A Place Called Home

Changing the world starts at Home.

aka APCH   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  www.apch.org

Mission

A Place Called Home provides a safe, nurturing environment with proven programs in arts, education and wellness for the young people in South Central Los Angeles to help them improve their economic conditions and develop healthy, fulfilling and purposeful lives.

Ruling year info

1993

Chief Executive Officer

Norayma Cabot

Main address

2830 South Central Avenue

Los Angeles, CA 90011 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-4427291

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Nonmonetary Support N.E.C. (A19)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Based in Los Angeles City Council District 9, we serve the most impoverished district in the city with an acute need for comprehensive services. Most APCH members (79%) share the Center’s 90011 zip code, where 40% of residents age 25 and older have less than a ninth grade education. Of member families who report their income, 87% live at or below the federal poverty line, currently $25,750 for a family of four (2019 US Dept. of Health & Human Services).

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Educational Services

APCH Educational Services program improves students' academic performance and social skills, offering academic tutoring as well as classes in literacy, math, and science.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups

The Health, Nutrition & Well-Being program provides nutritious meals, gardening and cooking classes, free mental health services for members and their families, and free dental and health services through collaborations with local healthcare providers. The program also includes an athletics division that offers youth an opportunity to participate in league sports and daily fitness classes.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups

The Community Engagement & Volunteerism program is designed to enfranchise parents, family and community members in the agency’s mission and operation so we can all work together to support the youth as they progress toward healthy, fulfilled and productive lives. We welcome over 2,000 volunteers annually and distribute more than $1 million worth of vital goods, including food, school supplies, and clothing, to our community.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups

APCH's Teen & Young Adult Services program supports educational and vocational achievement among teen members through college and career guidance, college preparation and scholarship assistance, mentoring, life skills development, and more. It also includes an innovative high school degree program called RISE at APCH, offered in partnership with Da Vinci Schools.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Ethnic and racial groups

Arts & Creative Expression offers digital media, dance, music, theater and art programs to members, which is particularly important as budget restrictions minimize enrichment and creative skills training for students in schools.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Awards

Top-Rated Nonprofit 2014

Great Nonprofits

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

A Place Called Home (APCH) provides a safe, nurturing environment with proven programs in arts, education and wellness for the young people in South Central Los Angeles to help them improve their economic conditions and develop healthy, fulfilling and purposeful lives. They are: (1) to increase the likelihood that members will remain in school, graduate, and go on to pursue higher learning and/or meaningful employment; (2) to increase each member's capacity for positive, non-prejudicial and nonviolent interaction with peers, teachers, adults, family and community members; (3) to reduce members' involvement or likelihood to be involved in criminal behavior or gang activity; and (4) to empower members and inspire them to take ownership of their lives and to make a positive difference in their communities and in the world.

While these objectives are relatively broad, APCH's comprehensive menu of programs has a unique capacity to realize the underlying goals, and because of that menu, we are able to attract a large number of youth on a daily, monthly, and yearly basis. Moreover, because APCH welcomes youth as young as eight years old, we have the advantage of time. We can help a younger member and his/her family take full advantage of all of our programs and services, and through, for example, the free, comprehensive mental health counseling services that we provide to individual members and their families, we can address challenges early on, thereby helping youth acquire the psycho-social tools they need to take full advantage of the programs offered to older members.

Our programs are designed to sequentially support self-empowerment, self-sufficiency, build resiliency, inspire discovery, and encourage scholastic achievement and life skills development from age eight to mid-20’s, an approach we call “Bridge to the Future.”

APCH has five core areas of activity: 1) Teen & Young Adult Services provide vocational support, career and college advisement, scholarships, mentoring and life skills classes to support the transition to adulthood. This department also encompasses RISE High School at APCH, an on-site charter school in partnership with Da Vinci Schools, which serves vulnerable and disenfranchised youth including those in foster care, experiencing homelessness or transitioning from institutional life; 2) Educational Services features intensive academic support and tutoring for members in elementary school through high school, as well as programs that encourage good scholastic habits and a love of learning; 3) Health, Nutrition & Well-Being comprises athletics, nutrition, counseling services, and family support programs including health clinics, case management, and resource referrals; 4) Arts & Creative Expression includes robust programs and professional instruction in digital media, filmmaking, dance, music, fine arts and theater, filling a gap left by underfunded schools and allowing APCH members to discover and express their voice; and 5) Community Engagement & Volunteerism features volunteer and community-focused activities, as well as growing new programs in civic engagement and social entrepreneurship.

