The Mr. Holland's Opus Foundation

Keeping Music Alive In Our Schools

aka MHOF   |   Studio City, CA   |  www.mhopus.org

Mission

The Mr. Holland’s Opus Foundation keeps music alive in our schools by providing vital support services to school districts, and new musical instruments to underfunded music programs nationwide, giving under-represented youth access to the many benefits of music education, leading them to success in school, and inspiring creativity and expression through playing music.

Ruling year info

1997

President and CEO

Ms. Felice Mancini

Main address

4370 Tujunga Avenue Suite 110

Studio City, CA 91604 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-4604927

NTEE code info

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

Nonmonetary Support N.E.C. (O19)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (T12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

MHOF's core program addresses a very common and endemic need in under-resourced schools that offer music to their students. In a survey of 100 school districts that MHOF has served over the years, their number one request was for instruments and supplies. With increasing enrollment and aging of current inventories, their budgets just can't cover this expense. We step in to determine greatest needs and help sustain their programs. We increase access to a life-changing opportunity for kids whose parents can't afford to rent or purchase an instrument for their child.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

School instrument donation

Schools in low-income communities are invited to apply for the instruments they need to give access to more students whose parents can't afford to rent or buy an instrument for their child. We increase the school's inventory of quality instruments and replace old, unusable instruments to give kids a better experience playing music in school, increasing their enjoyment, engagement and learning.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children
Preteens
Economically disadvantaged people
Students

Music Education District Support Services, MEDSS®️, a data-rich targeted and detailed assessments of arts and music programs in school districts. MEDSS assesses, campus by campus, music program enrollment, program access, ethnicity, retention, special education and ELL participation, scheduling, instrument inventory and condition, free/reduced lunch population, class offerings, and more. The data is compared districtwide to show inequities and inconsistencies in music programming that most affect students throughout their K-12 education experience. Key findings are shared along with recommendations for improvement, leading to greater access and quality programming.

Population(s) Served
Students
Teachers

Where we work

Awards

Arts Education Award 2016

Americans for the Arts

Affiliations & memberships

NAMM (National Association of Music Merchandisers)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of schools that received instrument donations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Preteens, Low-income people

Related Program

School instrument donation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of instruments donated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Preteens, Low-income people

Related Program

School instrument donation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total value of donated instruments

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Preteens, Low-income people

Related Program

School instrument donation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The immediate goal is to provide enough instruments to the music program to eliminate sharing and wait lists, replace instruments in the school's inventory that are beyond repair or able to be used, eliminate borrowing instruments from other schools and to increase the number of youngsters who can participate in music. Long-term goals are to strengthen the music program, raise awareness of the importance for music education in the school and in the community and renew the school and the district's commitment to music education and secure its place for the future. We hope to remove the barriers to access that low-income families face when they can't afford to rent or purchase instruments for their children, and school instruments are the only option - often in very short supply and aged beyond repair.

Our strategy is to give each school the tools they need to provide a quality music education to their students. This will:

a. Increase the number of students who can participate in music by allowing those who are on waiting lists or who cannot afford to rent or buy an instrument a chance to play, free of charge
b. Replace instruments in the school's inventory that are no longer playable or able to be used by students
c. Eliminate sharing of instruments to enhance the quality of the students' music education
d. Eliminate borrowing instruments from other schools that are loaned temporarily so that the awarded school has its own reliable inventory to sustain and grow the program
e. Raise awareness of the music program to motivate, inspire and encourage the total student body to participate
f. Renew the school and the school district's commitment to their music program with a sizable and public investment in the program

In addition, we provide much-needed support services to school districts that show a strong commitment to music education, but don't have time, resources or knowledge to address common challenges. We help identify areas where we can help them sustain their music programs.

Our core program addresses the needs of students from low-income communities attending Title 1 schools throughout the country. With 20 years of experience and understanding the issues and challenges facing school districts attempting to provide quality and sustainable music education for all students, MHOF can contribute much more than instruments to their programs. Even more valuable and welcomed is the range of services we also provide – such as more efficient inventory controls, assessment of music offerings district-wide, feeder pattern identification, speaking at school board meetings to promote further support, and holding community instrument drives. Many school districts are hungry for this kind of help.

Since 1996, we have donated over 28,000 instruments to 1,531 school music programs, effectively serving 2+ million students over the life of the instruments.

In October 2016, Americans for the Arts honored the foundation with their national Arts Education Award for two decades of service to music education.

We have accomplished, through our donors' generosity, a huge amount for many schools and many students, but the work continues and the demand increases. We want to accomplish more for more kids as long as we can, and as long as those who share the values and passion for music education continue to support our efforts.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Students attending Title 1 public schools, music and arts school district leaders nationwide.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Twice monthly video calls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    With Covid and resulting issues of remote learning, MHOF instituted twice-monthly calls to arts supervisors to gather and share resources and information, with the goal of how to best serve students during the pandemic.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has cemented relationships with all partners and constituents, positively affecting communications and trust.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Feedback from teachers is sometimes slow and follow up is often needed. They have a lot to do.,

Financials

The Mr. Holland's Opus Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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The Mr. Holland's Opus Foundation

Board of directors
as of 08/03/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Scott Holtzman

Disney

Term: 2021 - 2023


Board co-chair

Doreen Ringer Ross

Scott Holtzman

Doreen Ringer Ross

Bob Ezrin

Robert Cort

Mark Rapaport

Jon Kamen

@radical.media

Paula Silver

Beyond the Box

Pam Healey

Spoke Studios

Christopher Lennertz

David Greene

Productive Solutions LLC

Marty Albertson

Megan Jones

Gwen Riley

Peloton

Robin Burgess

Burgess Management

Akshay Khanna

Jackpot.com

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/3/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/03/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.