Center for Conflict Resolution

Bringing Peace, Creating Peacemakers

aka CCR   |   Reseda, CA   |  www.ccr4peace.org

Mission

The Center for Conflict Resolution believes in principles on how people are to live and work together. These principles, such as honesty, respect, humility, responsibility to community, justice, mercy, forgiveness and trust, are the foundation of all that CCR offers. These principles are essential in finding positive resolutions and learning constructive conflict resolution skills. CCR's goal is to empower communities, organizations and individuals to handle disputes constructively by developing and designing appropriate and creative solutions that address everyone's interests, needs, values, and motivators. It also includes designing internal conflict management systems, mediation training, and education in conflict resolution.

Ruling year info

1983

Executive Director

Mr. Christopher Welch

Main address

7806 Reseda Blvd

Reseda, CA 91335 USA

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Formerly known as

Christian Conciliation Services

EIN

95-3872454

NTEE code info

Dispute Resolution/Mediation Services (I51)

Christian (X20)

Dispute Resolution/Mediation Services (I51)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

At the beginning of 2020, our world began its "Great Digital Transformation". It manifested itself in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, but it created rippling effects throughout the industries and social structures in our society. The industry of Conflict Resolution was critically impacted and the event advanced the profession to accept the new standards and methods of 'virtual' communication. Our organization was impacted greatly by this transition. In our new world, CCR wants to equip the systems of the future with the valuable extremely valuable service of peacemaking, facilitation, and mediation. Making sure that justice partners are including us in their roadmap. Creating the boundaries and space needed to ensure that the 'magic' of the mediator can continue well into the future. Our world needs reconciliation. It needs Peacemakers and CCR wants to be one of those organizations that guide us all into our next chapter.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Court Day-of-Hearing Mediation Program

The Los Angeles Superior Court Day-of-Hearing mediation program provides daily mediation services to 12 different courthouses throughout Los Angeles County. Collectively 2,900 cases and 8,000 people are served in this capacity every year. The County of Los Angeles Workforce Development and Aging Service provides us with a grant to provide this service. Over 125 volunteers and University students assist to reach our goals.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of mediations performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Court Day-of-Hearing Mediation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CCR performs mediation services at 12 Courthouses throughout Los Angeles County. (e.g.-Fiscal Year 19-20 is 2019) Stopped providing services in the Courthouses March 2020 because of COVID19.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Court Day-of-Hearing Mediation Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Volunteer hours represent the amount of volunteer mediation hours provided to the organization by individuals - *2019 = FY2019-2020 March 2020 stopped services because of Court Closure

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CCR wants to mediate over 3,000 cases per year and involve over 10,000 individual participants in our mediation services. CCR wants to be one of the largest providers of mediation services in the United States for cases of limited value (Under $10,000). CCR wants to mediate cases for the most diverse population in the world. CCR wants to maintain an extremely qualified and diverse composition of mediators that is reflective of the community. CCR wants to be known as the organization that can handle to difficult case in the community, through mediation or group facilitation. CCR wants to raise enough money to have a strong capital reserve that acts as the foundation of our continued success and is a buffer in our time of need. CCR would like to be able to compensate more mediators for the amazing work they provide. CCR wants to maximize efforts to spread the good word of mediation and get the larger community to buy in to the idea that mediation is a great alternative to the Court process. We want to help to bring peace to a divided and fractured society.

CCR will maintain its strong relationship with our primary funder, the County of Los Angeles. Since the early '90s the County has funded our organization with funds from the Dispute Resolution Program Act. This consistent funding has allowed us access to the Los Angeles Superior Court. Every day we send mediators to 12 different courthouses throughout Los Angeles County to provide day of hearing mediation services. 95% of these individuals are volunteers or clinic students from law schools or graduate schools with an emphasis in Dispute Resolution. Los Angeles is one of the most culturally diverse cities and counties in the world. Being connected with Universities who recruit from around the world helps to have a consistent pool of diversity among our mediators as well. Our foundation will be built one brick at a time. Reaching out to those that believe in the organization, believes in the idea that peace is a process built through understanding and relationships. We will continue to reach towards a peaceful resolution of conflict.

The development of online systems that are easy to use for the parties and mediators.
Creating an interface for our mediators that makes it easy and effective to volunteer.
Reaching out to communites beyond just the court in areas of facilitation, mediation, conciliation in various areas of the community.

We currently have a consistent budget that can support 3 full time employees and one part-time employee. The rest of the organization is currently built on volunteers giving their precious time. Driving in Los Angeles traffic, arriving at courts, and dealing with everyone's dispute in a respectful and professional manner. We have the best staff available. They work extremely hard to handle the recruiting, scheduling, oversight, reporting requirements, and so so so much more. But financial resources would and are always needed. More than just what the grant provides. If some of our mediators could be paid Court Liaison's on a consistent basis, the locations would be better served. As three employees we can only be in 1 place at a time. We have such amazing volunteers and University partners. They provide us will the capacity and we wish we could do so much more for all of them and for the community. And of course we have restrictions in our grant that require a fairly substantial reserve.

Now we have an online dispute resolution solution along with Zoom that can connect our mediators with the clients where they are. It will help to eliminate some of the previous stresses of Los Angeles life with the ability to resolve things from the comfort of your home. But also we are increasing our panel of qualified mediators to be able to handle cases even outside the County of Los Angeles. Extending our reach to other areas that might need our services.

CCR has mediated 28,000 cases since 2000. Last year CCR mediate 2400 cases and served over 6,000 individuals. The demographics of the individuals we served were ethnically, economically and culturally diverse. We are so proud of that ability to serve so many people. Financially, we still have the grant, but we need to raise money. We need a financial buffer for when payments from the County are not made and when payroll needs to be made. All non-profits understand this and over time CCR has been sustained without having to ask for many financial donations. Now the time has come and every dollar will help to sustain our organization and move our community in a more peaceful direction. One dispute at a time individuals can be introduced to an alternative that can have a significant impact on the whole.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The question was how will CCR continue to operate now that their primary model of service has completely stopped due to COVID-19? Well we adapted by building our infrastructure and creating a new business model of virtual services that will help us continue into the future.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners, Los Angeles County,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Center for Conflict Resolution
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Center for Conflict Resolution

Board of directors
as of 2/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Stephanie Blondell

Pepperdine University

Term: 2018 -

Karinya Verghese

FINRA

Stephanie Blondell

Straus Institute for Dispute Resolution Pepperdine University

Sarah Park

Pepperdine University School of Law

Hilary Bendon

HXB, LLC

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/11/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/11/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.