GOLD2023

After-School All-Stars

Los Angeles, CA   |  http://www.afterschoolallstars.org

Learn how to support this organization

Mission

After-School All-Stars (ASAS) provides comprehensive after-school programs that keep children safe and help them succeed in school and in life.

Ruling year info

1993

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Ben Paul

President

Andrea Bazán

Main address

6420 Wilshire Blvd Suite 1250

Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Inner City Games Foundation

EIN

95-4441208

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Other Recreation, Sports, or Leisure Activities N.E.C. (N99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2019.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The mission of After-School All-Stars (ASAS) is to provide free, comprehensive after-school programs that keep children safe and help them succeed in school and life. We serve more than 90,000 youth at 460 schools across 19 chapters nationwide with an emphasis on the middle grades (6 – 8). Of the students we serve, 91% are youth of color, and 85% qualify for the Federal Free and Reduced Meal Program, an indicator of household poverty. ASAS provides chronically underserved students with academic and enrichment programs that promote racial equity and help counteract widening opportunity and achievement gaps.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Academic Readiness

Academic Readiness programs give our students the support and homework help they need to build positive academic behaviors at school that can lead to success in high school and college.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Health and Wellness programs encourage healthy habits like daily exercise, healthy eating, and social-emotional development by offering experiences in athletics, fresh food preparation and mindfulness.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Career Exploration programs expose our students to career pathways and industry mentors. Students develop strategies for realizing career and education goals, while building hard and soft skills.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Project-based learning experiences in STEM teach students valuable life skills including collaboration, communication, problem-solving, and creativity.

Population(s) Served

Visual and Performing Arts programs build confidence, encourage self-expression, and develop technical and leadership skills. Arts programs include many courses that have been cut from traditional school programming.

Population(s) Served

ASAS weaves SEL into all our programming, helping youth make positive decisions, foster a growth mindset, and develop skills and behaviors for leadership, resilience, empathy, and more. We aim to provide training and content that engages families directly in their immediate physical, mental, emotional, and academic situations.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Children and youth
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Humanitarian Action & Services - Corporate Social Responsibility 2022

Webby/Anthem Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percent of students who participated in Academic Readiness programming who expressed high academic self-efficacy, believing they can do well in school.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of times per week that Health & Wellness participants engage in 30 minutes of physical activity

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percent of students who participated in career exploration who said they know what education or experience are necessary for careers they are interested in.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of emergency meals provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

As a response to the COVID-19 crisis in 2020, ASAS provided emergency food and supplies to over 84,000 students and families.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goals for our All-Stars are that they grow up safe and healthy, graduate from high school and go to college, find careers they love, and give back to their communities. To reach the students in greatest need, ASAS focuses exclusively on youth from under-resourced schools and communities. ASAS is working to reinvent what after-school time looks like for our students. Their schools offer limited opportunities for the diverse enrichment and experiential learning opportunities that power creative thinking and build social-emotional skills. Such schools often struggle to offer students consistent access to necessary supports, including academic interventions, counseling, and family educational resources. Through our holistic approaches to extended-day learning, ASAS helps fill this gap and enhance underserved students’ opportunities to grow and thrive.

To best serve our youth, ASAS uses a comprehensive approach that expands access to and improves the quality of educational experiences in five key areas: Health & Wellness; Academic Readiness; Career Exploration; STEM; and Visual & Performing Arts. We are strategic in our focus on out-of-school programming for middle school youth. Extensive research demonstrates that both the middle-school years and the after-school hours represent crucial windows in which youth engage in activities that will shape their futures.

Unfortunately, such opportunities are not distributed equitably, and are often least accessible to those youth who need them most. “From Risk to Opportunity: Afterschool Programs Keep Kids Safe When Juvenile Crime Peaks,” a study published in October 2019 by the Council for a Strong America in partnership with Fight Crime: Invest in Kids, reports that “afterschool programming is unavailable for over 19 million children, more than half of whom are low-income, whose parents would enroll them if an afterschool program was available.” Such disparities in academic opportunity are closely related to other social inequalities that influence each other and impact the youth we serve, who regularly face many challenges and stressors that rarely if ever affect the lives of their more privileged peers. The COVID-19 pandemic has magnified these challenges by further restricting the already limited access underserved youth have to such opportunities and exacerbating educational, financial, justice, and health inequalities rooted in structural racism and systemic poverty.

For these reasons, and in order to reach those students in greatest need, ASAS focuses exclusively on youth from underserved schools and communities. At a time when our students need these programs more than ever, we provide them with more than just enrichment programs that keep them engaged: we help fill the achievement gap and help youth develop lifelong skills that transform the way they see themselves and their ability to impact the world.

ASAS' highly collaborative, school-based program model is unique because it allows programs to be adapted to the needs of each school with which we partner. Through our school relationships and conversations with principals and other administrators, we are better able to understand and respond to student needs. In addition to tailoring our curriculum to individual schools, we have been able to build relationships between our schools and ASAS program partners who provide innovative curricula, from STEM programs to performing arts.

ASAS is committed to the continued financial health and vitality of our programs. We work toward long-term sustainability through continually cultivating a diverse pool of strategically aligned donors and by building a group of core, sustaining partners, with a focus on securing multi-year commitments. The ASAS National Development and Operations teams have staff dedicated solely to grants managements and administration. They have expertise in finance, including the accounting and management of restricted funding, programmatic requirements associated with public and private grant funding, and grant reporting. Our national team supports our local chapters with fundraising development, marketing, operations, and strategic leadership to ensure that each chapter has the capacity to grow and execute strong programming.

Traditionally, we have offered programs in person at school sites. When schools closed in March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we pivoted to a more community-focused model and began offering virtual programs. To meet students’ needs in the pandemic-informed learning environment of the 2020-21 academic year, we continue to offer virtual programming in all chapters, including in Los Angeles, though we also offer in-person and hybrid options in locations where it is safe and feasible to do so. We have developed safety plans for in-person programming. We will use Virtual Learning to help bridge the transition to in-person programs, and we anticipate preserving some level of Virtual Learning even after we fully resume our core school-based programming.

By providing diverse, high-quality enrichment for youth from underserved communities, ASAS aims to break cycles of inequality. We have responded to the COVID-19 health crisis—and related financial, educational, and justice crises rooted in systemic racism—by adapting our model to address current realities, meet urgent needs, and engage more deeply with families and communities. Guided by the belief that social-emotional skills and antiracist practices are inseparable, we have structured our programs with the goal of helping heal our students and empower them to share their experiences, perspectives, and stories. We expect this work to yield positive impact on the individual and community levels.

To this end, we continue to provide safe spaces and incorporate SEL and restorative practice with program content. We are elevating youth voices and providing students with the tools and platforms for youth-led social justice storytelling. Major events such as All-Star Leadership University, our annual youth leadership gathering, and All-Star Academies, our new model of intensive, discipline-focused skill-building courses and convenings piloted with our successful Songwriting Academy, provide high-profile platforms for youth voices and empower underserved students to express their feelings, stories, perspectives, and ideas about justice.

ASAS expects to meet the following objectives and outcomes through our comprehensive programming:

Objective 1: Students will be academically engaged with high self-confidence
o Outcome: 70% of regular participants in our Academic Readiness programming will demonstrate high levels of academic confidence, believing they can do well in school even if it is challenging

Objective 2: Students will engage in regular moderate to vigorous physical activity
o Outcome: 70% of regular participants in our Health & Wellness programming will report having exercised at least three days per week

Objective 3: Students will develop career pathway confidence
o Outcome: 70% of regular participants in our Career Exploration programming will report having confidence in their ability to understand and navigate various career pathways

Objective 4: Students will develop their personal voices as an essential component of youth development
o Outcome: 80% of regular participants in our programming will report feeling empowered to share their thoughts, ideas, and feelings

Objective 5: Students will enhance their social-emotional health and have a greater chance to thrive
o Outcome: 70% of regular participants in our programming will report having confidence in their ability to cope with adversity and manage emotions

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

After-School All-Stars
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

After-School All-Stars

Board of directors
as of 11/01/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Paul Wachter

Main Street Advisors

Joseph Schlater

Jane Macon

Daniel Hernandez

Brett Brewer

Maverick Carter

Tom Werner

Arnold Schwarzenegger

Ben Paul

Laura DiMaggio

Scott Galer

Annie Duke

Omar Johnson

Michael Reinsdorf

John Simonian

John Tighe

Michael Beckerman

Tim Hepplewhite

Conyers Davis

John F. Ghingo

Keith Barish

Marjorie Harris

Priscilla Hernandez

Matthew Pritzker

Andy Heyward

Mark Madgett

Kendall Holbrook

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/30/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Jewish
Gender identity
Male

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/22/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.