New Directions for Veterans

New Directions for Veterans empowers men and women who served in the military, and their families, to lead productive and fulfilling lives.

aka NDI   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  www.ndvets.org

Mission

New Directions for Veterans (NDVets) was founded in 1992 by Vietnam War veterans John Keaveney and Larry Williams, who saw the need to provide integrated assistance for homeless veterans in Los Angeles County (LA County), California. Today, NDVets serves over 800 veterans each year and operates from a 60,000 square-foot facility co-located and incorporated into the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System campus. Our mission is to empower men and women who served in the military, and their families, to lead productive and fulfilling lives—with an overarching goal to end homelessness among former service members. As such, NDVets offers comprehensive services directly and via referral, including case management, substance abuse treatment, mental health care, health care, and more.

Ruling year info

1989

Executive Director

Mr. Leo Cuadrado

Main address

11303 Wilshire Blvd VA Bldg 116

Los Angeles, CA 90073 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-4242745

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Alcohol, Drug Abuse (Treatment Only) (F22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The California Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) reports that more veterans live within a 50-mile radius of the NDVets HQ than in 42 other states combined. High housing costs and unemployment rates in Los Angeles also mean more homeless veterans live near us than in any other U.S. urban area. For veterans struggling with physical impairments, mental illnesses, and substance use disorders after discharge, the difficulty in obtaining or maintaining housing and employment is compounded. Currently, 34.8% of our veterans suffer from chronic health conditions, 77.7% from physical and/or mental disabilities, 63.2% from mental health problems, 37.2% from substance abuse issues, and 49.5% from recent homelessness. In addition, 38.3% of our veterans are age 62 or older and 77.6% report an annual income of $20,000 or less—with 40.5% reporting an annual income of $10,000 or less. Many of our veterans are low-income, elderly, disabled, and desperately in need of assistance.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Veteran Opportunity Center (VOC)

The VOC is a 161-bed transitional housing facility dedicated to homeless male veterans and includes 35 bridge housing beds, 58 low-demand housing beds, and 68 clinical treatment beds.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Veterans
People with psychosocial disabilities
Substance abusers

NDVets operates twelve PSH communities in LA County, providing 571 units to veterans and their families along with comprehensive supportive housing services.

Population(s) Served
Family relationships
Veterans
Homeless people
Substance abusers
People with psychosocial disabilities

The Oasis program supports female veterans living in our PSH communities, by providing supportive services either directly or by referral to help them reach stability and independence after discharge.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Homeless people
Veterans
Homeless people
Veterans
Homeless people
Veterans
Homeless people

All veterans have access to integrated behavioral health services embedded into each assistance program at NDVets. Our trauma-informed treatment approach includes various strategies tailored to individual needs, interests, and abilities. Behavioral health services include substance use disorder treatment; individual, group, and family therapy; military sexual trauma services; a neurofeedback clinic; and psychiatry care.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Substance abusers
Veterans
Homeless people
Family relationships

This program offers intensive mental health treatment for the most severe cases.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Veterans
Homeless people
Family relationships
People with psychosocial disabilities

Case managers work with each Veteran to help navigate service delivery, provide follow-up, and ensure success in achieving their goals.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Family relationships
Homeless people
People with psychosocial disabilities
Substance abusers

For needed services not provided directly by NDVets, we provide referrals and linkage services for veterans and their families. These services include vocational training, educational services, employment assistance, mental health care, substance use services, healthcare, family services, financial assistance, and legal services.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Veterans
Homeless people
Veterans
Homeless people
Veterans
Homeless people
Veterans
Homeless people
Veterans
Families
People with psychosocial disabilities
Substance abusers

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of veterans served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Case Management

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of veterans served in emergency housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

The Veteran Opportunity Center (VOC)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of veterans served in transitional housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

The Veteran Opportunity Center (VOC)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of veterans served in permanent supportive housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of female veterans served in the Oasis for Women Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

The Oasis for Veteran Women (Oasis)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of veterans served in the Full Service Partnership (FSP) program.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

The Full-Service Partnership Program (FSP) –

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our vision is “to empower men and women who served in the military, and their families, to lead productive and fulfilling lives.” While NDVets provides multiple services to support veterans and their families, our prevailing aspiration is to end veteran homelessness in Los Angeles County. To achieve this goal and fulfill our greater mission, NDVets offers our comprehensive VOC, PSH, Oasis, and FSP programs in addition to behavioral healthcare, case management, and linkage to services.

NDVets also has several goals for the future, subject to change based on the evolving needs of our veterans, the community-at-large, and our organizational funding. Our long-term goals include developing more housing programs, increasing veteran outreach, and increasing veteran enrollment. Our short-term plans include: finishing the construction of three (3) additional PSH communities; growing our Neurofeedback Clinic by increasing the number of sites where the service is provided; increasing clinical treatment access for female veterans; and expanding our FSP program.

NDVets address the complex needs of our veteran clients through comprehensive supportive services ranging from case management to therapy to permanent supportive housing. Many veterans come to us vulnerable and impoverished. However, NDVets aims to give them a fresh start in life from the moment of program intake. Upon program entry, NDVets provides new clothing and hygiene supplies to all veterans enrolled in one of our three Transitional Housing Programs at the Veteran Opportunity Center (VOC). Depending on the veteran’s needs, veterans may be enrolled into: a) the Bridge Housing Program designed for veterans who are “housing-ready” and have a current and established housing plan, with an average length of stay is 3 to 6 months; b) the Low-Demand Housing Program designed for high-barrier, chronically homeless veterans with or without housing plan, who are most resistant to intervention, with an average length of stay up to 24 months; or c) the Clinical Treatment Program designed for homeless veterans with substance use disorders and/or co-occurring mental health issues; with an average length of stay up to 24 months.

All veterans have access to additional services as needed during enrollment—such as behavioral healthcare, case management, and linkage to services—and may receive multiple services concurrently. Integrated behavioral health services, for example, are embedded into each assistance program at NDVets. Our trauma-informed treatment approach includes various strategies tailored to individual needs, interests, and abilities. Our behavioral health services include substance use disorder treatment; individual, group, and family therapy; military sexual trauma services; a neurofeedback clinic; and psychiatry care. In-house case managers also work with each veteran to help navigate service delivery, provide follow-up, and ensure success in achieving their goals. For needed services not provided directly by NDVets, we provide referrals and linkage services for veterans and their families.

NDVets leverages our CLARITY Software, County-Wide Coordinated Entry System (CES) database, sign-in sheets, transportation logs, and other manual records to track quantitative and qualitative measures towards achieving program outcomes. These measures include progressive data on client demographics, referrals, follow-up visits, program attendance, assessment results, travel records, outreach, and group activities related to overall stabilization and recovery post-discharge. Case managers and residential service coordinators (RSCs) collect information at program intake and subsequent points to track client progress and adjust milestones, short-term goals, counseling schedules, and other activities needed to prove program success.

Our agency remains dedicated to ensuring veterans have access to sufficient food, groceries, and basic living supplies throughout their recovery and stabilization process. Accordingly, we receive food, supplies, and funds throughout the year from various donors to support the veterans enrolled in our assistance programs. Our service delivery model provides comprehensive services either directly or through contracts and cooperative referral arrangements and, as such, partnerships are key components of our program. NDVets recognizes that multiple solutions are needed to provide a sustainable safety net—no one agency can address and resolve the numerous factors impacting our veterans. Partnerships with other community-based providers and area nonprofits therefore expand NDVet’s capacity to serve more veterans, provide a more comprehensive array of care, and share resources that meet the needs of our veteran population.

In addition to partnerships with community-based providers, NDVets also contracts and partners with several government entities. These include the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA), Los Angeles Department of Mental Health, Los Angeles County Emergency Food and Shelter Program, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), U.S. Department of Labor's Homeless Veteran Reintegration Project, and Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority. We also participate in several community groups and collaboratives. These memberships inform us of veteran needs, gaps in service, and additional partnership and service opportunities. As such, NDVets is proud to participate in or be a member of the Westside Shelter and Hunger Coalition (WSHC), Los Angeles Veterans Collaborative, LAHSA's 200-provider Continuum of Care, County Department of Mental Health Needs Assessment and Planning Process, Service Area Advisory Council, West Side Mental Health Network, Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP), and Local Veterans' Employment Representative (LVER).

NDVets successfully served 803 unduplicated veterans in 2020. Of those 803 veterans, 210 were provided transitional housing, 435 were provided permanent supportive housing, 158 were provided emergency housing, and 176 took part in our Full Service Partnership (FSP) program. Of the 210 veterans provided with transitional housing, 53% went on to secure permanent supportive housing or permanent housing. Meanwhile, 100% of the 435 veterans who already had permanent supportive housing retained their living arrangements. Additionally, our FSP program resulted in a 90% reduction in emergency room, psychiatric hospital, and incarceration stays. Three-quarters (75%) of FSP patients also experienced a decline in psychiatric symptoms alongside increased stabilization, self-sufficiency, and self-determination. Of those who enrolled in our Clinical Treatment Program, 100% accessed mental health services, including individual and group therapy, neurofeedback, and psychiatry. Furthermore, participating veterans reported a 65% decrease in mental health symptoms and socio-emotional functions based on periodic surveys.

Financials

New Directions for Veterans
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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New Directions for Veterans

Board of directors
as of 6/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rudy Grimaldo

No affiliation

Term: 2019 - 2021

Rudy Grimaldo

Sovereign Healthcare

Jennifer Kim

State of California

Elijah Adams

Faith Electric and General Building Contractors

Mark Robeson

Union Bank

Marty Whelan

Northrup Grumman

Elijah Adams

Faith Electric and General Building Contractors, LLC

Darin Selnick

Independent Consultant

David Baylor

Former DirecTV Vice President

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/04/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability