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LEVITT & QUINN FAMILY LAW CENTER

Strong Families. Stable Communities.

aka LevittQuinn Family Law Center   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  www.levittquinn.org

Mission

LevittQuinn - a nonprofit family law center protecting children and standing with family members in crisis.

Ruling year info

1988

Executive Director

Ms. Ana M. Storey

Main address

1557 Beverly Blvd

Los Angeles, CA 90026 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-4016750

NTEE code info

Legal Services (I80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We do this work because too many low-income Americans cannot get legal help when they need it. Here in Los Angeles County, family court filings exceed 92,000 per year. Despite their best efforts, the court does not have the funding to provide self-help resources to meet the growing needs of people who often cannot pay for private counsel and by design are prohibited from giving people the individualized legal advice they need to properly weigh their options in often emotionally charged circumstances. Roughly 80% of parents will stand in the family law courtroom alone, without benefit of meaningful legal help. They struggle to understand what is expected of them. They labor to give the court the critical information it needs to make life-altering decisions about the well-being of children, fair apportionment of assets and support, and protection from abuse.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Modest Means Project

The Modest Means Project ensures that people who make too much to qualify for traditional legal aid but too little to afford private counsel can find the legal help they need to successfully navigate the family court system.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Parents

The Kids Fund offers very low income parents free representation in family law cases that impact the safety and well-being of minor children including custody, child support, and domestic abuse.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Children and youth
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

The Veterans Project assists veterans to resolve unsettled family law issues such as the accrual of debt owed to the government and helps to remove barriers to employment and housing.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Veterans
Families
Parents
Economically disadvantaged people

The Adoption Project is the only one of its kind in Los Angeles County that helps families seeking to protect a child whose parent is unwilling or unable to care for the child by providing them with a permanent, loving home through private adoption.

Population(s) Served
Families
Foster and adoptive children
Foster and adoptive parents
Grandparents
Economically disadvantaged people

The Shriver Project, a groundbreaking project created by California’s Sargent Shriver Civil Counsel Act, provides free legal services to low-income families in high stakes, high conflict custody cases in which one side is represented by an attorney.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Families
Children and youth
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

The Beulah Fund is a resource to provide no-cost family law services for seniors or adults with disabilities living at or below 150% poverty.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Adults
People with disabilities
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Angels in Adoption Award 2012

Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of families served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of minors impacted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Dollar amount of legal help provided at little to no cost to our clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients receiving extended services beyond counsel and advice

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients who improved relationship with minor child(ren), other parent, and family members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients for whom we helped reduce the risk of homelessness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of successful adoptions we helped complete

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of court appearances on behalf of clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

LevittQuinn is a nonprofit family law center protecting children and standing with family members in crisis. There are seven thousand five hundred low-income Californian’s for every one legal aid attorney. Millions more Californians who cannot afford to pay a private lawyer are nonetheless ineligible for traditional legal aid. Most of those legal aid organizations who offer family law services limit their services to domestic violence matters, further narrowing the scope of accessible family law help. This is where LevittQuinn's unique limited scope service model that offers free and sliding scale family law services helps to fill the justice gap in Los Angeles County. Each year, thousands come to LevittQuinn from across Los Angeles County for the much-needed blend of both free and low-cost sliding scale legal services that only LevittQuinn provides. Our team of dedicated lawyers, legal assistants, and trained volunteers impact thousands of lives in Los Angeles County each year. We provide legal education about rights and responsibilities, advice and counsel, document preparation and filings, and representation in court. This year we expect to provide over $1 million dollars worth of free and low-cost legal services to our client families and impact the lives of more than 2,500 children in Los Angeles County and neighboring cities.

LevittQuinn provides family law legal services for poor and low-income families who are unable to obtain representation from other legal services providers or to afford private attorney representation. LevittQuinn attorneys provide legal representation at court hearings and trials and they provide legal advice and counsel in cases impacting the safety and well being of children. LevittQuinn's multi-pronged and flexible service delivery approach is unique among legal services organizations. In 2015, the California State Bar Civil Justice Taskforce issued a report reiterating that lack of adequate legal help can have dire consequences for families. That report highlights key innovations needed to address California's legal crisis. LevittQuinn employs three of those. First, a state-funded program made possible by the Sargent Shriver Civil Counsel Act supports the provision of free legal counsel in civil matters; we are proud to be part of this groundbreaking project that acknowledges the importance of representation in civil cases. Secondly, LevittQuinn provides limited scope representation, which allows us flexibility in our case-management and the ability to focus our attorney resources where they are needed most. Finally, our sliding scale fee structure allows people who earn too much for traditional legal services but too little to hire private counsel to find the help they need at LevittQuinn. Ongoing assessment of our service-delivery model is a critical component of our work helping families overcome the systemic barriers to resolving a family law case. A review of our demographic data revealed that many of our client families were traveling long distances to reach our office in Central Los Angeles. Despite our limited resources, we chose to make a commitment to meaningfully increase access to our services. LevittQuinn began by both deepening existing relationships and establishing new relationships with pro bono partners and community-based organizations whose mission and programs align with ours. Our main goal is to provide services where our clients live and work, and to empower them with the information they need to make decisions leading to long-term stability. Here are partnerships that LevittQuinn engaged with in 2022:1. Jenesse Center, Inc. Unite for Families Clinic 2. Families Uniting Families Project Fatherhood 3. Los Angeles County Bar Association Veterans Legal Services Project - Free Legal Clinic for Veterans sponsored by and in partnership with Simpson Thacher & Bartlett, LLP. 4. L.A. Law Library Lawyers in the Library 6. Southwestern Law School Alumni Association Domestic Violence Advocacy Initiative.

LevittQuinn's attorneys practice in key areas of family law including adoption, support, custody, visitation, domestic violence, guardianship, marital dissolution and paternity. LevittQuinn's legal team consists of staff attorneys, legal assistants, and volunteer attorneys. Director of Legal Services Lucia Reyes, who directly oversees our legal work as well as provides direct representation in adoption matters, has been a part of LevittQuinn's legal team since 2002. . Our entire organization is overseen by Executive Director, Ana M. Storey. Ms. Reyes and Ms. Storey have dedicated their collective 50-plus years of direct family law experience to serving our most vulnerable community members. In addition to staff supervision, LevittQuinn's Board of Director's Program Committee actively helps to oversee LevittQuinn's legal services. We have a formal process for the recruitment, training, and coordination of volunteers. Our volunteer numbers have greatly increased in recent years, thanks to increasing partnerships and having a dedicated Volunteer Coordinator on our staff. In 2021, 56 volunteers donated over $532,000 in reportable in-kind value, serving over 143 people throughout L.A. County and beyond via 13 virtual clinics.

Over 40 years ago, massive federal budget cuts decimated traditional legal services programs throughout the nation, resulting in drastic program cuts that jettisoned hundreds of clients with nowhere else to turn. In 1981, 400-plus Los Angeles family law clients averted a similar fate when our founders stepped in to take them on. Those women, then grandmothers, had the vision and courage to turn a dire situation into an opportunity for refuge and hope for those who would otherwise have fallen through the cracks. LevittQuinn has grown into a million dollar nonprofit organization run by professional staff with expertise in many areas of family and adoption law. We exist with the support of our donors to provide justice through affordable high-quality legal representation to low-income Los Angeles County families.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

LEVITT & QUINN FAMILY LAW CENTER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

LEVITT & QUINN FAMILY LAW CENTER

Board of directors
as of 01/31/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Chet Kronenberg

Hon. Aviva Bobb (Ret.)

Alternative Resolution Centers LLC

Michael Levitt

Retired Attorney

Hon. Keith Clemens (Ret.)

Alternative Resolution Centers LLC

Elizabeth Bock

O'Melveny & Myers LLP

Stephen J Henning

Wood, Smith, Henning & Berman LLP

Jeffery S Jacobson

Jacobson Family Law and Mediation

Scott M Klopert

Klopert & Ravden LLP

Alexandra Leichter

Leichter Leichter-Maroko LLP

Cari M Pines

Pines Law Group

Hon. Robert A Schnider (Ret.)

Alternative Resolution Centers LLC

Bonnie H Yaeger

Law & Mediation Office of Bonnie H. Yaeger

Dinah Ruch

Retired Family Law Attorney

Gwen Goldbloom

Television/Marketing Executive

Leena S Hingnikar

Hingnikar Family Law, APC

Ira M Friedman

Friedman & Friedman Lawyers

Spencer Lugash

Lugash Law Center

Ziva Naumann

Organization Co-Founder (Retired Office Administrator)

Hon. Joseph M Quinn

San Francisco Superior Court

Lorna Mouton Riff

CBIZ Forensic Consulting Group

Hon. Scott M. Gordon

Signature Resolution

Chet Kronenberg

Simpson Thacher & Bartlett, LLP

Parima Pandkhou

Wasser, Cooperman & Mandles, P.C.

Demetria Graves

The Graves Law Firm

Jeremy Salvador

Miod and Company LLP

Sara L. Chenetz

Perkins Coie LLP

Ashley W. Edwards

Walzer Melcher & Yoda LLP

Nolan Hiett

Hiett Law, P.C.

Marie LaMolinara

Meyer, Olson, Lowy & Meyers, LLP

Tigran Palyan

Storm Palyan LLP

Peter Scholze

AllianceBernstein

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/14/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/16/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.