PLATINUM2024

Orangewood Foundation

Innovator of Youth Services since 1981

Santa Ana, CA   |  https://orangewoodfoundation.org/

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Mission

To strive for equity for our youth by valuing and supporting the life they envision.

Ruling year info

1981

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Chris Simonsen

Main address

1575 E 17th Street

Santa Ana, CA 92705 USA

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Formerly known as

Orangewood Children's Foundation

EIN

95-3616628

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The mission of Orangewood Foundation is to strive for equity for our youth by valuing and supporting the life that they envision. Many transitional-aged youth (TAY) ages 18-24 seek Orangewood’s services to heal and recover from early life traumas, such as food and housing insecurity, sex trafficking, mental illness, substance abuse, poverty, legal system involvement, or placement in the foster care system. These early life traumas often disproportionately impact historically under-resourced and under-served communities across Orange County, weighing heavily on low-income communities and communities of color. Of the 2,000 youth served each year, approximately 75% are youth of color. Orangewood offers services to youth throughout Orange County, including specialized services for survivors of sex trafficking, parenting youth, and youth currently or formerly in foster care.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Connected Program

The Youth Connected Program (YCP) is a licensed, Resource (Foster) Family Agency offering youth in foster care our 5:2 model: weekday dorm living and schooling at the prestigious Samueli Academy with placement in a local Resource Family home on weekends, school breaks, and holidays. Youth attend Samueli Academy, a tuition-free public charter school serving grades 7-12 founded by members of the Orangewood Foundation Board, with a mission to ignite the passion within all students to reach their greatest potential through a nurturing and innovative learning environment. YCP staff offer wraparound services to ensure our students and resource homes get consistent care, attention, and tools for success. The Youth Connected Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), and we are currently seeking Resource Families.

Population(s) Served
Foster and adoptive children
Foster and adoptive parents
At-risk youth

Orangewood Foundation has two community-based drop-in centers in Santa Ana to help youth meet their basic needs, connect to programs and community resources, and participate in case management. The Orangewood Resource Center offers hot meals served daily from our commercial-grade kitchen and groceries in our food pantries. Youth access computers, employment leads, information on housing resources, hygiene items, and clothing. Youth Support Specialists offer referrals to health and mental health care, mobile medical clinics, and on-site group counseling.

Project CHOICE is a drop-in center for youth ages 11-21 who are in or at risk of trafficking. Our team employs a survivor-centered and strengths-based approach, prioritizing the health, safety, and stability of each youth. Project CHOICE helps youth meet their basic needs and engage in case management, survivor leadership, peer mentoring, and individual therapy, as well as resources and education for parenting youth and their children.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Children and youth
Young adults
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Orangewood Foundation offers a range of housing services for youth facing housing insecurity or homelessness. Our transitional housing programs provide two years of specialized services and case management to address the unique needs of our youth. Our Rising Tide community apartments provide affordable and supportive transitional housing for young adults developing skills that are necessary to live independently. The Lighthouse is a trauma-informed program for survivors of trafficking. Casa de Rosemary is a transitional home for young mothers and their child offering workshops on parenting education, workforce development, and healthy relationships, alongside 24-hour on-site supportive services.

Orangewood offers housing assistance across Orange Countys Continuum of Care, including housing vouchers, housing referrals and navigation services, emergency or shelter aid, and assistance with move-in deposits and expenses, to support youth as they transition from foster care to adulthood.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Orangewood partners with the Orange County Social Services Agency to offer the Independent Living Program (ILP) to youth in foster care ages 16-21. ILP provides workshops and one-on-one guidance and support services through case management to help youth prepare for independence. Our goal is to help youth learn, experience, and cultivate the independent living skills necessary for a successful transition into adulthood and make connections to their communities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Young adults
Foster and adoptive children
At-risk youth

Dependent and Independent Grants offer supplemental funds for school activities, IDs or passports, groceries and household items, work needs, and unexpected costs. Additional funds are available to help youth pay for driver’s education.

Undergraduate Scholarships offer financial assistance and staff support for youth in community college, 4-year university, or an approved trade school. Scholarship funds cover tuition, books, course materials, and living expenses, and youth can access staff for referrals and linkages to other Orangewood and community services. Our goal is for student scholarship recipients to focus on school, achieve their educational goals, and move toward their career.

The Advanced Studies Fund (ASF) is for youth pursuing an advanced degree (masters, doctorate, or specialized training). Scholars can seek resource support, mentorship, and networking connections among staff, alumni, and donors.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Foster and adoptive children
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Students

The General William Lyon Workforce Academy is an individualized, employee-centered, and trauma-informed work apprenticeship program that helps youth secure full-time employment and earn a living wage in an industry trade. The Lyon Workforce Academy places youth in apprenticeships at partnering companies in Orange County where they undergo a skill-based training program relevant to sustainable career paths that contribute meaningfully to our community. Youth participate in workshops on career exploration, job search skills, work readiness, financial literacy, self-care and mental health, and the development of soft skills, such as communication and conflict resolution. Partnering companies that hire our youth receive, at no cost, trauma-informed training to assist staff at their company in supporting our youth. Upon graduating, youth have an employable trade or skill that secures them full-time work in career leading to long-term success.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

The Young Adult Court (YAC) of Orange County offers young men ages 18-25 charged with nonviolent felony offenses in Orange County the opportunity to remove felony charges from their records after graduating from the program and successfully reconnecting with their communities. Orangewood provides YAC participants with intensive case management services involving frequent one-on-one contact with each client to explore his obstacles, goals, and needs. Successful participants complete the program over an 18- to 24- month period and upon graduation, qualify to have their felony charges removed or reduced, clearing future pathways otherwise barred due to bearing a record with felony convictions. Young Adult Court is a community-driven, researcher-practitioner partnership among the Orange County Superior Court, District Attorney, Public Defender, Office of Probation, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and Orangewood Foundation.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
At-risk youth
Offenders
Young men

Samueli Academy, home of the Firewolves, opened in 2013 under the leadership of Orangewood Foundation. The school was created after the Orangewood Board of Directors witnessed the low high school graduation rates among Orange County’s historically underserved and under-resourced youth, especially youth in foster care. Nationally, only 54% of foster youth graduate from high school. Samueli Academy serves students in grades 7-12 through an intentional curriculum and accompanying wrap-around support services, which include: (1) a STEAM-focused curriculum rich in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art/Design, and Mathematics; (2) a Work Based Learning Program for career success with access to internships and professional mentors; (3) a vibrant Project Based Learning model to engage students in learning across classrooms and subjects; and (4) an array of academic and social-emotional wraparound student support services, including college preparation, work readiness, and scholarship support.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Foster and adoptive children
At-risk youth
Students

Where we work

Accreditations

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) 2022

Awards

2023 California Nonprofit of the Year, District 34 2023

California State Senator Tom Umberg

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of foster youth with housing arrangements

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Young adults

Related Program

Housing Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Orangewood provides transitional housing to transitional age youth throughout Orange County through four housing sites.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Young adults, Foster and adoptive children, At-risk youth

Related Program

Independent Living

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Orangewood holds life skills workshops in the areas of relationships and daily living, education, employment, and more. These workshops are for youth in foster care and extended foster care.

Number of college scholarships provided to youth

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Students

Related Program

Grants and Scholarships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Scholarships offer financial assistance and staff support for youth pursuing higher education or vocational training so that they can focus on school rather than on financial emergencies.

Number of advanced studies scholarships provided to former foster youth

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Economically disadvantaged people, At-risk youth, Students

Related Program

Grants and Scholarships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Advanced Studies Fund (ASF) is for youth pursuing an advanced degree (masters, doctorate, or specialized training). Scholars can seek resource support, mentorship, and networking connections.

Bags of groceries provided to youth

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Community Drop-In Centers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Orangewood's on-site resource center helps youth with basic needs such as groceries, toiletries, hot meals and laundry facilities.

Hot meals served to former foster youth

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Community Drop-In Centers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Orangewood's on-site resource center helps youth with basic needs such as groceries, toiletries, hot meals and laundry facilities.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Orangewood Foundation was established in 1981 as the first public-private partnership of its kind to build a shelter for abused and neglected children in Orange County. The Orangewood Children & Family Center opened its doors in 1985, which the Foundation deeded to the county to own and operate. Orangewood next focused the Foundation’s attention on supporting youth in foster care between ages 18-24 in their transition out of the foster care system and into adulthood through innovative programming across four service areas: health and wellness, housing, life skills and employment, and education.

Orangewood’s youth support specialists, case managers, and youth advocates worked for decades with transitional age foster youth throughout Orange County. As we worked with our foster youth, our organization partnered with community-based providers that worked with youth in the same age group as our own and who faced similar challenges. In remaining flexible, collaborative, and attuned to the needs of our community’s youth, Orangewood Foundation assessed for greatest needs and expanded its reach to become a leading provider, partner, and advocate for transitional-aged youth (TAY) in Orange County. All transitional-aged youth residing in Orange County between ages 18-24 are eligible for our services as we continually seek to reduce the barriers that youth face in meeting their needs, overcoming trauma, and building a life of stability and self-sufficiency.

Today Orangewood Foundation is a private nonprofit organization located in Santa Ana, CA, that works each year with roughly 2,000 transitional-aged youth (TAY) between ages 18-24 across Orange County. We offer trauma-informed, strengths-based programming and direct services, which includes case management, community referrals, mental healthcare, life skills and education, and resources for basic needs and stable housing. As a networked nonprofit, community leader, and a leading provider for youth, Orangewood Foundation advocates for our youth and connects them with partners, providers, and resources across Orange County. The Orangewood resource network consists of individuals, corporations, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations across our community that work together to build innovative resources, programs, and direct services that keep up with the changing needs, challenges, and strengths of the youth who seek our support. Our goal in working with youth is that they have the skills, community connections, education, and resources needed to thrive as healthy and independent adults and community leaders. We envision a community where every youth thrives, and we are guided by respect, trust, empathy, inclusion, and advocacy.

Orangewood Foundation offers innovative resources, support services, and programs across four service areas that align with evidence-based best practices in youth support services: (1) health and wellness, (2) housing, (3) life skills and employment, and (4) education. We use a low-barrier case management, care coordination model to connect youth with wrap-around services both within Orangewood and in the Orange County community through referrals to an expansive network of community partnerships, including local government agencies, other nonprofit service providers, and corporate partners. This model allows Orangewood to serve as a one-stop resource for transitional-age youth seeking to coordinate their care and service access. Case managers across Orangewood’s programs employ a trauma-informed approach to service delivery and use a variety of strategies, such as harm reduction, motivational interviewing, and strengths-based, client centered support.

Each youth who seeks Orangewood services comes with different experiences, needs, and goals. Our Youth Support Specialists meet youth where they are in their journeys by building trust-based relationships, assessing needs, and supporting youth in finding stability and achieving their goals. As a youth’s needs change, Youth Support Specialists guide them through Orangewood’s services and connect them to community resources as they work toward longer-term success.

Orangewood Foundation has a 40-year history of successful innovation in youth services, designing programs to meet our youth’s ever-changing needs. Orangewood is a private nonprofit organization located in Santa Ana, CA, and one of the leading service providers for transitional-aged youth (TAY) in Orange County. As a networked nonprofit, we partner with foundations, corporations, individuals, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations across our community to build a network of innovative resources, programs, and direct services.

Orangewood Foundation’s programs and services are data-driven and outcome-oriented. We track our progress, measures success rates, and employs best practices in youth services through case management, evidence-based assessments, and data management. Our programs succeed only when youth succeed. By tracking and measuring individual rates of stability and success among youth, this data enables Orangewood to measure overall program outcomes and identify areas for improved services and needed innovation.

Orangewood Foundation is committed to financial transparency and stability so that we can make a deep and sustained impact on Orange County’s transitional-aged youth (TAY). Orangewood adopts innovated solutions to diversify revenue streams and secure long-term funding. Orangewood Foundation has remained financially solvent since its founding in 1981 through committed community partnerships and increasingly diversified revenue streams and investment strategies. Orangewood is led by a strong Board of Directors made up of community leaders. Our Board actively supports the youth, missions, and programs of Orangewood Foundation through fundraising, strategic input and guidance, and partnerships with Orangewood’s leadership team on key initiatives. The Board relies on program outcomes and data provided by program directors, as well as feedback from the youth we serve, to lead our strategic planning.

Innovation is our foundation at Orangewood. Since 1981, Orangewood Foundation has created strong partnerships to meet our youth and our community’s needs. We have a 40-year history of successful and innovative programming that supports our youth’s changing needs:

In 1981, Orangewood Foundation worked with the County of Orange to launch the first public-private partnership of its kind to build the Orangewood Children & Family Center, which it deeded to the County in 1985 to own and operate.

