Chrysalis

Changing Lives Through Jobs

aka The Chrysalis Center   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  ChangeLives.org

Mission

Chrysalis is a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating a pathway to self-sufficiency for homeless and low-income individuals by providing the resources and support needed to find and retain employment.

Ruling year info

1985

Principal Officer

Mark Loranger

Main address

522 S Main St

Los Angeles, CA 90013 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-3972624

NTEE code info

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

At Chrysalis, we have always believed that our central focus on employment addresses an unmet need among an underserved population. Our approach to homelessness focuses on building, highlighting, and fortifying individuals' skill sets and marketability in the workforce. Today, we can confidently say that this approach is not a theoretical response to homelessness and poverty, but rather a proven formula for success, yielding results that have increased year after year.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Chrysalis Employment Program

At the core of Chrysalis’ program are our job-readiness classes and services. Our core curriculum – developed over 30 years of serving this population – is designed to improve job search skills, self-confidence, and employability. Workshops and resources include:

• A series of job-readiness classes covering how to prepare for a job search, components of a job application, soft skills and interview preparation, and how to achieve workplace success and retain employment
• A workbook containing exercises and a job search toolkit

In tandem with these classes, our dedicated volunteers provide one-on-one resume writing services, conduct practice interviews, and assist clients with online job applications. At the same time, Employment Specialists support clients throughout their self-directed job search by providing individualized guidance, counseling clients in goal setting, and providing referrals to a range of other services, including child care, housing, healthcare, legal services, and mental health support.

Job seekers participating in our program have access to additional resources including:

• Phones and computers to communicate with potential employers
• A message center to receive phone messages and mail
• Computers and internet access to conduct online job searches, prepare resumes, and update cover letters
• Resource room access for the selection of proper interview and/or work attire
• Hygiene supplies
• Lunches
• Transportation assistance
• Scholarship funds
• Mental health counseling
• Legal aid counseling

Additionally, in order to fully meet the needs of all our clients, Chrysalis partners with over 50 social service and health agencies in Los Angeles and Orange Counties.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Established in 1991, Chrysalis Enterprises provides a transitional jobs program for clients who have the greatest barriers to employment. Chrysalis was one of the first and leading nonprofits to add this component to our services in order to advance our mission of reconnecting individuals to the workforce.

Four divisions of our social enterprise - Chrysalis Staffing, Chrysalis Works, Chrysalis Safekeeping, and Chrysalis Roads, give clients the opportunity to earn a paycheck and develop soft skills while searching for an outside job with ongoing support from their Employment Specialist.
ChangeLives.org/Hire

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Incarcerated people

Where we work

Awards

Top Social Service Agency in dowtown Los Angeles in the past 25 years 2005

Rose Award

Selects Chrysalis Enterprises temporary staffing agency as a national model of successful solutions for fighting poverty 2004

Charles Stewart Mott Foundation

Named Chrysalis Butterfly Ball as one of the top charity events 2008

AOL Money & Finance, BizBash, Conde Nast Portfolio and the Street.com

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of those who successfully gained employment after counseling

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Chrysalis Employment Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our 2020 jobs number is reflective of the COVID-19 pandemic employment landscape.

Number of clients who work a transitional job with one of Chrysalis' social enterprises

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Chrysalis Enterprises

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of clients still working for 6 months or longer

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Chrysalis Employment Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of core curriculum instruction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Chrysalis Employment Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our 2020 amount of hours of core curriculum was greatly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Number of resumes written

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Chrysalis Employment Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of practice interviews conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total wages earned by clients working a transitional job with one of our social enterprises

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Chrysalis Enterprises

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

• Assist at least 1,900 Chrysalis clients in obtaining outside employment at the end of 2021
• More than 65% of all working clients reached will retain employment for six months or longer.
• Provide at least 1,600 individuals with at least 522,000 hours and $5.4 million in wages through Chrysalis Enterprises by the end of 2021.
• Entering into the fifth year of our 5-year strategic plan, we will continue focusing on improving programming and increasing impact through a revision to our core curriculum and the development of a new job-matching system to connect our client resumes to open opportunities.

Components of the Chrysalis' Employment Program include:
• One-on-one mentoring and case management with an Employment Specialist
• Job preparation classes that teach basic job search techniques, career development, and computer skills
• Personalized assistance with resumes, practice interviews, online job applications, and computer and telephone skills
• Support groups
• Group meetings for long-term job retention and career growth
• Intensive computer and customer service training
• Access to computers, telephones, copiers, fax machines, professional clothing, bus tokens and referrals to housing, mental health services, personal hygiene products and other supportive services
• Transitional Employment through Chrysalis Enterprises, where clients can gain on-the-job experience and build their resume

In it's 36 year history, Chrysalis has helped over 66,000 low-income and homeless individuals get on the path to self-sufficiency. One of the key things that makes Chrysalis unique and successful is its continued focus on employment. Chrysalis recognizes that each person who comes to our organization requesting help has a myriad of issues that are standing in the way of their self-sufficiency. But we also know what we do well, which is help people become job-ready, find a job, and retain a job. We've made it part of our service model to assist clients to address all of their barriers to employment by maintaining strong relationships with organizations throughout each community we serve, that can provide a variety of services to help with issues such as substance abuse problems, lack of housing and chronic mental illness. These robust connections help us to facilitate a warm referral of our clients to organizations who are better equipped to address all of their issues. In some cases, where it makes sense, we bring other organizations into our offices to work directly with our clients. For example, Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles sends staff to each of our offices to help clients expunge criminal records, reduce felonies to misdemeanors, and get their drivers' licenses back. We also partner with mental health organizations, who send clinicians to each Chrysalis office to provide short-term therapy for clients with situational mental health issues.

Concentrating its limited resources on the employability of its clients has allowed Chrysalis to quickly innovate and adapt to the changing job market. Recognizing that today, clients need more advanced computer and customer service skills to be competitive in their job search, Chrysalis has developed intensive trainings that augment our core curriculum. We have also updated our program to include topics such as internet safety, online applications, advanced interviewing, and networking.
Moreover, while social enterprise has become a buzzword throughout the nonprofit community recently, since 1991 Chrysalis has been operating a social enterprise that has grown to become a national model. Chrysalis Enterprises (CE) offers clients with the most significant barriers to employment paid, transitional employment with our in-house businesses to get them started on the road to permanent, outside positions.

As we enter the fourth year of our 5-year strategic plan, we will continue focusing on the key areas of: improving programming, increasing impact, and supporting growth.

• Core Curriculum: The Chrysalis core curriculum is integral to client program completion and success in the job search process. With client input and participation, we will be revisiting various aspects of the curriculum, including class length, content covered, and schedule of classes offered. Initial plans are to test pre- and post- learning, as well as to better understand what clients feel is most helpful and a priority to enhance their job search process and overall Chrysalis experience.
• Resume & Job Matching: Key to the job search process is the resume. Our current process frequently requires the manual entry of similar data multiple times, and thus, we will be exploring more efficient and possibly automated methods for developing client resumes. Furthermore, our job matching process relies on staff memory oftentimes rather than mining a database. As part of this work, we will explore methods to make the process faster and more comprehensive, thereby increasing the number of potential job matches in a shorter period of time.
• Professional Development of Direct Services Staff: With a dedicated, eager, and newer staff, there will be an increased focus on awareness and training on service delivery, including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Trauma-Informed Care, and Mental Health First Aid. Furthermore, we will seek additional opportunities for staff to participate in sector-wide convenings to both share and learn best practices.

As Chrysalis' mission is primarily jobs-focused, our main outcomes going forward will also focus on jobs. Last year, over 1,623 individuals were reconnected to the workforce and over 1,666 clients worked a transitional job in one of our three social enterprise business divisions.

Over the next two years, Chrysalis will also increase our outreach activities and grow our already substantial referral networks to increase the number of individuals in our target population (unstably housed, homeless, and/or formerly incarcerated) who can avail themselves of our services. Similarly, we will continue to increase our efforts to partner with employers who are willing to give our target population a chance, as well as work with policymakers to encourage the dedication of resources and legislation to aid the homeless and formerly incarcerated individuals we serve.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our services are free and available to all who are willing and able to work. Our clients are predominantly individuals who are experiencing barriers to the workforce, including economic instability, homelessness or unstable housing, justice system involvement, limited formal work history, and more.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In 2019, our core curriculum was revamped. Over a period of time, clients were surveyed on how Chrysalis' program could best serve their needs, and in response, new job-readiness classes were developed. They were shortened in length but the content was more tailored to the job search needs of our clients, including a renewed focus on helping the reentry population navigate a conviction.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    By asking for feedback from the people we serve, we have been able to provide resources that help us meet our clients where they are at. For example, we realized that a job doesn't always provide instant stability so we utilize funding to provide basic needs such as groceries or rental assistance. We also want those we serve to feel a sense of purpose and fulfillment with the job they secure so we offer scholarship assistance for trainings and certifications in many industries. This has allowed us strengthen the relationships we build with our clients by assuring them that we are here to help every step of the way.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Chrysalis
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Chrysalis

Board of directors
as of 7/8/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Joan Kramer

Mabery Shaw

Term: 2020 -

Jill Baldauf

UCLA Anderson

Hayward Kaiser

Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP

Jeffrey Daly

Goldman Sachs & Co

Marchell Hilliard

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Paul Stapleton

Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors, LP

Mark Loranger

Chrysalis

Timothy Dubois

The Edwards Thomas Companies

Lulu Fou

Accenture

Robert Hart

TruAmerica Multifamily

Rick Hess

Evolution Media Capital

Mary Kanoff

Peninsula Pacific LLC

Joan Kramer

Mabery Shaw

Jonathan Levinson

Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors, LP

Alan Long

Sotheby's International Realty

Caroline MacDonald

Rosewood Hotel Group

Karen Murphy O'Brien

Murphy O'Brien Public Relations

Gary Newman

Fox Television Group

Kerry O'Neill

United States Attorney's Office

Colin Shepherd

Hines

Steven Vielhaber

Howard Zelikow

Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors, LP

Amelia Williamson

AWA Consults

Pawan Chaturvedi

Aqueduct Capital Group, LLC

Patricia Johnson

UBS Private Wealth Management

Jeffery Walker

Southern California Gas Company

Katie Locke-Aviv

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/17/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/01/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.