APCH's leadership, the Center's large cadre of volunteers, 80+ personnel and strong connections with other community organizations and businesses make fulfilling program initiatives a successful process. Our partnerships with Los Angeles Trade Tech and CD Tech, for example, help teens and parents acquire skills to overcome challenges that result in unemployment and low educational attainment. The Executive Director reports directly to the Board of Directors, whose members volunteer their services and resources. The Board meets four times annually, while its six committees each have their own, needs-based schedules of meetings. The Center benefits from the annual involvement of over 2,000 volunteers, who collectively donate a yearly average of about 23,000 hours.

APCH was founded in 1993 when real estate professional Debrah Constance dedicated herself to providing gang-affected youth in South Central Los Angeles with a safe place after school to get a snack, do homework, play with friends, and be with caring adults. On the first day of the agency's existence 12 kids showed up to the basement of a church, agreeing to follow some basic rules: no weapons, drugs, graffiti or gang signs. Three years later, 400 children and youth were regular members of APCH and we moved to our present location on South Central Avenue.

Now under the leadership of Executive Director Jonathan Zeichner since 2009, and in our third decade serving youth in South Los Angeles, APCH has established a vital and nurturing presence in our neighborhood. More than 20,000 young people and their families have crossed our threshold in the past 25 years. APCH currently serves an average of 11,000 South Central residents each year, including 1,000 unduplicated members (ages 8 to mid-twenties) and their families, through our core programs, distributions and cultural events. We currently have a membership waiting list of 700. For the past five years, APCH's semester-to-semester retention rate has averaged above 90%, allowing us to make a lasting and meaningful impact in the lives of our members and families as they participate year after year. We have sent over 450 youth to college since 2002 through the APCH Shaheen Scholarship program and are currently supporting 87 APCH Shaheen Scholars in colleges and universities across the country.

In December 2016 APCH realized a significant milestone with the opening of “The Bridge," a teen center and multidisciplinary arts building across the street from our original campus. The combined Center now has 35,000 square feet of program space and includes an athletic field, commercial kitchen, garden, dance studio, recording studio, art studio, gallery, and theater. In 2018 APCH received its 7th consecutive 4-star rating from Charity Navigator, an accomplishment achieved by just 5% of the organizations they rate nationally, indicating the highest levels of fiscal management, transparency, and accountability.

In August 2017 we launched “RISE at APCH," an accredited charter high school education partnership with Da Vinci Schools. With its unique focus on enrolling foster and homeless youth between the ages of 16 and 21, who are neither working or in school, our RISE at APCH partnership is a pilot program that is breaking new ground to provide full academic and wraparound services for the most vulnerable youth in Los Angeles.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    A Place Called Home (APCH) is based in South Central Los Angeles where only 26% of residents 25 years or older have a high school diploma. Our community of members is 95% Latinx, and 87% of enrolled families report living at or below the federal poverty line. APCH’s ability to serve this community effectively is rooted in our long-lasting relationships and the high level of trust that we have cultivated with local families.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    During the pandemic, APCH conducted a family needs survey of our constituents revealing that 76% of families reported the loss of a job or work hours since COVID-19; 58% of families have fallen behind on rent, and 62% have fallen behind on their utility bills; and 64% of families struggle to afford groceries for their families. In response to these pressures, APCH launched a basic needs initiative to provide groceries to families experiencing food insecurity and to provide direct cash assistance for rent and utilities to help prevent displacement for familes who may be challenged in accessing conventional public support.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    APCH uses multiple avenues for collecting feedback from our constituents, which include survey tools as well as an annual stakeholder convening (conducted virtually in 2020 and 2021). These feedback loops have helped APCH remain responsive to emerging and evolving needs in the community to ensure that our programs are always relevant, accessible and tailored to our community. Direct feedback has prompted us to create and launch new programs, like programs for parents and guardians and new peer groups for youth focused on mental health.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

A Place Called Home
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

A Place Called Home

Board of directors
as of 09/28/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Gareth Schweitzer

Sister Patricia Connor, RSHM

RSHM Provincial Center

Howard Sherwood

Daniel's Jewelers

Louise Hamagami

Marshall Wax

Robert Israel

Angel Investors

Stephanie Sherwood

Maryellen Zarakas

Warner Bros.

Melissa Palazzo-Hart

Ant Farm

Hamed Tavajohi

Bank of the West

Barbara Glazer

Picture Head

Dawn Campbell

Herbalife Ltd.

Gareth Schweitzer

Susan Napier

Goldman Sachs

Michelle Kouyate

Film Producer

Michael Converse

AECOM

Kathryn Converse

Writer, Director

Vera Stewart

Bank of America

Sharon Hauptman

American Business Bank

Jacqueline Jimenez

Pantaya, LLC

Tom McCabe

DBS Bank

Edgar Morales

Ethan Smith

Treehouse Co-Living, LLC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/28/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data