PUBLIC HEALTH ADVOCATES

Davis, CA   |  https://phadvocates.org/

Mission

Public Health Advocates works with communities to promote policies, systems, and norms that foster health and social justice.

Ruling year info

2000

Principal Officer

Dr. Harold Goldstein

Main address

PO Box 2309

Davis, CA 95617 USA

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Formerly known as

California Center for Public Health Advocates

EIN

95-4723901

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

Public Health Program (E70)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (W05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Healthy Eating Active Living (HEAL) Cities Campaign

CCities play a vital role in the health of their communities. For more than a decade, Public Health Advocates has partnered with the League of California Cities to harness the power of local government to advance health equity by promoting healthy eating and physical activity. With financial support from Kaiser Permanente and others, we have helped more than 200 cities establish over 700 health-promoting local policies.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Public Health Advocates partners with top academic institutions to conduct epidemiological research and develop compelling data-based descriptions of the health and social problems we are addressing. We commonly describe findings by city, county, and legislative district to make them as meaningful as possible to makers and the media.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Together with likeminded partners, Public Health Advocates sponsors and supports legislation that fosters health equity, promotes social justice, and expands opportunity for communities facing the greatest barriers to wellbeing. Our current statewide California efforts focus on restorative justice and criminal justice reform, food access, diabetes and sugary drinks, homelessness, marijuana equity, and childhood trauma. Our lobbying efforts are funded through donations of unrestricted funds.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Public parks support physical and emotional health, promote social cohesion, bolster local economies, and make neighborhoods more attractive places to live, work, and play. Funded by The California Endowment, the California Wellness Foundation, and the Gilbert Foundation, Public Health Advocates is partnering with KDI to help low-income cities to get California Prop 68 park bond grants so they can build new parks or expand/renovate existing ones in impoverished, park-poor neighborhoods.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Adults

Racism and other forms of structural oppression have a direct impact on individual and community wellbeing. Through our Stockton Faces of Resilience project supported by the Sierra Health Foundation and Kaiser Permanente, Public Health Advocates is training youth organizers to advocate for school district policies that prohibit racial discrimination, expand restorative justice practices, and promote mental health.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children and youth

With 16 teaspoons of sugar per 20-ounce bottle, sodas and other sugary drinks are leading contributors to obesity and diabetes. Kick the Can is a groundbreaking California campaign to “give the boot” to sugary drinks by educating the public and policy makers about the harmful impact of these beverages, and working with communities to establish state and local laws regulating the beverage industry’s sale and promotion of sugar-laden products.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is helping selected underserved communities across the country to identify and promote Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH). Our CDC-funded REACH project partners with African American churches and community based organizations in Stockton to increase opportunities for physical activity, expand access to healthy food and beverages, and prevent and address childhood trauma.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups

Today’s urgent and costly health and social problems—homelessness, violence, addiction, depression, and chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes—are often rooted in childhood trauma and toxic stress. All Children Thrive is an equity-focused, city-based, community-driven initiative to prevent adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and foster individual and community healing and resilience. The campaign, a partnership with UCLA, is funded by the State of California.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where you live shouldn’t determine how long you live—yet it often does. As part of The California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities initiative to transform communities devastated by health inequities, Public Health Advocates helps students and parents in Boyle Heights (Los Angeles County) advocate for clean water, a comprehensive wellness center, and restorative justice at Roosevelt High School. These efforts have led to important districtwide school policy change.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Despite legal protections, transgender Californians experience some of the most extreme health and mental health disparities. Through California TRANScends, Public Health Advocates is helping to enhance the capacity of established and emerging transgender-led community organizations to win and sustain state and local policies promoting transgender health equity in California.

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since its inception in 1999, Public Health Advocates has worked to influence the ways in states and communities tackle the nation's most serious public health problem: the twin epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Our work is focused on transforming the ways in which public policies and organizational practices inform the eating and physical activity behaviors that shape our health.

Our work employs five core strategies:
• Research: We conduct research that describes the systemic causes and the human toll of the obesity and diabetes epidemics.
• Policymaker Education: We provide technical assistance to help decision makers develop sound nutrition and physical activity policies.
• Community Mobilization: We train and organize youth, adult residents and organizational leaders, particularly those from low income communities and communities of color, to raise their voice on nutrition and physical activity issues.
• Media Advocacy: We use the media to tell the obesity and diabetes story, and to re-enforce the need for policy change.
• Partnership Building: We build a broad-based constituency for policy reform by building partnerships across the country with state and local policy makers, funders, and leaders from diverse communities.

We bring over 20 years of successful policy change experience to the projects we undertake. Our diverse staff are experts in a variety of fields including community organizing, research, policy-development, grass roots and state-level lobbying and communications. We have strong fiscal and governance policies which enable us to successfully manage both small and large financial gifts and grants.

“Due to the rapid rise in obesity, today's youth may – for the first time in modern history – live shorter lives than their parents.

This statement, published a decade ago, continues to be a compass point for the HEAL Cities Campaign. While public health advocates may be overly familiar with this prediction, city officials around the country consistently express alarm and disbelief when they hear it. Newer data describing the rise of adolescent diabetes and pre-diabetes over the past 20 years – once 9% and now 24% - evokes equally strong alarm among local policymakers, and stimulates their urgency to make change.

Obesity, overweight and physical inactivity continue to plague American cities and generate billions of dollars of medical expenditures by public and private health care systems, individuals and families. Their causes are complex and include the proliferation of food deserts - a total lack of healthy food - and food swamps –an overwhelming supply of unhealthy food. Their causes also include neighborhoods lacking safe places to play, walk and bike. These environments where the majority of US residents live, work, play and pray took decades to build and will take substantial time to reform.

While PHAdvocates has had a meaning impact across the state and nation, there is still much to do to deepen the work and expand our work so that it effectively, equitably and sustainably builds a greater number of healthier communities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

PUBLIC HEALTH ADVOCATES
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

PUBLIC HEALTH ADVOCATES

Board of directors
as of 9/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Elisa Odabashian

Retired Consumer Advocate


Board co-chair

Harold Dela Cruz

Innovate Public Schools

Joe Wilkins, MBA, FACHE

TRG Healthcare

Andrea Resnick, JD, MS

Kaiser Permanente Hospitals

Harold Goldstein, DrPH

Public Health Advocates

Mariana Sabeniano, MS

Chief of Staff, Assemblymember Monique Limon

Nicole Vick, MPH, CHES

Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/17/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data