Public, Society Benefit

Educational Student Tours Inc

An award winning nonprofit

aka Black College Tours   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  blackcollegetours.org

Mission

The mission of Educational Student Tours, Inc. is to create the opportunity for foster and low-income tour participants to attend four-year Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in order to transform their lives.

Notes from the nonprofit

We create life-changing opportunities for foster and low-income youth. Please call us to find out how you can get involved.

Ruling year info

2003

President/CEO

Gregory Keith Delahoussaye Mr.

Main address

5014 Shenandoah Ave

Los Angeles, CA 90056 USA

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EIN

95-4401305

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Los Angeles is home to 34,847 children in the foster care system. Of that number, 8,312 are currently in high school. Data shows that nationally the percent of foster youth who will obtain a bachelor's degree is 2 to 9%. Some of the barriers that make it di cult to plan for college careers include: being newly eman- cipated from foster care without family or nancial support; homelessness and poverty. Our program is designed to overcome that statistic by providing students with connections to a caring adult and colleges with supportive environments. EST is also helping low-income students residing in single-family households. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the proportion of black children living in a single-parent home is 55 percent. Living with a single parent reduces a child's chances of graduating from college. Proactively, we created our non-pro t to address these societal issues.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Tuition assistance

We provide matching funds to what family and friends contribute to help students with their tuition.

Population(s) Served
Minorities
Budget
$100,000

We introduce students to our nation's historically black colleges by taking them on 5 to 6 day tours.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)
Adults
Budget
$1,000,000

We provide assistance with finding the right college, applying to college, and writing personal statements

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)
Budget
$0

We mentor participants of our program for the four years they are in college.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)
Budget
$0

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of program graduates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Related Program

Comprehensive tours of Black Colleges

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Over the course of 32 years, Educational Student Tours has had 5100 tour participants.

Students who enroll in college after the tour.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years),Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related Program

Comprehensive tours of Black Colleges

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Working to transition foster-youth out of the foster care system into college.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Related Program

Comprehensive tours of Black Colleges

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

According to the Public Policy Institute (2016), if current trends in the labor market persist by 2030, California will have a shortage of 1.1 million workers (up from 1 million last year) holding a bachelor's degree. The vast majority of this shortage occurs when African American students do not enter and graduate from college. California is home to the nation's fifth largest Black population but Black students are only about half as likely as whites to hold a degree. In California, 40% of the working-aged population hold four-year degrees, but only 23% of African Americans have one. Many Black students want a degree and enroll in college but do not make it to graduation day, an opportunity ripe for addressing.

Our strategies include recruiting students for our program who are majoring in science, technology, engineering, math, and healthcare. These are the critical areas in the California workforce where there is little to no diversity. After recruiting these students, we work hard to match them to donors who fund scholarships or internships for students with these majors, thereby almost guaranteeing that they will finish. Other strategies that we employ include tuition assistance, assistance with finding the right college, assistance with college, financial aid, year round housing and scholarship applications, comprehensive tours of historically black colleges and universities with a proven track record of helping students graduate within four years, and mentoring during four years of college.

The internal resources that we have for meeting our goals include a dedicated staff and board members who are primarily higher education professors or former college administrators, a budget that will reach over $1 million this year, and a cadre of experts who volunteer to assist our program participants in the area of financial aid, scholarship searches, coaching and mentoring. The external resources that we have include strong partnerships (United Parcel Service, Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, Genentech Pharmaceutical, Southern California Edison, Bridge Builders Foundation and the Children, Youth and Family Collaborative), our network of Black churches and the influence of the pastors that lead those churches.

We know that we are making progress because we collect both qualitative and quantitative data. We measure the percentage of program participants who enter four-year colleges, percentage of program participants who attend HBCUs, the percentage of program participants who enter the workforce, their job title, major, and year they graduated. Our volunteers collect the data using surveys and making follow-up phone calls. After we collect the data, it is shared with our Board to refine the key strategies outlined in our five-year strategic plan.

Much of the Black population in California experiences pervasive systematic disadvantages that frequently impede their educational progress. These include: low-quality schools found in predominately low-income and Black communities, a poverty rate that is three times that of Whites in California because 55 percent of all black children live in single-parent homes, and an unemployment rate that is double that of whites. Education has the power to transform this narrative. Significant research has demonstrated that bachelor's degree holders are more likely to be employed, less likely to rely on social services, less likely to be incarcerated, and more likely to have children who will also early bachelor's degrees. So far, in the past seven years of collecting data, our data shows that 99.9% of all our tour participants enroll in college. Our one outlier is a foster youth who chose to go into the military. We have the power to address the challenges facing African Americans attempting to earn a four-year degree. What's next is that our organization, which is 31 years strong, will continue doing what we do best--postiviely impacting a student's access to an educational opportunity that will improve their overall quality of life. As we all know education is the way out of poverty.

Financials

Educational Student Tours Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Educational Student Tours Inc

Board of directors
as of 5/28/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Celeste Wall

Dr. Charlotte Forte-Parnell

Retired administrator/Antelope Valley College

Dr. Mitchell Hamilton

Professor of Marketing/Loyola-Maymount University

Dr. Lance Robert

Professor of Political Science/ Los Angeles Southwest College

Cynthia Barnett

Retired Professor of Sociology/Moorpark College

Chinyarai Hamilton

homemaker

Dr. Yasmin Delahoussaye

Retired college president/Los Angeles Southwest College

Gregory Delahoussaye

President/CEO of Educational Student Tours

Celeste Wall

Board Chair/Educational Student Tours

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Keywords

low-income and foster youth