program.

The Food Bank is a member of Feeding America, the California Association of Food Banks, and locally, Emergency Network of Los Angeles (ENLA), Los Angeles County's Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD).

The essential functions of the Food Bank include the acquisition, storage, transportation and distribution of millions of pounds of food every month through our more than 600 partner agencies. In a typical month before the Coronavirus Pandemic, the Food Bank provided food to 300,000 adults, seniors and children through our partner agency network and Food Bank direct distribution programs. The number of people served has increased markedly and is now estimated to be at more than 800,000 people served over the course of a month.
The Food Bank's direct service programs serve children and seniors every month, and our Nutrition Continuum programs, which seek to address the underlying health, education and policy issues related to hunger.

As providers of millions of pounds in annual food assistance, we take our responsibility to distribute food that is safe and healthy very seriously. To that end, our Fund also supports capital needs and facility improvements related to food safety.

The Food Bank has made it a priority to ensure that people at-risk for hunger receive healthy, nutritious food. We have implemented a rating system that allows us to track our food solicitation efforts and decisions regarding food purchases to ensure that we acquire the most nutritious foods available. In 2019, 80 percent of the food distributed through the Food Bank achieved a 'high' or 'good' nutritional value rating.

In 2021, our staff was supported by 12,000 volunteers who gave 158,000 hours of service to the Food Bank. Through their efforts, we distributed 131 million pounds of food to our partner agencies and direct service programs.

We currently work with more than 600 partner agencies (i.e., food pantries, soup kitchens, senior centers, youth centers, homeless shelters, faith-based organizations, and community centers) across Los Angeles County to distribute food to those in need. The Food Bank is a member of Feeding America and the California Association of Food Banks. We also partner with the local chapter of the American Red Cross to respond in the event of a major disaster.

The Food Bank acquires food by soliciting surplus food items from all sectors of the food and hospitality industries and by making bulk purchases. Through these sources, we are able to accept, store and distribute food on a scale that would overwhelm our smaller partner agencies.

We serve all of Los Angeles County, which has the largest food insecure population of any county in the nation (1.4 million people). Every month the Food Bank serves 800,000 food-insecure individuals. Of the clients we serve, 24 percent are children under the age of 18, and 18 percent are seniors aged 60 and above.

In 2021, our Program Operating Fund objectives continued to meet the Coronavirus pandemic response and corresponding economic fallout. The number of people served has increased markedly and is now estimated to be at more than 800,000 people served over the course of a month. Food distribution has increased by 110% compared to the pre-pandemic period. 310 million pounds of food, the equivalent of 250 million meals, have been distributed since the crisis started in March 2020, including more than 4 million emergency food boxes distributed to families and individuals (12 million individuals served in total) through partner agencies, direct “Drive Through” and Mobile Food Pantry distributions, school districts and other partnerships.

Financials

Los Angeles Regional Food Bank
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Los Angeles Regional Food Bank

Board of directors
as of 08/19/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Whitney Jones Roy

Gary Kirkpatrick

G&R Holdings

Mark Stegemoeller

Lathan & Watkins (Retired)

Whitney Jones Roy

Sheppard, Mullin, Richter, & Hampton LLP

James Thomson

RAND Corporation (Retired)

David Bishop

David Bishop Media

Justin Toner

Capital Group

Susan Leonard

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (retired)

James Beaubien

Latham & Watkins LLP

Robert Perille

Shamrock Capital Advisors (Retired)

Michael Montgomery

Montgomery Advisory, LLC

Michael Flood

Los Angeles Regional Food Bank

Dean Hallett

Hallett Leadership

Dylan Jadeja

Riot Games

Jordan Kruse

Oaktree Capital Management

Silvano Merlo

Marriott International

Abhilash Patel

Entrepreneur and Investor

Keith Addis

Industry Entertainment Partners

Meredith Hightower

HBO Entertainment

Robert Kronfli

Bacari Restaurants

Felix Recht

Transom Consulting Group

Cary Rubinstein

Union Bank

Karen Corman

Skadden

Linda Hoos

University of Southern California

Ron Frierson

Amazon

Todd Solash

AIG

Denise Woods, DrPH

UC Riverside

Lena Al-Sarraf, DO

Asian Pacific Health Care Venture, Inc.

Karen Sessions

Bank of America

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/30/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/30/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.