GOLD2023

WEST SIDE FOOD BANK A NON-PROFIT CORPORATION

Together, Let's End Hunger on the Westside

aka Westside Food Bank   |   Santa Monica, CA   |  www.wsfb.org

Mission

Westside Food Bank's mission is to end hunger in our communities by providing access to free nutritious food through food acquisition and distribution, and by engaging the community and advocating for a strong food assistance network.

Notes from the nonprofit

Westside Food Bank is grateful to its thousands of supporters including financial contributors, volunteers, advocates, partner agencies, and the general public. We could not do this work without generous community support. Thank you.

Ruling year info

1983

President/CEO

Ms. Genevieve Riutort

Main address

1710 22nd Street

Santa Monica, CA 90404 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-3685875

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The need for food assistance in our service was already at a record-high level before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, the face of hunger is changing as a result of this unprecedented societal shutdown. People facing layoffs, furloughs and reduced hours must now seek food assistance to make ends meet, often for the first time. We are now meeting the food security needs of tens of thousands of additional households including families with children, homebound seniors, people working in the entertainment industry, gig workers, restaurant workers, college students, veterans, and more. Our member agencies that provide food and services to people experiencing homelessness are also seeing an increase in the number of people seeking help. In a typical year, our food reaches 108,000 people, but we expect to serve 200,000 or more in 2020 as a result of COVID-19. We are distributing 75% more food than usual and our member agencies continue to request even more.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Nutritious Food Distribution

Westside Food Bank acquires food through donations, purchases, and our Extra Helpings Westside(EHW)program. We distribute the food to local low-income people via the services of our 70 member agencies, mainly through food pantries that distribute extra groceries to individuals and families in need. Our food reaches more than 108,000 local people each year, nearly half of whom are children.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

WSFB acquires food through donations and purchases. Regular wholesale purchases allow us to round out the nutritional value of the food we distribute and ensure a steady supply of nutritious foods to member agencies. About 90% of our food is distributed to individuals and families via food pantries that provide free groceries. The rest is provided at shelters, transitional living sites, community kitchens and afterschool and preschool programs. Almost half of our food is distributed to children.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

California Nonprofit of the Year 2017

Senator Ben Allen

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Pounds of fresh produce distributed per year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Nutritious Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These figures represent fresh produce distributed from Westside Food Bank's warehouse and includes both purchased and donated produce for the various Fiscal Years. (2021 indicates FY20-21)

Estimated dollar value of food donations distributed to community feedings programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Nutritious Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This figure is based on Feeding America's industry standard wholesale valuation of $1.67 per pound. The amount saved by families who receive our food is greater given the high retail cost for food.

Total dollar value of produce distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Nutritious Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

For families struggling to make ends meet the dollar value saved is actually much higher.

Number of food donation partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Nutritious Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The California Association of Food Banks' Farm to Family Produce Project is a key source as are community food drives. In 2020 we've had to limit food drives due to COVID-19 concerns and distancing.

Pounds of Food Distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Nutritious Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These figures represent the total number of pounds of food distributed by Westside Food Bank which includes both purchased and donated food.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is to end hunger in our communities by providing access to free nutritious food through food acquisition and distribution, and by engaging the community and advocating for a strong food assistance network.

In the face of this sustained high need, we endeavor to provide the vulnerable populations our member agencies serve with as much fresh produce as possible, as well as with key staple items like eggs, rice, beans, and frozen chicken. We make acquiring fresh produce a priority because so much of our food goes to vulnerable populations who depend on our supply of fruits and vegetables for nearly all of the fresh produce in their diets.

Each person, and especially child, who consistently receives adequate amounts of our fresh produce, high-protein staples and low-fat items has the chance to be a better student or more self-sustaining member of society, as well as more confident and secure, with a stronger immune system and a reduced chance of developing diabetes, obesity, and other serious diet-related health problems.

Our member agencies know that they can rely on a consistent supply of nourishing staples for their clients every time they pick up food in our warehouse, including multiple types of fresh fruits and vegetables. We charge our member agencies what amounts to less than two cents per pound for the food they receive – far less than the food bank industry standard of 19-20 cents per pound, so that they can devote more time and resources to helping their clients achieve greater wellness and independence. We are active with the California Association of Food Banks (CAFB) and with the Westside Coalition to address the multiple factors affecting hunger and poverty and we work with the LA County Department of Public Social Services to facilitate CalFresh registration at our member food pantry sites.

