Casa Youth Shelter

A warm bed. A hot meal. A safe place to stay.

Los Alamitos, CA   |  www.casayouthshelter.org

Mission

Casa Youth Shelter serves and nurtures youth in crisis with shelter, counseling, and support services, empowering them to come through their crisis with increased confidence, stability, and tools for continued growth. We envision a community where all adolescents in crisis have a safe place to stay, in an environment that promotes personal growth and healthy relationships.

Notes from the nonprofit

In June 2021, we were honored to be recognized for our work as the 2021 Nonprofit of the Year by California State Senator Tom Umberg representing District 34, which spans Long Beach, Anaheim, Santa Ana, and Huntington Beach.

Ruling year info

1982

Principal Officer

Ms. Amy Lakin

Main address

10911 Reagan Street

Los Alamitos, CA 90720 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-3218061

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Citizenship Programs, Youth Development (O54)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

It is estimated that there are between 1.3 to 1.7 million youth in the United States who experience one night of homelessness a year, with 550,000 of the youth being homeless for a week or longer. The Voice of Youth County report from the University of Chicago echoes the prevalence of runaway and homeless youth: one in 30 youth under the age of 18 experiences homelessness in any given year. The 2019 Orange County Point-In-Time count further estimates 26%, or 1,783, of its runaway and homeless are under the age of 18. The regional rise in youth homelessness has a further impact: harm to a youth’s emotional well-being. The 27th Annual Report on the Conditions of Children in Orange County identifies housing, behavioral health, child welfare, and child poverty as four of the focus areas with worsening trends over the last 10 years. Youth mental health and substance abuse hospitalization rates grew 88% over the past 10 years.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Residential Shelter Care Program

Casa Youth Shelter's Residential Shelter Care Program is run on a 24-hour schedule – our home is always open with awake staff on duty so that any youth who find themselves on the streets at any hour can seek shelter with us. We provide immediate shelter to youth who are homeless, abused or have runaway from home, offering residents amenities including 12 licensed beds, meals, on-site professional counseling, case management services, and customized education services. Our Residential Shelter Care Program also provides comprehensive counseling services (individual, group, and family) to our shelter residents and their families - clients who have historically lacked access to clinical mental health treatment. We also offer a series of parenting instruction in both Spanish and English designed to encourage effective parenting techniques and to strengthen relationships between family members.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Casa Youth Shelter’s Youth Leadership Program (YLP) provides peer-to-peer and community-based outreach, while also developing leadership skills and fostering community engagement in young people. The program is designed for high school students and offers personal growth through community service, volunteer activities, and public awareness:
* Peer support – YLP members network with local schools to assist in identifying helpful resources for students on their campus.
* Awareness – YLP members champion many important issues facing youth today. Members then educate, advocate, and collaborate with local community members to spread awareness. Casa Youth Shelter sponsors Club Casa, a school-based club that raises awareness on issues impacted youth in their schools.
* Community Outreach – Our program encourages young people to become valuable contributing members of their community, stressing the importance of giving back and making an impact. Community activities vary and include monthly visits to local motels serving as homes to families on the brink of homelessness.
* Prevention Activities – YLP members participate in activities where they can spread awareness on concerns that can have an impact of the crisis that might lead to homelessness and running away, like mental health, bullying, and abuse.
* Program Design, Planning and Management – Who can better understand and help direct needed services for youth than members of their own peer group? YLP involves young leaders in the development and implementation of our programs and services.
* Special Event Coordination – YLP members participate in Casa Youth Shelter events as well as develop and sponsor their own support activities, such as the Youth Leadership Conference.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Casa Youth Shelter provides our community with a variety of crisis-prevention programs and family outreach programs including: violence intervention and prevention programs to students and their families in over twenty middle schools and high schools across six different school districts. In addition, Casa Youth Shelter is a member of the Anaheim Collaboration to Assist Motel Families and pays monthly visits to local motels to provide food, clothing, school supplies and other basic necessities to needy families.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Families

Where we work

Awards

Nonprofit of the Year 2021

CA District 34

Affiliations & memberships

Orange County Funders Roundtable 2013

The Nonprofit Partnership 2016

Long Beach Human Trafficking Coalition 2018

Youth Collaboratory 2019

Long Beach Chamber of Commerce 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of therapy hours provided to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Caregivers, Families, Parents

Related Program

Residential Shelter Care Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Total counseling hours provided includes individual, family, and group therapy session hours.

Maintain a minimum 75% "Successful or Satisfactory" exit rate

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Residential Shelter Care Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This percentage measures the frequency our residents achieve their individual case plan goals and are able to exit our shelter no longer in crisis.

Percentage of youth attending or graduated high school or working on their GED after exiting our Residential Shelter Care Program.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Residential Shelter Care Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This rate measures youth's understanding of how staying on their educational path increases their ability to achieve long-term success.

Youth reporting permanent connections.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Residential Shelter Care Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Maintain a minimum 90% of youth at exit who report at least one supportive adult, outside program staff, in their life as a permanent connection.

Percentage of youth exiting our Residential Shelter Care Program into safe housing.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Residential Shelter Care Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This rate measures the change in attitudes, increased knowledge, and practice of new behaviors that result in a successful exit to safe and stable housing.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Casa Youth Shelter serves and nurtures youth in crisis with shelter, counseling, and support services, empowering them to come through their crisis with increased confidence, stability, and tools for continued growth. We envision a community where all adolescents in crisis have a safe place to stay, in an environment that promotes personal growth and healthy relationships. Our primary objective is to prevent and end youth homelessness for youth in crisis.

Our services focus on preventing and ending youth homelessness in two ways: first, we stop the immediate emergency of homelessness by giving them safe and stable shelter, along with food, comfort, and counseling to develop their well-being and coping skills. We provide tutoring, social and emotional support through therapy, and positive youth development through our staff and volunteers. Second, we connect them with long-term services that we do not directly provide so they may continue to develop their social and emotional well-being, permanent connections, education/employment, and secure housing when they are no longer with us.

Fundamentally, our work reflects the values and priority we place on individuals, teamwork, personal development, family, and the strength found in community. Our adult and teen volunteers, Board of Directors, and staff understand the youth and families that seek our help are not defined by their situation; rather, we believe that everyone deserves and has a right to be treated with dignity and respect.

Since our founding in 1978, Casa Youth Shelter has been committed to helping youth and families address their concerns, through shelter, and with counseling, outreach, and case management services. Our highly-trained staff of 44 (9 full-time, 34 part-time), and 55 volunteers are deeply dedicated to providing a safe, warm, home-like environment for our youth around the clock.

As the only 24/7 full-service youth-specific emergency shelter between Huntington Beach and Culver City open to the public, we provide 12 licensed beds, a counseling center, recreation room, giving library, and computer lab. We have a strong reputation and have cultivated relationships with community partners that speak to our long-term strength. Our committed 22-member Board of Directors represents a wide variety of business and community interests; many have been involved in CYS for decades because the impact of our work has continued to inspire their advocacy.

The long term, intended outcomes for Casa Youth Shelter's Residential Shelter Care program are for residents to develop permanent connections, display self-sufficiency, feel a sense of well-being and live in an environment of safety.

In 2019, Casa Youth Shelter provided 2,351 shelter days and 5,901 hours of combined counseling and education services to 241 residents. As a result of those counseling hours, 80% successfully exited to safe and stable housing. Furthermore, 81% of residents and their families took part in aftercare counseling. Further, 91% of our 241 residents reported an exit disposition of "Satisfactory or Successful", meaning they exited our shelter out of crisis and meeting many if not all of their individualized treatment plan goals. A combined total of 13,552 community outreach hours were spent providing youth education, public awareness, parent education and basic needs services.

In the last few years, we have seen an increase in crisis calls to our shelter from youth and/or families who are in crisis but cannot or will not enter our Residential Shelter Program. The ongoing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have only further exacerbated the social, emotional and behavioral health-related needs and every-day challenges faced by at-risk youth in crisis and in danger of homelessness.

In October 2021, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and the Children’s Hospital Association joined to declare “a national emergency” in youth mental health. Furthermore, in December 2021, the US Surgeon General issued a report warning that youth are facing devastating mental health effects, including significant increases of self-report of depression, anxiety, and emergency room visits for mental health challenges. Emergency room visits for suicide attempts rose 51 percent for adolescent girls in early 2021 as compared to the same period in 2019. The figure rose 4 percent for boys.

In response to the pandemic as well as the urgent need for youth-focused mental health care, CYS has extended counseling and case management services to youth and families outside of our residential program, and we will continue to provide these services throughout the pandemic and beyond. In the last year, we were able to serve an additional 57 youth and their families who were not utilizing our shelter program.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    CYS measures the success of its programs using resident treatment plans, exit interviews, case management records, and ongoing case management meetings with former residents. Each resident’s individualized Master Treatment Plan, which is developed after their first counseling session and modified throughout their stay in collaboration with counselors and the youth, serves as an important tool to track personal as well as programmatic progress and success.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We adjusted our intake phone call protocols based on feedback.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.),

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Casa Youth Shelter
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Casa Youth Shelter

Board of directors
as of 1/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Greg Magnuson

Sandra McElroy

Community Volunteer

Karen Klabouch

Designer, Green Street Interiors

Emil Jorge

Co-Founder, Cardraising

Judy Klabouch

CEO, Green Street Interiors

David Basok

Product Specialist-Tax, Wolters Kluwer Law & Business

Kevin Boylan

Consultant, Business Management

Kenny Brandyberry

Investor, Business Owner

Gina Cappannelli

Owner, Hotel Villa Portofino, Catalina Island

Chief Eric Nunez

Los Alamitos Police Department

Tom Bussa

Retired, Ernst and Young

Kathryn Partis

Consultant, Broadcast Media

Nesi Stewart

Owner, Printmaster

Nasir Tejani, MD

Neonatology/Pediatrics

Luciann Maulhardt

Director Emeritus

Greg Magnuson

Buena Park School District

Kent Clayton

COO, Los Alamitos Medical Center

Nicole Madison

Executive Director, Wester Insurance Administrators

Kelly Perry

Perry Wealth Management

Corrie Burks

Senior Relationship Manager/Vice President, City National Bank

Steve Ellis

Partner, Rutan Tucker LLP

John Arens

Financial Advisor, Edward Jones

Susan Morales

Director of Mrketing, Los Alamitos Medical Center

Erick Manriquez

Southland Credit Union

John Freeborn

Director of Broker/Dealer Sales, RK Properties

Thomas Jeschke

Director, PricewaterhouseCoopers

Chynna Canizares

Talent Consultant, PricewaterhouseCoopers

Michael melchor

Branch Manager, U.S. Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/12/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data