CureSearch for Children's Cancer

Bethesda, MD   |  http://www.curesearch.org

Mission

CureSearch for Children's Cancer is working to end children's cancer. We know research that leads to the discovery and launch of new treatment therapies is the only way to get that done. We drive forward the innovative research needed now so children can live long and healthy lives. By accelerating the pace of cancer research via large, long term commitments to the most novel and promising science, we are driving to clinical use with children—not in ten years, not in five, but right now. We are building the kind of transformative partnerships that will increase collaboration, encourage invention, and develop targeted therapies to improve the quality of life for children. CureSearch welcomes donors who are ready for a breakthrough and who demand innovation and results to save lives now.

Ruling year info

1992

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Kay Koehler

Main address

4800 Hampden Lane Suite 200

Bethesda, MD 20814 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

National Children's Cancer Foundation

EIN

95-4132414

NTEE code info

Pediatrics Research (H98)

Cancer Research (H30)

Pediatrics (G98)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Sadly, every year about 15,300 children, teens and young adults in the United States and 35,000 children in the European Union are diagnosed with cancer. Cancer remains the number one disease killer of children and teens; in fact, one in eight children diagnosed in the U.S. will not survive. Those who do survive the often multi-year, toxic treatments to their growing bodies face lifelong, chronic health challenges. With 420,000 survivors in the U.S alone, this is devastating to the patients, families and loved ones struggling to face the reality of their situations. Parents are put in the position of saving their child now, knowing they are endangering their future. The small market size of this population, lack of funding (only 4% of government cancer funding is dedicated for pediatric cancer research) and limited interaction between scientists, pharmaceutical companies and the FDA have severely limited the number of new therapies developed specifically for pediatric cancers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Research Grants

A Unique Approach to Research and Drug Development

We’re laser-focused on driving new treatments to patients in an accelerated timeframe. We only fund projects with commercial potential, anticipated to reach patients in the clinic or marketplace within three to five years. Our translational, preclinical and clinical stage awards give preference to areas of high unmet need - the cancers with the lowest survival rates, fewest or most damaging treatment options, and populations that are underserved, including adolescents and young adults. Within the context of unmet need, we prioritize innovative therapies that have strong potential to lead to more effective and less-toxic therapies, including novel targeted therapeutics, immunotherapy and combination therapies. We support international research because the next game-changing discovery can come from anywhere, and international collaborations can unite the greatest minds for the development of the most effective cures.

Funding Priorities:
• Projects with commercial potential, anticipated to reach the clinic in an accelerated timeframe or already in clinical trials.
• Address barriers in areas of high unmet need, including high-risk, relapsed, or metastatic disease, cancers with limited or toxic treatment options, and adolescent and young adult patient populations
• Focus on innovative treatment modalities such as novel targeted therapeutics, immunotherapy, and combination therapies.
• Fund research from U.S., Canada, EU and Australia

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

CureSearch provides education and resources so that no child faces a cancer diagnosis and treatment without a fully equipped team behind them. Our resources include:

Educational Resources - On our website, we provide expert-vetted cancer resources and educational videos that are accessed by more than one million people each year.

CureSearch CancerCare mobile app - The CureSearch CancerCare app provides free, comprehensive cancer management capabilities that allow users to share the same information across multiple devices, making it possible for multiple caregivers to trade notes, schedules, symptoms, and resources about their child.

A Special Barbie® - Through a partnership with Mattel, we provide young cancer fighters with a special, brave Barbie. These bald dolls are a great way to help children better understand hair loss associated with treatment.

Clinical Trial Finder - Our clinical trial finder offers a simple way to identify clinical trials in any location that may benefit both current patients and the entire pediatric cancer community.

Population(s) Served
Families
Caregivers

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of patients, families, researchers and other interested parties accessing educational and scientific content available on the CureSearch web site.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Patient and Caregiver Resources

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CureSearch continues to be the defacto resource for any family dealing with a pediatric cancer diagnosis.

Percentage of projects advancing pediatric cancer drug development

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our grant portfolio is a continuum of translational, preclinical, and clinical research with the ultimate goal of bringing new and repurposed therapies to children with cancer.

Percentage of projects in clinical trial

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our grant portfolio is a continuum of translational to clinical research driving patient impact. The cumulative impact highlights our progress in drug development and patient-centered outcomes.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

For more than 30 years, CureSearch has been a driving force in pediatric cancer research. Recognizing a broken system, growing obstacles, and unmet needs in drug development, we’ve launched an innovative and unique strategy to address the urgent, critical need for new childhood cancer treatments.

We know that smarter research funding is just one part of the solution, and that long-term solutions will require a seismic shift to the existing pediatric drug development process and landscape. This change will require strategic collaboration among all players in the pediatric cancer ecosystem, including science, academia, regulatory, funding, patients and industry leaders.

Together, we’re changing the drug development landscape from within and accelerating the development of new treatments for the 43 children diagnosed with cancer each day.

With the expert leadership of our Scientific and Industry Advisory Councils, we identify and fund only the strongest research projects that address areas of unmet need and are most likely to quickly reach patients in the clinic or marketplace.

Translational research funding via our Young Investigator and Acceleration Initiative awards support novel projects that address areas of unmet need and are most likely to advance quickly to the clinic in 3-5 years. Through our Catapult Awards, we fund game-changing clinical trials – projects with established commercial potential that will impact patients in the clinic today and have the potential to provide a new, better standard of care for children everywhere.

We create connections and community between stakeholders by providing platforms for engagement to allow critical conversations to occur. CureSearch stakeholder meetings such as the annual CureSearch Summit and the first-of-its-kind IMPACT Series directly influence and advance pediatric cancer research and drug development.

At CureSearch, we’re uniquely positioned to drive critical stakeholder collaborations to accelerate the pace of pediatric drug development. Through our 30+-year reputation in childhood cancer research, we have developed relationships with the best cancer institutions in the country and the ability to attract preeminent scientists and leaders to our Scientific Advisory Council, Scientific Review Committee, and Industry Advisory Council. This allows us to develop the most forward-thinking research agenda, attract the best proposals for research projects, and to have them reviewed and ranked by the brightest minds in cancer research.

Since its inception in 2014, the Acceleration Initiative grants have resulted in impactful discoveries and generation of essential tools for the research community:

• 6 potential new therapies are ready for clinical trials
• 75 novel cell models developed
• 117 novel animal models created
• 276 patient biopsies studied
• 1 novel biomarker study developed
• Over 1.2 million compounds screened
• 2 clinical trials, one for medulloblastoma and one for Ewing sarcoma, supported by research conducted via the Acceleration Initiative
• 15 new drug targets identified

Since 2015, Young Investigators have accomplished the following:

• 3 clinical trials for adolescent/young adult transition
• 112 patient biopsies studied
• 39 novel cell models developed
• 16 novel animal models created
• 292 drug targets identified
• Over 100,000 compounds screened
• 5 RNAi screens performed
• 5 CRISPR-Cas9 screens conducted
• 3 genomic screens analyzing 20,000 genes

Financials

CureSearch for Children's Cancer
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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CureSearch for Children's Cancer

Board of directors
as of 2/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jared Brancazio

Raymond James

Paula Carter

Scott Carter Foundation

Michael Miller

Miller Tack & Madson

Annie Gould

Barboursville, VA

Hank Adams

Kiewit Infrastructure Group

Kathy Wanner

Abundant Venture Partners

Sam Blackman

Day One Biopharmaceuticals

Shari Collier

St. David’s HealthCare

Cason Carter

Citadel, LLC

David Kupiec

National CineMedia

Brenda Weigel

University of Minnesota’s Masonic Cancer Center

David Whan

Pearce Services

Trent Demulling

Kiewit

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data