MANNA CONEJO VALLEY FOOD BANK

To Feed Hungry People in the Conejo Valley

aka Manna Conejo Valley Food Bank/ Manna Conejo Valley Food Pantry/ Manna   |   Thousand Oaks, CA   |  www.mannaconejo.org

Mission

"To feed hungry people in the Conejo Valley"

Ruling year info

1979

Executive Director

Leanne Portzel

Main address

Po Box 1114

Thousand Oaks, CA 91358 USA

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EIN

95-3413415

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Food Pantry

A choice-model pantry that allows clients to choose from a wide variety of pantry items rather than receive a pre-packaged bag or box. This method promotes not only a strong sense of dignity among clients, but is an effective distribution method because clients choose food items they know and like. Manna clients can visit the pantry twice a month and leave with an average of 120 lbs of food.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people
People with disabilities
Adults

Basic needs food bags filled with easy open, non-perishable food items are pre-bagged and made ready for quick distribution in emergency situations.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people
Adults
People with disabilities

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Better Business Bureau

United Way Member Agency

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Manna's goal is to maintain annual distribution levels at or above 400,000 pounds per year, while strengthening our distribution system to address unmet need, engage the community through outreach and education; maintain organizational and financial stability, and encourage innovation to create a stronger food insecurity safety net.

To accomplish this goal, Manna is focused on its current capital campaign to raise funds to purchase a larger facility and outfit it properly so it can receive, process and distribute in increased food we are capable of acquiring.

Additionally, Manna is committed to increasing the quantity of nutritionally rich foods to enhance the health of our seniors and more vulnerable clients, through partnerships with senior programs, health programs and outreach to youth programs that focus on low-income children.

Our goal is to create vibrant partnerships to efficiently move food into the hands, and onto the tables, of vulnerable families so that they can put a warm hearty meal on the table instead of going without.

Manna's strategy fulfill its goal is to increase collaborations with all six cities in our service area and to successfully complete its capital campaign to boost the collection and distribution of food to those who need it most. We will do this by:

Creating & Strengthening Food Rescue Partnerships: Manna collects food via a network of retail rescue programs, farmer's markets, community gardens and home gardens, collecting an average of 20,000 pounds of food each month that would otherwise go to waste. In 2015, over 1,500 food drives were conducted to collect non-perishable foods for our pantry. Lastly, Manna has built cooperative relationships with local meat suppliers in order to purchase quality protein, at reduced prices, to augment what we receive from rescue programs.

Sort & Inventory Food: All food donations come to our facility and is weighed, sorted, inspected and put into inventory rotation. In any given month we have approximately 60,000 pounds of food on hand. Our current capital campaign will maximize the efficiency of food processing and warehousing with a larger facility.

Food Distribution: Manna consistently serves over 18,000 people each year. In the new facility we will be able to increase the number of distribution days/hours, and implement much needed evening hours to accommodate working clients. We will be able to partner with local senior programs to meet the needs of home bound seniors through a mobile food distribution program. Lastly, we will partner with local medical outreach programs to deliver food during their medical clinics, thereby serving more food to more people in need in our community.

Complete Capital Campaign: After a thoughtful strategic planning process and feasibility study to determine the best course of action, Manna's Board of Directors announced its decision to embark on a $2.5 million capital campaign to secure a larger facility.

To date, we are engaged to purchase a 3,100 square foot building near our current location. The new facility will include a client in-take/waiting area, larger food pantry, on-site warehousing, commercial grade cold storage, a dedicated receiving area, an educational classroom/meeting room, and staff offices.

Manna's new home will significantly broaden and strengthen the food insecurity safety net for the most vulnerable in our area. With a facility 4.5 times larger than our current space, which offers improved access for both client and donor, we will be able to:

•Double the frequency of food distribution to clients.

•Extend pantry distribution days and hours.

•Serve more clients in the pantry at any given time.

•Reduce stress and support client dignity with shorter wait times in an environment that is sensitive to their emotional as well as basic needs.

•Reach out to those who are unable to access the food pantry.

•Attract more volunteers and partners like philanthropic groups and retailers who have food donations programs.

Operating since 1971, Manna has become the Conejo Valley's oldest and most respected hunger relief organization. We have built a strong relationship with community partners, businesses and corporations, schools, service and faith-based organizations, and volunteers, who donate food, work the pantry, sort and organize food, and pick-up rescued food six-days a week. At FY2015/2016, the community had donated close to 400,000 pounds of food, an increase over the previous fiscal year.

Through community partnerships, 97% of all distributed food is donated or rescued by the community, with protein being the only purchased item. Overhead costs run 7% of budget so that more money goes directly to programs and services, thereby helping more people in need more often.

Manna is unique in the realm food panties. We do not just distribute food to families on scheduled pantry days, but we actively solicit, pick-up, process and inventory thousands of pounds of food each week, making us a hybrid between a food bank and a food pantry. For more than four decades our community has wholeheartedly supported this model, which has made us the largest pantry in the area. At the completion of our capital campaign we will have a larger pantry, receiving and processing area, and more warehouse space, firmly positioning ourselves to serve the community for the next 45 years.

Since 2012, we have increased the number of food drives, pounds of perishable foods rescued, and food distributed by 61.47%. With a larger facility we will be able to rescue more food, partner on more food drives and collaborate with more organizations to reach the unmet need in our area.

Our $2.5 million capital campaign was launched in April 2016 with financial commitments of $600,000, setting a solid foundation to strategically receive more food, store and inventory more food, distribute more food and to accommodate more volunteers and more clients.

The focus of our expansion will continue to be acquiring foods rich in nutrition, fresh produce and quality dairy and meat items. The role Manna can play in improving health through better nutrition is becoming more and more important as our community ages. We have the ability to have a positive impact on people's lives through senior programs, medical and dental outreach programs and quality of life programs.

Financials

MANNA CONEJO VALLEY FOOD BANK
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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MANNA CONEJO VALLEY FOOD BANK

Board of directors
as of 09/27/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Darin Arrasmith

Jane Rosner

Doctor of Audiology/Owner of West Valley Hearing Center

Veronica Ellias

Laritech, Inc

Karen Ingram

Director, Community Services, Lanterman Regional Center

Aaron Podell

VP Banking Services Manager

Russell Smith

Business Consultant

Cameron Parton

Director, Food Services, La Reina High School

Kyle Lundberg

Financial Advisor, Edward Jones

David Masci

Attorney

Leanne Portzel

Exec Director, Manna

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/27/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data