PLATINUM2024

Open Paths Counseling Center

Inglewood, CA   |  www.openpaths.org

Mission

Open Paths mission is to meet the evolving health care needs of the community through quality counseling for individuals and families at affordable fees; free therapy programs for at-risk children and youth in local schools; and a highly-regarded therapist training program.

Ruling year info

1979

Executive Director

Ms. Sierra Smith

Main address

301 N. Prairie Ave. Ste 510

Inglewood, CA 90301 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-3221061

NTEE code info

Community Mental Health Center (F32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

When people of means experience crisis, trauma, depression, anxiety, stress, etc. most are able to afford the $100 - $300 per hour session fee through their insurance or out of pocket and is typically provided by someone who is culturally similar. For people who are low-income, psychotherapy is generally unavailable due to lack of insurance and prohibitively high fees. Even when counseling is affordable, low-income people of color are often met with therapists who may not understand the cultural nuances of the communities they come from, or the chronic stress affiliated with financial insecurity. Open Paths Counseling Center fills this gap by ensuring that our clinicians culturally represent and understand the dynamics of the multitude of communities in Greater Los Angeles. This is done by recruiting clinicians with lived experience and/or a deep interest in serving under-resourced and marginalized communities. Services are provided in English and Spanish.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Open Paths Counseling Services

This program provides culturally sensitive individual, couples and family therapy at our Center. We use a sliding scale fee structure based on each client's household net inccome to determine an affordable fee for people who are under or uninsured and would not otherwise have access to therapy.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Another Way is a thirty year old domestic violence intervention program that believes that the only way to fundamentally disrupt the cycle of violence is to work with both people who are abusive as well as people who are abused. We provide individual, couples (when safe), and family therapy, as well as 52-week probation approved psycho-educational Batterer Intervention Groups, Anger Management Groups, Empowerment Groups for people who have been abused. All services are offered in English and Spanish.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our Therapy Outreach Program is designed to remove the barrier of location by providing therapy to people in their communities. We do this by strategically partnering with organizations that are already serving in low-income, under-served communities and sending culturally similar therapists to their locations to provide therapy for our shared clientele. This eases the burden of geography for clients who would have difficulty making it to our location weekly.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Therapy is provided on-site to under-resourced public and charter schools in Los Angeles to meet the therapeutic needs of at-risk students.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Open Paths' Clinical Training Program provides culturally sensitive clinical training and supervision on a weekly basis to pre-licensed clinicians. Clinicians serve low-income clients under the guidance and supervision of highly experienced therapists who understand the cultural nuances of the communities and clientele we serve. This program includes opportunities for specialized training as well, such as training in EMDR and a six-month intensive trauma training program, above and beyond the weekly clinical trainings provided.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Betty Humphrey Equity Champion Award 2022

Mental Health America

Affiliations & memberships

Culver City Commendation 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of counseling sessions performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number of therapists in our program dropped from 2021 to 2023, as many of the students entering graduate programs in 2020 decided to postpone their education due to the pandemic.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Open Paths Counseling Center seeks to remove financial, geographic and cultural barriers to psychotherapy for historically marginalized and under-invested communities in Los Angeles' therapy deserts. We do this by providing culturally-affirming, trauma informed psychotherapy for either free or for a low-fee at our Inglewood-based center, virtually using Telehealth, or at partner organizations and schools.

In addition to providing much needed mental health services in Los Angeles' therapy deserts, Open Paths Counseling Center also runs a highly sought after clinical training program. Our program recruits pre-licensed therapists who are aligned with the communities we serve, and trains them through a culturally-affirming lens. Our clinical training program centers around the needs of BIPOC clients and those who have historically not been centered in the field of psychology.

In 2017 Open Paths launched our Community Partnership Therapy Program (CPTP). CPTP partners with social service and educational organizations in under-invested communities by providing therapists from these communities to serve a shared clientele. This strategy removes the top three barriers to therapy for members of these communities by providing culturally affirmative therapy, at low or no fee, in communities where therapy is not readily available, by therapists who are culturally similar to the clients in these communities. By continuing to build out our Community Partnership Therapy Program, we will eliminate the therapy deserts that have historically permeated Los Angeles' communities of color, while breaks down mental health stigmas and barriers.

By centering the needs of Los Angeles' therapy deserts throughout our programs, services and training, Open Paths Counseling Center has become a highly regarded clinical training agency, attracting top therapists of color from local, highly regarded universities. Our diverse team of clinical supervisors, as well as pre-licensed therapists (many of whom provide services in Spanish and other languages, as well as English) makes us the first choice for may community-based organizations seeking therapy services for their clientele.

Since Open Paths launched our Community Partnership Therapy Program in 2017, we have partnered with many local organizations and schools in underserved parts of Los Angeles. Organizational partners include:

Social Justice Learning Institute
Lennox School District (5 elementary schools and 1 middle school)
St. Margaret's Center
Hope Housing for Students
Good Shepherd Shelter
New Opportunities Organization
The Landing
Women's Leadership Project
Young Eisner Scholars
LA Phil's Youth Orchestra Los Angeles (YOLA) - Inglewood

Open Paths Counseling Center is also the proud recipient of Mental Health America's 2022 Betty Humphrey Equity Champion Award.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently

Financials

Open Paths Counseling Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Open Paths Counseling Center

Board of directors
as of 03/12/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Martin Watt

Matt Rosen, Esq.

Partner - Stone, Genow, Smelkinson, Binder & Christopher, LLP

Carter Armstrong

Sr. VP Music at Warner Bros. Pictures

Dr. Martin Watt, PhD

Software Engineer at Google

Sandy Lee

COO at Antioch University Los Angeles

Gina Deutsch-Zakarin, LMFT

Marriage and Family Therapist in Private Practice

Daveon Swan

Assistant Dean of Admissions, USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance

Elizabeth Zamudio

V.P. of Education, Unidos US

Dr. Patrice Le Goy, PhD, LMFT

Private Practice

Shakira Gagnier

Operating Partner | DEI, Lightbay Capital

Christopher Miller

Senior Manager, PwC

Lorena Gonzalez

Senior V.P., City National Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/12/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/27/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.