Orangewood Foundation

Santa Ana, CA   |  www.orangewoodfoundation.org

Mission

The mission of Orangewood Foundation is to prepare foster and community youth to reach their greatest potential.

Ruling year info

1981

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Chris Simonsen

Main address

1575 E 17th Street

Santa Ana, CA 92705 USA

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Formerly known as

Orangewood Children's Foundation

EIN

95-3616628

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Samueli Academy

Samueli Academy was opened on August 22nd, 2013 to further meet our goal of helping foster and community youth graduate from high school and gain the skills necessary to enter the workforce.  By using project-based learning and incorporating a work-based learning program, we hope to better equip teens with the skills needed for adulthood.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

ALL Orangewood programs work together to build a strong foundation for adulthood for Orange County's children, teens and youth who have been in the foster care system.  Orangewood Resource Center (ORC) offers emotional support, a hot meal, clothing, groceries, phone and computer. About 50% of ORC youth are homeless.Mentoring offers youth support and guidance.  Scholarships send foster youth to college. Grants provide children and teens in foster care with the "extras". Rising Tide Communities is a comprehensive housing program to help former foster youth gain the life skills needed for independent living. Housed at two apartment complexes and one home, Beverly's House, and the Lighthouse for victims of sex trafficking.  Independent Living Program is 1-1 support and workshops teaching skills for life after age 18. Full Service Partnership helps teens and young adults with intensive and individual support needed to achieve a stable, productive life.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of foster youth with housing arrangements

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Orangewood provides transitional housing with supportive services to former foster youth through four locations in Orange County, plus referrals to other agencies.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Orangewood holds workshops in the areas of relationships and daily living, education, employment, and more. These workshops are for youth in the foster care system and those who have recently aged out

Hours of mentoring

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Health & Wellness, Housing, LIfe Skills & Employment, Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Orangewood pairs caring adult mentors with current and former foster youth.

Number of college scholarships provided to former foster youth

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of advanced studies scholarships provided to former foster youth

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Bags of groceries provided to former foster youth

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Health & Wellness, Housing, LIfe Skills & Employment, Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Orangewood's on-site resource center helps youth with basic needs such as groceries, toiletries, hot meals and laundry facilities.

Hot meals served to former foster youth

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Health & Wellness, Housing, LIfe Skills & Employment, Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Orangewood's on-site resource center helps youth with basic needs such as groceries, toiletries, hot meals and laundry facilities.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Orangewood Foundation was created in 1981 to build an emergency shelter for children from our community who were being abused. After the shelter was finished it was deeded to the County of Orange and we turned our attention to meeting the ongoing needs of vulnerable youth. For 37 years, Orangewood has supported youth who are living with foster parents, kindship families, or in group homes. Today, Orangewood is driven by its mission “to prepare foster and community youth to reach their greatest potential”. While we still maintain a focus on helping youth from foster care, we have broadened our scope to include youth who might never have been in formal foster care but are in great need our services (educationally at-risk youth, sex trafficking victims, and homeless young people). Today about 75% of our clients are from foster care. Our vision statement, “all youth are given the opportunity to thrive and prosper”, describes exactly what we aim to accomplish.

Far too many young people leave foster care without a home or adults to help them transition into independent living. They are unable to pay for college, find a job, or secure a safe place to live. They lack education, guidance and basic life skills. This is also true of non-foster youth who come from families plagued by poverty and homelessness. These young people are at high risk of tragic outcomes including homelessness, poverty, unplanned pregnancies, incarceration, and substance abuse.

To address these critical issues, our strategies involve four key service areas: Health & Wellness, Housing, Life Skills & Employment, and Education. Orangewood provides the comprehensive programs including: affordable housing, educational scholarships, mental health support, skill building workshops, a drop-in center (Project CHOICE) and safe housing for CSEC youth (Commercially Sexually Exploited Children), adult and peer mentors, and a resource center for homeless youth that provides home cooked meals, medical care, group and individual counseling, referrals to housing and jobs, and case management.

All of our programs have adopted what we call the "Orangewood Way", a strengths-based, trauma-informed, respectful way of viewing the young people that we serve as resourceful `and so much more than just their present circumstances. We believe that our strategies are fairly unique and a bit more comprehensive than many youth services agencies. We use a care model that is known among service providers as “low-threshold”. We do not require traumatized, hurting youth to immediately comply with a rule-oriented program. This approach doesn’t work in the long term. It often reinforces a belief in the youth that they cannot succeed, they are fundamentally flawed, and people cannot be trusted. We don’t want to re-traumatize an already frightened youth by setting them up to fail and feel rejected, but instead extend unconditional love and use a much more grace filled, forgiving approach. Youth can visit for a hot meal, a shower, or just to talk with a caring adult until they feel safe enough to request more solution-oriented help, such as housing. We have respect for the unique path each of our young clients is taking, and the time they need to build trust in us. Rather than try to direct their steps, we offer to accompany them, providing support and guidance on the way.

Orangewood has evolved into a respected leader among Southern California’s providers of direct services for vulnerable, at-risk youth. Orangewood is deeply grateful for a high level of community support and strong collaborative partnerships. Our capabilities are enhanced through relationships with the Orange County Social Services Agency, Orange County Department of Children and Family Services, the County Board of Supervisors, and other local agencies. Orangewood is a member of the Orange County Alliance for Children and Families, Orange County Human Trafficking Task Force, Juvenile Branch Blue Ribbon Committee on services to Dependent and Delinquent Youth, the Foster Youth Outcome committee, and the Juvenile Justice Commission. Orangewood has been awarded the County’s only Independent Living Program contract every year since 1998.

Orangewood benefits from truly outstanding Volunteer support. Our volunteer base is made up of both dedicated individuals and corporate groups who provide grants, in-kind gifts, services and special event support. Without our volunteers, our influence in the community and ability to carry out our mission would be significantly diminished. Additionally, two auxiliaries, "44 Women", started by Susan Samueli, and "PALS", provide valuable, ongoing support.

Orangewood is led by a very strong Board of Directors made up of 43 community leaders. Our Board is very active, providing governance, strategic direction, supervision and fundraising, and is organized into eight regular committees: Program, Ambassador/Fund Development, Governance, Executive, Audit, Investment, Finance, and Marketing. Two additional committees meet only as needed, the Compensation Committee and Rising Tide Committee. The Board relies on program outcomes and data provided by program directors, as well as feedback from the youth we serve, in order to lead our strategic planning.

Every year, our team of dedicated staff and volunteers directly serve about 2,000 young people; this number includes the 500 students enrolled at Samueli Academy. At Orangewood Foundation, progress is part of our culture - both programmatically and organizationally. Even though we are an established organization, we don’t “rest on our laurels.” We constantly evolve and adapt our services to better address the needs of our community’s youth.

For twenty years, Orangewood produced the Conditions of Children Report for our county and continues to be a contributor to the document. Orangewood operated several Community Programs, including FaCT, from 1994 until 2016. During this time, significant progress was made in the prevention of child abuse through Family Resource Centers around the County. In 2016 Orangewood made the decision not to seek more community service contracts; we decided to focus on what we do best: providing direct services for vulnerable youth. In 2013 Orangewood opened Samueli Academy, a tuition-free, charter high school for foster youth and educationally at-risk teens. It is now an award-winning school with a long waiting list each year! In response to the high percentage of young women being trafficked who as children were in foster care, Orangewood opened The Lighthouse in 2016, a transitional housing program to support this specific population. In 2017, Orangewood was selected to receive a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the State of California to expand our onsite Resource Center to better serve the growing number of young adults in Orange County experiencing homelessness.

Here is what’s next: On May 2, 2019 we celebrated our ground-breaking ceremony for our residential program at Samueli Academy. This will offer a 5/2 model, so that youth can live on campus Monday through Friday and return home (with foster parents or a kindship family) every weekend. Another exciting development is that Samueli Academy will add grades seven and eight in 2020. This will allow many students to change the trajectory of their lives at an even earlier age; it is our goal to capture their interest and enthusiasm even before high school!

Financials

Orangewood Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Orangewood Foundation

Board of directors
as of 1/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Greg Dunlap

Deloitte Tax, LLP

Term: 2016 - 2019

Cindy Dillion

ProblemResolved.org

Steve Keefer

Business Executive

Marissa Barth

Fidelity National Title Company

Bob Bartholomew

Windjammer Capital Investors

Stuart Bernstein

Union Bank

Alan Clifton

Passco Companies, LLC

Keith Duggan

First National Capital Corporation

David Dunn

Athletes First

Richard Dutch

3M Health Care

Lupe Erwin

Wood Gutmann & Bogart Insurance

Bruce Fetter

Business Executive

Joel Goldhirsh

Goldhirsh & Goldhirsh

Adam S. Horowitz

Horowitz Group

Daniel M. Houck II

Universal Asphalt Co., Inc.

Bob Istwan

Motive Energy, Inc.

Sandi Jackson

Community Philanthropist

Steve Johnson

Safety Supply America, Inc.

Chris Jones

Acra Aerospace Inc.

Mitch Junkins

The CDM Company

Harry Langenberg

Optima Tax Relief

Renee Pepys Lowe

RPL and Associates, LLC

Joe Lozowski

Tangram Interiors

Neena N. Master

SoCalGas

Vic Merjanian

Titan HST and Kalfayan Merjanian, LLP

Mohit Mittal

PIMCO

Vikki Murphy

Wilson Automotive Group

Ken Parker

Haynes and Boone, LLP

Lauren Peterson

Whittier Trust

Andy Phillips

Cliq

Jeff Roos

Lennar

Timothy Ryan

Anaheim Arena Management and Anaheim Ducks

Susan Samueli

Samueli Foundation

Sona Shah

My Private Professor Tutoring

Rick Sherburne

CBRE

John E. Stratman

Kaiser Permanente - Orange County

John Stumpf

Core Logic

Kasey Suryan

Pacific Drive-Inc and Lyon Living

Shannon Tarnutzer

Community Philanthropist

Kris Theiler

Disneyland Park

Paul Tobin

Consultant & Attorney

Jaynine Warner

Former Airline Captain

Piero Wemyss

Business Executive

Kimberly Kirksey

44 Women for Orangewood Chair

Adam Koyanagi

Orangewood PALS Chair

Daniel Houck

University Asphalt Company

Bob Istwan

Motive Energy

Mohit Mittal

PIMCO

Andrew Phillips

Cliq

John Stumpf

Quality Systems, Inc.

Kris Theiler

Disney California Adventure Park

Paul Tobin

Consultant & Attorney

Adam Horowitz

Horowitz Group

Daniel Houck

Universal Asphalt Co., Inc.

Adam Horowitz

Horowitz Group

Daniel Houck

Universal Asphalt Co., Inc.

Adam Horowitz

Horowitz Group

Daniel Houck

Universal Asphalt Co., Inc.

Daniel Houck

Universal Asphalt Co., Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable