Foothill Unity Center, Inc.

Helping People, Changing Lives

Monrovia, CA   |  www.foothillunitycenter.org

Mission

Foothill Unity Center helps neighbors in crisis attain self-sufficiency by partnering with the community and using our resources wisely to provide vital support services with love and dignity. Foothill Unity Center envisions a community where *All have their basic needs met, including the need to give, *All get the necessary support to become self-sufficient, *All are treated with love and dignity ... all the time. The Center is a federally designated Community Action Agency, part of a network of 47 organizations in California and 1,100 in the country, that combat poverty. Our target population covers the Foothills portion of SPA 3, which includes Altadena, Arcadia, Azusa, Baldwin Park, Bradbury, Duarte, Irwindale, Monrovia, Pasadena, Sierra Madre, South Pasadena and Temple City.

Ruling year info

1996

Executive Director

Ms. Betty R. McWilliams

Main address

790 W. Chestnut Avenue

Monrovia, CA 91016 USA

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EIN

95-4310817

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Need: In our service area’s urban population, 10% live below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL); and 23% of the population, that is 107,224 individuals, live below 150% of Poverty. LA County has the highest California Poverty Measure in the state: 24.3% of the population lack enough resources to meet basic needs. LACDPH measures food insecurity at 22%. Unemployment, including those marginally attached and part time for economic reasons, is 10.4%. Poverty is exacerbated by the high cost of housing; the cost of housing index is 432 (compared to a U.S. average of 100). 60% of our clients pay more than half of their income in rent; 14% are homeless. Per the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority’s 2019 Homeless Count, 5,021 people are homeless in the San Gabriel Valley (SPA 3). The California Housing Partnership (CHP) reports that “renters in Los Angeles County need to earn … more than 3 times the minimum wage, to support the median monthly asking rent."

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

One-Stop Multi-Service Community Action Agency

Foothill Unity Center is the region’s primary provider of integrated services that focus on homelessness prevention and homeless services to help the disadvantaged, low-income individuals and families who are underserved to move out of poverty. Foothill Unity Center plays a unique role in the community by leveraging its food pantry to be a one-stop multi-service center. When a family first comes to the Center for help with food, they find a safe and welcoming environment where health and social service case managers are available to help develop a plan and provide advocacy, resources and referrals. The overall goal of the Center is to help families become more stable as they strive toward self-sufficiency. This is done with love and dignity through our programs for food, health, crisis case management, housing and homeless, job development, all supported by our volunteer program.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

The Center’s Food Program helps people maintain good health and helps people to stabilize their finances through the distribution of 3 million pounds of food annually.

• Each month, families/individuals receive enough food -- canned, dry, frozen, & refrigerated food, baked goods, dairy products, and fresh produce, including USDA foods -- to supplement nourishment for about ten days.

• Families/individuals may return for perishable foods (bread, dairy and fresh produce) once a week.

• Substantial bag lunches, with enough food to last about two days, are available three times a week for the homeless. Made up of sandwiches, instant soups, snack-foods, fresh fruit, drinks, flip-top canned foods, sweets, and canned meats, these bag lunches are given to people who are homeless or have no place to store or cook food.

• Groceries are delivered to the homes of home-bound senior and disabled persons, providing a welcome source of contact to an otherwise isolated population.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Our Health Program is designed to diminish health disparities with access to healthcare, education on ways to manage chronic health diseases, and assistance with navigating the healthcare system. With numerous community partners, the Center helps people attain a sustainable, healthy lifestyle through the following activities:

• On-site screenings for blood pressure, HIV, glucose, BMI (body mass index) – available during food distributions
• Referrals for no cost X-Rays, lab tests, pap smears, TB testing, immunizations, mental health counseling, etc.
• Coordinated care and case management guidance
• On-site vision and dental exams with healthcare partners’ mobile units
• Annual pediatric mobile dental clinic with the participation of USC’s Ostrow School of Dentistry
• Nutrition and health workshops
• Weekly exercise classes
• Enrollment in Covered California and other insurance

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

The Center’s Housing program helps people with emergency or chronic housing needs through the following activities:

• Eviction Prevention services including rental assistance and utility assistance
• Motel vouchers, as a bridge to permanent housing, coupled with a plan of action to obtain housing
• Housing readiness assistance (to secure one’s ID, social security number, birth certificate, and income source)
• Participation in the Coordinated Entry System that permanently and rapidly houses chronically homeless families and individuals.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

The Center’s Job Development Program offers opportunities to learn marketable skills, gain good work habits and career specific knowledge, skills, and experiences; as a means to become employable and increase household income. The program includes:

• Job Developer counseling on-site at the Center
• Training, certifications, mentoring and on-the-job practical experience at the Center through its role as a government agency placement site for work experience programs
• Job search and financial literacy workshops
• Field training for nursing students and interns
• Referrals to community agencies for training, job search and placement

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Center's Crisis Case Management Program is the driving strategy and standard of care practice that supports our core programs. We provide assessment, case planning, and follow-up; including advocacy, care coordination, and resource linkages. The Center provides a variety of additional emergency and socials services including the following:

• Urgent and sensitive support for victims of domestic violence and victims of violent crimes (crimes that involve guns or weapons)
• Bus tokens, Foothill Transit vouchers and taxi vouchers to access food, job search and medical appointments
• Enrollment in the CalFresh program
• Free cell phones through the LifeLine program
• Free tax preparation with certified tax preparers through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program.
• As a Community Action Agency, we are also a designated FEMA location. We will continue to be the anchor to our San Gabriel Valley community whenever needed to anyone needing assistance.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Annual Back-to-School Event:
The Center’s Annual Back to School event is held in August at the Santa Anita Park in Arcadia for more than 1,000 children of low-income families, kindergarten through age 26. With the help of the community, the Center provides backpacks and school supplies; new school uniforms and clothing including underwear, socks and shoe gift cards; dental and vision screenings; and information on colleges and apprenticeships. At this fair-like event, children also receive haircuts, manicures, and information on an array of services to help them start the school year with confidence.

Thanksgiving and Holiday Distributions:
Each year, individuals and groups from local schools, businesses, civic organizations, police and fire departments donate items and volunteer to make our holiday events a happier time for our families. Held in Ayers Hall at the Los Angeles County Arboretum, the events provide families with generous food baskets that include all the trimmings for traditional Thanksgiving and Holiday meals. At the Holiday distribution, families also receive new toys and clothing for their children.

Golden Plate Event:
The Annual Golden Plate Event has become a highlight of many community calendars. The Golden Plate Event is an annual fundraising luncheon and award ceremony. Foothill Unity Center honors individuals, organizations, and businesses that have provided extraordinary support to Foothill Unity Center and the community.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

The Center's volunteer program leverages our small staff of 24. Nearly 6,000 volunteers, from 3 to 93 years of age, provide more than 40,000 hours annually to help provide all our programs and special events.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Community Action Agency of the Foothills 2018

Awards

Tony Collier Award 2016

Los Angeles Regional Food Bank

Beacon Award 2015

Bolton Foundation

2019 Lisa Magno Award 2019

Monrovia Providers Group

California Nonprofit of the Year 2019

California State Elected Officials, Chris Holden

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of unduplicated individuals who received food, health and other vital social services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Food

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of unduplicated homeless individuals who received substantial bag lunches and other vital health and housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Food

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of housing services provided, that included eviction prevention, securing temporary or permanent housing, and becoming housing ready

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Housing and Homeless

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of coordinated care services for health needs through Medical Outreach and Referrals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Health

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of health screenings for blood pressure and glucose/diabetes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Health

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of services provided for eye screenings, exams, and eye glasses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Health

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of dental services/procedures through mobile dental clinics

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Health

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Foothill Unity Center is the region’s primary provider of integrated services that focus on homelessness prevention and homeless services to help the disadvantaged, low-income individuals and families who are underserved to move out of poverty and achieve economic stability. The Center has the following more specific goals:

1) Provide low-income families and individuals sufficient food and nutrition education to maintain good health and stabilize their finances;

2) Help families in crisis, with emphasis on women and children or those new to homelessness, to remain housed or to transition out of homelessness.

3) Furnish low-income families and children with reliable access to health care services and health education;

4) Improve the economic lives of low-income and homeless individuals with hands on assistance to gain employment for those unemployed and underemployed.

5) Educate the community on various poverty, health and community well-being issues, including the importance of volunteerism and giving back.

1) Be a one-stop service provider with integrated services that complete a continuum of care
To ensure that the Center’s offerings align with best practices, Foothill Unity Center compares itself to the elements identified in the Social Determinants of Health Model -- to provide wrap-around services that complete a continuum of care.

2) Collaborate with the community to ensure capacity
The Center collaborates with more than 100 agencies. Just a few examples include the following. Most of the nutritious food distributed to clients is donated. The Center’s trucks pick up food from the LA Regional Food Bank and local grocery stores and bakeries. The Cal State Los Angeles Nursing Program and the Asuza Pacific Nursing Program both provide interns who administer health care screenings on-site at the Center. Tzu Chi Medical Foundation provides vision and dental care with their mobile units, on-site. Huntington Hospital provides blood pressure and glucose screenings and pop-up health clinics at the Center. The Center's staff works with the Coordinated Entry System (CES) network to enable rental assistance and rapid rehousing.

Staff recruited and managed nearly 6,000 volunteers in 2018.

This past year, the Center served as a placement/training site for 6 interns in social work and public health, 69 nursing students, and for government-funded workforce programs that provided paid on-the-job training to 39 work experience trainees. The benefits extend beyond the work experience and the training that the students, interns, and participants receive. The benefits also impact our community with the expanded staff capacity they provide to our organization to serve more clients.

3) Provide education along with basic services to improve sustainability
For example, the Center provides exercise groups and nutrition education & recipes during food distributions. The Center provides basic financial literacy workshops. Similarly, the Center provides the means for clients to monitor their health, to take some control over their well-being.

Foothill Unity Center plays a unique role in the community by leveraging its food pantry to be a one-stop service center. When a family first comes to the Center for help with food, they find a safe and welcoming environment where health and social services case managers are available to help develop a plan and provide advocacy, resources and referrals. Current programs address the following needs as defined in the Social Deterimants of Health Model: housing & transit, family& social support, employment, education, access to care, diet & exercise.

Foothill Unity Center’s Community Action Agency (CAA) designation and the requirements attached to the designation have helped to shape the Center. We involve the participation of the whole community in the goal to reduce and eliminate poverty, which includes elected public officials, private sector representatives, and particularly low-income residents to assess the needs and address the causes of poverty. As an agency, we have always responded to the needs of our community and ensured that we found resources to meet their needs, never turning anyone away. The Center is led by a tripartite Board of Directors, with one-third who are elected officials or representatives, one-third who are among our organization’s low-income clients, or representatives, and one-third who are local community or business members.

The Center is committed to maintaining a highly regarded professional staff (24 employees) that can attract and lead the community partners, volunteers and interns needed.

In 2018, Foothill Unity Center moved into a new 28,000 sq ft location in Monrovia. with private spaces for more community partners to work with clients – and spacious rooms to be a venue for workshops in nutrition, disease prevention and financial literacy. The Center continues to also operate from its second location in Pasadena.

In 2018, Foothill Unity Center served 3,200 low income families representing more than 6,500 unduplicated individuals. The Center provided 52,000 services that included 21,482 food orders, 10,773 health services, and 6,114 case management services.

We continuously assess and enhance our programs to address feedback and the needs of the community. For example, this past year, in response to the growing need in the community, the Center prioritized the development of its Job Development Program. We hired a full-time Job Development Manager to build employer relations and to increase the effectiveness of our job development offerings. Our program addresses job readiness with academic and vocational counseling, resume assistance, certifications, mentoring, and financial literacy workshops. We provide assistance with job search and employment placement and referrals to community agencies for training. At each of our sites, we have information for job leads, offer vouchers for those who need appropriate clothing for job interviews, and provide bus tokens and taxi vouchers to remove transportation barriers. We host sessions where clients can meet and interview with staffing agencies at our sites for potential job opportunities. These services are particularly effective because they are available at the Center where people are picking up food. We are now preparing a 10 week course in Career Readiness and are planning a Career Fair for 2020.

With these opportunities to learn marketable skills, gain good work habits and career specific knowledge, skills, and experiences, our clients will be able to increase household income and gain economic security. This program directly addresses the community's need for homelessness prevention and homeless services.

Foothill Unity Center’s Board of Directors and staff are dedicated and committed to sustain our services and as a result have focused on expanding the capacity of our fundraising efforts. This includes the development of the Development Department Team with staffing, infrastructure, and processes that will support the growing needs in funds to sustain our programs and organization. Our fundraising includes government grants, foundations, businesses, corporations, faith-based organizations, service clubs and other organizations, individuals, and special events. Our diversified revenue sources help to assure that services are not disrupted due to discontinuation of funding from any one source.

What’s Next? Build capacity & enhance services by leading Community teams to provide critical services where people can most easily find them.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Foothill Unity Center, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Foothill Unity Center, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 3/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Gary Kovacic

Foothill Unity Center, Inc.

Term: 2020 - 2021

Alice Wang

Tzu Chi Foundation

Brian Barreto

California American Water Company

Tom Daly

Intellectual Properties Attorney

Lois Gaston

Duarte City Council (Past Mayor)

Ulises Gutierrez

YMCA Youth Alliance

Karen Herrera

Deputy Director, City of Duarte

Terry Keenan

Pastor, Santa Anita Church

Kay Kinsler

Arcadia Unified School District

Gary Kovacic

Sullivan Workman & Dee LLP

Mary Ann Lutz

Policy Advisor

Donald Schweitzer

Family Law Specialist

Katherine Thorossian

Monrovia Unified School District

Greg Vanni

Attorney at Thon Beck Vanni Callahan and Powell

Linda Vidov

Top Commercial Realty, Inc.

Brian Vosberg

Attorney at Vosberg & Associates

Cruz Baca

Baldwin Park Council Member

Gordon Amerson

Superintendent, Duarte Unified School District

Mary Saenz

San Gabriel Basin Water Quality Authority

Margaux Viera

Community Volunteer

Siberell Pete

Santa Anita Park

Lopez Tomas

LA County Housing Authority

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/11/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data