Educating Students Together, Inc.

Opening the doors of college opportunity since 1987

Los Angeles, CA   |  estcap.org

Mission

Educating Students Together, Incorporated is a nonprofit dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty and improving the quality of life for foster and low-income youth by helping them access and complete postsecondary education.

Notes from the nonprofit

We have been opening the doors of college opportunities​ since 1987.

Ruling year info

2003

President/CEO

Gregory Keith Delahoussaye Mr.

Co Principal Officer

Dr. Yasmin Delahoussaye

Main address

13101 W. Washington Blvd. Suite 452

Los Angeles, CA 90066 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Educational Student Tours, Inc.

EIN

95-4401305

NTEE code info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to USA Today, the college-going gap between Black and white Americans was always bad, and now it's getting worse. Since 2010, the number of Black graduating high school seniors has declined by 29%. In other words, one in every three Black graduating high school seniors is not going to college, or even a trade school. According to the Pew Charitable Trust, when foster youth leave high school and do not enroll in college, within two to four years, many experience unemployment, go on public assistance, battle homelessness, or become involved in the criminal justice system. The outcomes for foster youth who do attend college are equally as direr. Less than 3% of former foster youth ever graduate from college without the support of a warm and caring individual.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

College application assistance

We guide students through all stages of the college application process.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Awards

Biddy Mason Award for Leadership 2019

LACCD Black Faculty & Staff Association

Community Service 2017

College of Alameda

Scholarship Honoree 2016

Bridge Builders Foundation

Community Honoree 2016

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority

Tribute to Black Women Community Leaders 1995

National Council of Negro Women

Fiat Lux 2024

UCLA

Woman of the Year 2024

Los Angeles County

Affiliations & memberships

Southern California College Access Program Network 2020

Black Equity Collective 2020

Give Blck 2020

Greater Los Angeles African American Chamber of Commerce 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of program graduates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Students who enroll in college after the tour.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Working to transition foster-youth out of the foster care system into college.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

College application assistance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These numbers only relate to our high school seniors. We have college students who also receive scholarships, but we are not able to track those.

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

College application assistance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of academic scholarships awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

College application assistance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of foster youth enrolled in college

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

College application assistance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We have funding to work with 20 foster youth a year. We hope to increase funding to be able to serve more foster youth.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

While less than 1% of high school students ever receive a full-ride scholarship (i.e., tuition, housing, books, transportation, and supplies), 60% of EST's College Access Program participants received one. Our goals are to not only improve the percentage of students who apply to highly selective or selective colleges and find the money to pay for it but we also work on the following sub-set of goals.

1) 95 % of all program participants will receive at least one scholarship for college.
2) 60% of all program participants will receive a full-ride college scholarship.
3) 80% of students who complete the program will attain an average or above-average score on their SAT.
4) 100% of all program participants will be accepted to and enroll in a four-year college.
5) At least 60% of students complete a degree within six years.
6) 100% will complete their financial aid modules, ensuring that they will make sound financial decisions in the future.

Our internal evaluation process includes gathering baseline data during student intake, tracking the services delivered to each student, surveying students and parents, collecting college acceptance and enrollment data, and tracking students through their college careers Projected outcomes are based on past program performance.

College Counseling and Preparation. We begin working with students as soon as they enter our program to ensure that they are completing and passing the A-G courses (classes required for college entrance). Next, we help them identify colleges that will best suit them, even offering fully funded tours of colleges across the country. We guide them through their college essays and applications and assist them in developing a brag sheet to help their teachers and counselors write strong letters of recommendation. Tutoring is provided to students in need of additional academic support and all our students participate in a 12-week ACT prep course to help them achieve the highest score possible. (The ACT is a standardized test comparable to the SAT but, is widely considered to be a more equitable testing instrument for students of color.) High ACT scores are critical to both the college admissions and scholarship application processes if students are interested in full-ride (tuition, housing, books, and supplies) scholarships. Wi-fi hotspots are provided on an as-needed basis to ensure students can consistently participate.

Mentoring and Networks of Support. Monthly mentoring sessions begin during students' first days with the program and continue through college. This year we are adding a summer peer mentoring component, connecting high school seniors with college students from our program, and expanding their network of peer support. Research shows that mentorship is a highly effective non-academic strategy to support the success of foster youth and it is considered a best practice. The strong bonds that our students and mentors develop facilitate trust and open communication. Students know that they dont need to wait for the next mentoring session, they can reach out to their mentor whenever they need help. Once a student has started college, their mentor will help them navigate campus resources, connect with other EST students on campus or at other nearby schools, and guide them in the development of a positive, supportive network on campus. Our students know they are never alone.

Financial Coaching and Support. As early as their junior year of high school, our counselors help students identify and apply for scholarships to help pay for college. Two years ago, we launched the Scholarship Club, which engages parents/guardians of our students in the process of helping to research and identify scholarships. On the first Sunday of every month, we host a meeting of the Scholarship Club. The only rule is that each person has to bring at least two new scholarships to share with the group. We also help students complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

The internal resources that we have for meeting our goals include dedicated staff and board members (N=10) who are primarily higher education professors or former college administrators, and a cadre of experts who volunteer (N=50) to assist our program participants in the area of writing college and scholarship essays to stand out from the crowd, standardized test preparation, and mentoring. The external resources that we have include strong community partnerships. Our partners include:

County of Los Angeles Department of Children and Family Servicesrefer foster youth
L.A. County Office of Education-refer foster youth
L.A.U.S.D. -refer foster and low-income students
San Fernando Valley Advocates-refer students
Village Nation-refer low-income students
United Friends of the Children-invitation to college recruitment event for foster families
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority-provide volunteer mentors
College Path Los Angeles-provide training for the volunteer mentors
CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children)-refer foster youth
She Ready (Tiffany Haddishs Foundation)-refer foster youth
Project Joy -refer foster youth
Youth with a Purpose-refer foster youth
Faith Foster Families Network-we work with this organization through Holman United Methodist Church to recruit foster youth
Southern California College Access Network-hold meetings for 100 nonprofits working in the college planning and access space
Brotherhood Crusade-refer students and donate
Valero Energy Company-sponsor of our ACT prep class
Microsoft- features our program in their annual give event for employees
Sony Pictures Entertainment funds materials needed for summer school
The Gene Hale Foundation-major donor
The Matthew and Roberta Jenkins Foundation-major donor
Bank of America-major donor
Greater Los Angeles African American Chamber of Commerce-refer students
Walmart -donate
Union Bank-annual donor





$4.3 million in institutional scholarships was awarded to program participants last year to increase this amount every year.
80% of program participants increased their standardized test scores.
5,135 students have been served
350 is the average number of program participants each year.
100% are accepted into four-year colleges.
Alumni work in the fields of medicine, engineering, and education, as chemists, research scientists, art historians, etc.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals, To understand what we should keep or change the following year.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Educating Students Together, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Educating Students Together, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 03/12/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Celeste Wall

Dr. Charlotte Forte-Parnell

Retired administrator/Antelope Valley College

Dr. Lance Robert

Professor of Political Science/ Los Angeles Southwest College

Cynthia Barnett

Retired Professor of Sociology/Moorpark College

Dr. Yasmin Delahoussaye

Retired college president/Los Angeles Southwest College

Gregory Delahoussaye

President/CEO of Educational Student Tours

Celeste Wall

Board Chair/Educational Student Tours

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/18/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/30/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.