In 1998, Orangewood collaborated with California State University, Fullerton (CSUF) to innovate the first Guardian Scholars’ program in the nation.

In 1998, Orangewood partnered with a group of businessmen to open the Rising Tide transitional housing program with low-cost rent and wraparound supportive services.

In 2009, Orangewood established the Advanced Studies Fund to provide scholarships for former foster youth seeking graduate degrees.

In 2013, the Orangewood Board of Directors created the Samueli Academy, a public charter school designed to boost graduation rates for youth in foster care and youth from under-resourced communities.

In 2015, Orangewood opened The Lighthouse to provide safe, secure, and supportive transitional housing and trauma-informed wraparound supportive services to survivors of trafficking. Orangewood also partnered with the County of Orange to provide specialized support and preventative services to youth involved in or at-risk of sex trafficking, creating Project CHOICE.

In 2018, researchers at UC Irvine, the OC Superior Court, and Orangewood Foundation partnered to create Young Adult Court, which offers youth ages 18-25 charged with a non-violent felony the opportunity to expunge their felony from their record through a two-year case management program.

In 2021, Orangewood opened the Youth Connected Program on the Samueli Academy campus, a licensed and accredited Resource Family Agency providing onsite housing for foster youth.

In 2022, Orangewood Foundation partnered with local companies to create the Lyon Workforce Academy, a 12-month trauma-informed work apprenticeship program that places youth in local companies to earn living wages and break the cycle of generational poverty.

In fall 2020, Orangewood adopted a new strategic plan with five key initiatives: to (1) become an outcomes-based organization, (2) invigorate positioning and messaging, (3) become a trauma informed organization, (4) embrace diversity and inclusion, and (5) create an employee empowered culture. Orangewood’s long-term goal is to deepen the impact that our program and service outcomes have on the youth experience in Orange County.

Orangewood is committed to cultivating a staff that reflects the diversity of identity and experience of the youth we serve. We embrace diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging in all our programs and practices. Working to promote diversity and equity is continuous and shapes our partnerships and programs.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Orangewood Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Orangewood Foundation

Board of directors
as of 03/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Paul Tobin

Haynes & Boone, LLP

Term: 2016 - 2026


Board co-chair

Jo-E Lopez

Snyder Langston

Term: 2023 - 2026

Marissa Barth

Fidelity National Title Company

Alan Clifton

Passco Companies, LLC

Keith Duggan

First National Capital Corporation

David Dunn

Athletes First

Adam S. Horowitz

Horowitz Group

Daniel M. Houck II

Universal Asphalt Co., Inc.

Bob Istwan

Motive Energy, Inc.

Sandi Jackson

Community Philanthropist

Mitch Junkins

The CDM Company

Harry Langenberg

Optima Tax Relief

Renee Pepys Lowe

RPL and Associates, LLC

Joe Lozowski

Tangram Interiors

Neena N. Master

SoCalGas

Vic Merjanian

Titan HST and Kalfayan Merjanian, LLP

Mohit Mittal

PIMCO

Vikki Murphy

Wilson Automotive Group

Lauren Peterson

Whittier Trust

Andy Phillips

Cliq

Jeff Roos

Lennar

Timothy Ryan

Anaheim Arena Management and Anaheim Ducks

Susan Samueli

Samueli Foundation

Sona Shah

My Private Professor Tutoring

Rick Sherburne

CBRE

John Stumpf

Core Logic

Kasey Suryan

Pacific Drive-Inc and Lyon Living

Kris Theiler

Disneyland Park

Paul Tobin

Consultant & Attorney

Piero Wemyss

Business Executive

Kimberly Kirksey

Kirksey & Co

Dennis Berlien

Glumac

Jo-E Lopez

Snyder Langston

Mark Powell

Wealth Strategist

Cassandra Williams

Atech Consulting

Brandon Fetta

Capital Group

Jamie Hong

Fidelity National Title Insurance Co.

Maegan Lujan

Toshiba America Business Solutions

Barry McManus

Klein Products

Emily Jameson

Bank of America

Tedd Barr

Converze

Leila Entezam

Lezam

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/18/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/05/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.