Los Angeles Conservation Corps

Transforming Youth. Enhancing Communities.

aka LA Conservation Corps, LA Corps, LACC   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  https://www.lacorps.org

Mission

The primary mission of the Los Angeles Conservation Corps is to provide at-risk young adults and school-aged youth with opportunities for success by providing them with job skills training, education and work experience with an emphasis on conservation and service projects that benefit the community.

Ruling year info

1985

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Wendy Butts

Main address

PO Box 861658

Los Angeles, CA 90086-1658 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-4002138

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Environmental Beautification (C50)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As of December 2020, the Los Angeles metro area’s unemployment rate was 10.7%. In the South LA, East LA, South Bay, and eastern San Fernando Valley communities that the Los Angeles Conservation Corps serves, the unemployment rate averages 23.3%. There are approximately 73,000 opportunity youth in Los Angeles County, i.e., 13.7% of all young adults (16-24) are out of work or out of school. Los Angeles Unified School District’s class of 2019 graduation rate was only 78%, and low-income African American and Latino students in disadvantaged communities are overrepresented. Employers have cited the “middle-skills” gap as an obstacle to filling available jobs. Middle-skill jobs require more than a high school education but not a four-year college degree. Job training and placement programs, such as those offered by LA Conservation Corps, provide opportunity youth with career pathways and connect them with jobs that pay family-sustaining wages, contributing to community resilience.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Conservation Programs

Environmental conservation programs serve as job training opportunities for at-risk young adults and school-aged youth. Work projects include habitat restoration, tree planting, park and trail construction, graffiti removal, green space development, resource recycling, energy efficiency, and alternative energy.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Supportive services and transition assistance for at-risk young adults. Services include barrier removal, basic needs assistance, behavioral counseling, life skills training, job placement, college/career guidance, and scholarships.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

The After-School Program provides academic enrichment programs for 16 LAUSD elementary and middle school campuses. This program provides homework assistance and engages youth in structured activity clubs focused on arts, performing arts, digital arts, and computers.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

California Association of Local Conservation Corps 2018

Awards

Project Innovation 2019

NBCUniversal

Affiliations & memberships

The Corps Network 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of free participants on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Conservation Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of students on field trips to SEA Lab in Redondo Beach or participating in water education programs at SEA Lab or at their school location. N.B.: SEA Lab closed June 2019.

Number of contracts/purchase agreements that the organization holds for purchase of its products/services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Conservation Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each year, the Corps takes on approximately 30 new contracts and successfully closes out 20, with nearly 100 contracts active at any given time, totaling approximately $18 million in revenues.

Total cost of work acquired this year (in dollars)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Conservation Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For conservation programs only.

Number of free participants of guided tours

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Conservation Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In CY2018, SEA Lab had 6,713 visitors from the general public coming through its doors to view the aquarium exhibits. N.B.: SEA Lab closed June 2019.

Number of placements defined as full-time

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Corpsmember Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Corpsmembers who exited to jobs and/or post-secondary education.

Number of program graduates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Corpsmember Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

At then end of FY18/19, 75 Corpsmembers exited to jobs or college/vocational school.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Corpsmember Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The workforce development program provided 220,000 hours of paid work experience and on-the-job training to 462 low-income 18- to 25-year-olds (with 250 active at any given time).

Number of hours of training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Corpsmember Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The workforce development program provided 220,000 hours of paid work experience and on-the-job training to 462 low-income 18- to 25-year-olds (with 250 active at any given time).

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our youth/workforce development goals:
* Enable program participants (called Corpsmembers) to earn their high school diploma, if they enter the program without one
* Train Corpsmembers trained for employability in green industries or better preparation for post-secondary education

Our environmental conservation goals:
* Promote sustainable recreation
* Restore the urban tree canopy
* Increase greenspace in greenspace-poor urban areas
* Restore natural habitat in parks and nature preserves in and around Los Angeles County
* Protect the coastal ecosystem
* Promote recycling and reduce consumer waste
* Promote energy efficiency and water conservation

First-phase Corpsmembers alternate between work and school, as well as receiving supportive services and job/life skills training. Second-phase Corpsmembers select a Green Career Pathway—natural land management, zero waste, construction, energy, or manufacturing—and receive specialized job training and industry-recognized certifications. After successful program completion, Corpsmembers will have the qualifications of a competitive entry-level employee in their chose field or be prepared for college or vocational school leading to greater career opportunities.

Corpsmembers receive paid work experience and on-the-job training while performing environmental conservation work projects and service learning projects intended to make Los Angeles a cleaner and greener place:
* Building and maintaining hiking trails and walking paths, which facilitate sustainable recreation
* Planting trees in disadvantaged communities, which help restore the urban tree canopy
* Building parks and community gardens, which increase greenspace in greenspace-poor urban areas
* Invasive species removal and native species replanting in parks and nature preserves in and around Los Angeles County
* Reducing fire fuel to protect people and property from wild fires
* Restoring habitat to improve the survivability of vulnerable species
* Leading clean-up activities and environmental education, which help to protect the coastal ecosystem
* Recycling beverage containers, used tires, used oil, and e-waste
* Rescuing food waste to reduce impact on landfills and edible foodstuffs help to feed people in need

Young Adult Corps is the foundational youth/workforce development program, and for three decades, it has successfully served as a platform for job training and personal development to transform the lives of at-risk youth from disadvantaged communities. A robust Corpsmember Development team delivers supportive services (case management, barrier removal, housing/transportation/childcare assistance, and medical/legal referrals) and transition assistance (job hunting, college applications). Our work sites—Northeast LA, South LA, East LA, Compton, northeast San Fernando Valley, and central San Fernando Valley—enable Corpsmembers to gain a variety of experiences working on conservation and community service projects all over Los Angeles County. Over the years, Los Angeles Conservation Corps has developed relationships with city, county, state, and federal governments, as well as many allied community-based organizations, implementing over 100 projects, totaling $18 million, which provide Corpsmembers with more than 300,000 hours of work (aggregate) every year.

Los Angeles Conservation Corps is proud to have transformed the lives of more than 20,000 young people since 1986. Young Adult Corps serves more than 400 young adults per year, completing over 300,000 hours of work experience and job training. In 2016, we adopted Green Career Pathways as a framework for organizing work, education, training, supportive services, and transition assistance into employer-advised curriculum tracks leading to job opportunities in growing green sectors.

Our lasting environmental accomplishments are evident in the trees planted, trails built, parks constructed, and community gardens enjoyed by children and families all over Los Angeles County.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Environmental Workforce Development Job Training Program changed training curriculum based on the experiences of program alumni and the requests of current program participants in order to align trainees better with real-world job openings. The Equity Team composed of board, staff, and clients recommended that a board member position be opened and dedicated to target population representation.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Los Angeles Conservation Corps
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Los Angeles Conservation Corps

Board of directors
as of 2/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Teresa Cisneros Burton

Focusing Philanthropy

Term: 2019 -


Board co-chair

Ms. Samantha Martinez

Kindel Gagen Public Affairs Advocacy

Term: 2019 -

Albert Chavez

KCET (ret.)

Mercedes Morton

Law Office of Mercedes Salomon Morton

Bryan LeRoy

Nixon Peabody

Dana Treister

Seyfarth Shaw

Dawn Wilson

Southern California Edison

Anne Freiermuth

Mission Math

Tom Eisenhauer

Renewable Resources Group

Anthony Gingiss

OneWeb

Barbara Romero

City of Los Angeles City Services

Nicolo Rusconi

BLVD Hospitality

Caroline Wittcoff

University of Southern California Gould School of Law

Jay Bell

TELACU Construction Management

Kecia Washington

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

Frank Lopez

Southern California Gas Company

Hildi Snodgrass

The Shalizi Group

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/11/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.