WSFB is the primary food bank provider for virtually all the non-profit social service agencies with food assistance programs in Santa Monica, Venice, Culver City, West Los Angeles, West Hollywood, Inglewood and the LAX area. Our balanced variety of food reaches anyone in our service area who is in need of food assistance including low-income families with children; unemployed, under-employed and working poor people; seniors on fixed incomes and the frail elderly; women and children living in domestic violence shelters; homeless individuals; mentally ill, chronically ill and disabled individuals and food-insecure college students and veterans. Our food reaches approximately 108,000 unduplicated people annually, nearly half of whom are children.

Our member agencies come to our warehouse to pick up weekly food allotments, and/or receive food delivered from our Extra Helpings Westside prepared and perishable food rescue program. We currently supply more than 70 agencies with a balanced variety of nutritious foods. More than 90% of our food is distributed to individuals and families via food pantries that provide grocery bags. The rest is provided at shelters, transitional living sites, afterschool and preschool programs, community kitchens and most recently at direct distributions at VA sites and at local elementary schools and colleges.

Over the past two years, WSFB has engaged in limited direct service programs. We operate a weekly produce distribution for 150 veterans at the West LA VA hospital and provide bagged lunches for veterans at several local VA sites. We are also working with the Culver City Unified School District to provide a free farmers’ market-style distribution of fresh produce and high protein foods for high-need families that allows parents at several schools in the district to “shop” for food after dropping off their children, eliminating the need to visit a separate food pantry site. From June - August 2019 we ran the fourth year of our summer food bags for children program at several of our member food pantries. The program bolsters food security for children in the absence of school meals and eases the increased financial burden placed on parents during summer months. We provided supplemental food for over 6,000 children through the summer food bags program this year.

We are also providing high-protein items, pantry staples and fresh produce to food pantry and/or farmers’ market-style distributions at UCLA, Santa Monica College, West LA College, and Mount Saint Mary’s University to address the high rate of food insecurity among college students. We are exploring the possibility of working with other local colleges with large populations of food-insecure students to create distribution programs.

Westside Food Bank has been serving the community for nearly 40 years with a strong record of efficiency and providing valuable service for the donated dollar. Given the strong commitment and significant experience of our Board and staff, as well as our solid relationships with funders, community coalitions and other stakeholders, we are confident that Westside Food Bank is well-positioned to address the food security and nutrition needs of our community now and for years to come.

WSFB’s food assistance work last year provided more than 53,000 children and 55,000 adults in our service area with access to a steady supply of a wide range of nourishing foods. We are able to maximize donations of produce by participating in the California Association of Food Banks (CAFB) “Farm to Family” produce project, through which we share truckloads of produce from farms with other Food Banks throughout California at minimal cost. We also receive fresh produce through our prepared and perishable food rescue program Extra Helpings Westside. In acquiring and distributing food we adhere to the guidelines detailed in our official Nutrition Policy and for the past three years, more than half of the food distributed from our warehouse was fresh produce.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

WEST SIDE FOOD BANK A NON-PROFIT CORPORATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

WEST SIDE FOOD BANK A NON-PROFIT CORPORATION

Board of directors
as of 05/08/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Shivaun Cooney

Susan Choo

JP Morgan Chase

David Wisen

Pacific Western Bank

Shivaun Cooney

Latham & Watkins LLP

Gary Bachrach

Gary Bachrach, CPA

Steven Bauer

Pepperdine University

Barry Glaser

Morgan Stanley

Rebecca Mais

Wedbush Securities

Alex Milley

TraPac LLC

Carolina Morera

1st Century Bank

Eric Peltz

RAND Corporation

Roger Riske

Educational Trust

Bruce Rosen

Redwood Financial

Spencer Smith

Union Bank

Rosie Strickland

St. Matthews Parish School

Daniel Weinrot

Leaf Group

Barbara Whittenburg

CASA

Russell Whittenburg

Forest Lawn Mortuaries

Cathryn Dhanatya

Growing Good Inc

Charlene Kim

Capital Research & Management Company Counsel

Chidera Izuchukwu

Crete Academy

Roger Lustberg

Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP - retired

Dr. Scherise Mitchell-Jordan

Researcher in Cardiovascular Physiology

Maggie Nemser

CEO BlackboardEats.com

Jeffrey Westheimer

Lido Advisors, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/1/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/18/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.