PLATINUM2023

HEADINGTON INSTITUTE

Pasadena, CA   |  www.headington-institute.org

Mission

To be the most innovative and trusted partner for organizations with staff working in high-stress environments across the globe to help them both maintain their well-being and thrive in their work.

Ruling year info

2002

Chief Executive Officer

Dr. Diane Flannery

Main address

402 South Marengo Avenue

Pasadena, CA 91101 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-4839511

NTEE code info

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Every year, the world grows more dangerous for first responders worldwide. This is true for humanitarians operating in places like Syria or Iraq, but equally true for domestic first responders responding to natural disasters and crises at home. Across sectors, fire-fighters, law enforcement personnel and humanitarian staff operate under an increasing threat of intentional violence. They set aside personal grief in order to assist others at great personal cost. As large scale emergencies increase, there will be a growing need to ensure these individuals have what they need to continue in their work and remain resilient.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Global Humanitarian Workers

The Headington Institute partners with aid and emergency response organizations working worldwide to provide support to their personnel. Our focus is three-fold: providing counseling, training and education, and organizational consultation.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Resilient Responder Program builds the capacity of local disaster and community responders to function at their best during critical incidents and recover sufficiently afterwards. By promoting personal, family, team, and organizational resilience, this program helps everyone be better prepared for future critical incidents. In-person training workshops, management consultations, online resources, and self-assessment tools provide local responders with useful information and techniques based on the latest research findings and international field experience.

Population(s) Served
Emergency responders
Adults

Homeless shelter staff serve on the front lines of domestic humanitarian aid addressing the needs of the homeless, disabled, chemically addicted, and hungry in cities across the USA. In the midst of challenging environments, these personnel engage with those impacted by emergencies, violence, poverty and disaster. In order to effectively address the ongoing spiritual and physical needs of these communities, it is critical that these staff maintain their own mental, physical, and spiritual wellbeing.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of members from priority population attending training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Emergency responders

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These numbers represent persons who attended an in-person training with a Headington staff psychologist. As of FY2019 this includes those who attended virtual trainings due to pandemic disruption.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Emergency responders

Related Program

Global Humanitarian Workers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The average number of persons that attend an in-person or webinar training. Numbers are calculated according to the fiscal year beginning July 1.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Emergency responders

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number of organizations that have official partnerships to bring Headington resources to their employees. Numbers are calculated according to the fiscal year beginning July 1.

Number of therapy hours provided to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Emergency responders

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of individual therapy hours conducted from the home office (not while deployed) in a calendar year. Numbers are calculated according to the fiscal year beginning July 1.

Number of downloads of the organization's materials and explanations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Emergency responders

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These represent total numbers of downloads of our resources and support materials which constitute a free library for those wanting to understand and practice resilience.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

By providing counseling, training, consultation, online resources, and programmatic research, the Headington Institute promotes the physical hardiness, emotional resilience, and spiritual vitality of humanitarian relief and emergency response personnel. One day, all humanitarian workers will have the personal skills, social support, organizational resources, and public interest needed to maintain their wellbeing and thrive in their work.

DIRECTIONAL GOAL: We will help more people and increase our impact by expanding our services • Provide scalable services and products to humanitarian aid workers and emergency responders. • Increase number of week-long security trainings and one-day risk psychology workshops • Expand emergency responder program to major cities across the country and worldwide • Provide more low and no-cost services for those unable to pay full fee • Provide data, services, and resources for aid worker victims of sexual assault • Develop new research-based workshops & online resources to promote resilience and personal spirituality

With ten licensed doctoral clinical psychologists, one researcher, and two administrative professionals, HI is the largest nonprofit provider of psychological care to humanitarian agencies in the world. The institute has provided services to thousands of relief and development workers from more than 100 organizations in the past decade. An additional 20,000 individuals access free online resources through HI's website, blog, Facebook page, YouTube Channel, and mobile app each month. The institute was featured on NBC News-LA and mentioned in The Chronicle for Philanthropy, National Geographic, Associated Press, and the Pasadena Star News. The HI accomplishes its mission through the following programs: • Training workshops: HI has developed a curriculum to promote personal resilience and trauma recovery based on clinical practice and brain research. Teams travel worldwide at the request of aid organizations. • Counseling: Each team includes an experienced clinical psychologist available for individual and group sessions onsite. By using translators and local care providers, we assist local national workers with no other means of psychological support. Our psychologists also provide confidential consultations remotely by phone, SKYPE, email, and text messaging to aid workers worldwide. For many, this is a vital lifeline of sanity and comfort in the midst of a chaotic deployment. • Organizational consultation: HI provides management training, executive coaching, and professional development opportunities. We offer training in cross-cultural communications, conflict resolution, and team building. H.R. professionals are given specialized instruction in the assessment of employee resilience and risk, management of crises and critical incidents, and evaluation of employee dangerousness. HI also conducts staff wellbeing assessments and program outcome studies. • Special Projects: With the help of generous donors, HI has offered extended pro bono services to local national humanitarian workers in Indonesia, Cambodia, Kenya, and Haiti. This enables us to assist those doing the most dangerous and difficult humanitarian worker (i.e., body recovery, famine relief, hostage rescue, etc.). • Programmatic research: A team of neuropsychologists and doctoral students conduct ongoing research on the resilience of humanitarian workers. The team has developed the Headington Institute Resilience Inventory, the first test of its kind, to identify factors that promote or undermine wellbeing. We continually revise our assessment and treatment protocols based on our research findings, to maximize our effectiveness. • Online resources: Free training resources, in a variety of languages, are available on the HI website, blog, YouTube Channel, Facebook page, and mobile app. Humanitarian workers worldwide use our free resources, based on more than a decade of research and field experience, to find help and support.

Since inception in 2001, we have led the field in promoting the personal resilience and trauma recovery of humanitarian relief and development personnel worldwide. By combining competent clinical work, effective training workshops, insightful organizational consultation, helpful online resources, and cutting edge programmatic research, we offer a seamless array of support services that influences the humanitarian community in significant ways. We are widely regarded as “the best in the business" for reasons that include: • All of our clinicians are licensed doctoral level clinical psychologists, most with more than 30 years of experience. • Our team includes two neuropsychologists who conduct brain research that informs our practice, policy, and programs. • We collaborate closely with Harvard, Yale, and Rockefeller University, as well as the Institute for Creative Technologies at the University of Southern California, providing direct access to cutting edge research and technology. • Our training workshops and online resources represent the latest scientific findings and advancements in theory and practice. • Many online resources are available in a variety of languages, and translators are used for in-person workshops and counseling when necessary. • All online resources and some clinical services are provided pro bono, enabling us to assist those most in need with no ability to pay. • We are familiar with nonsectarian, universally recognized personal spiritual practices that promote emotional resilience and trauma recovery. • Each staff member feels a deep, personal commitment to HI's mission and the people we serve. We do this work because we love it. That said, there is much more to be accomplished. Humanitarian aid workers deserve the very best psychological and spiritual support. We will not stop until they have it.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

HEADINGTON INSTITUTE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HEADINGTON INSTITUTE

Board of directors
as of 10/02/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Leah Porter

Capital Group Companies

Term: 2020 - 2024

Joan Riboli

San Antonio Winery

T. Christopher Martin

CEO, Direct Access Capital, LLC

Jock Ebner

Morlin Asset Management, LP

LuAnn Yocky

World Vision United States

Pamela Jo Fogg

Dowsett Fogg & Doler

Michelle Banks

President, African American Firefighters Museum

Leah Porter

Vice President Capital Group Companies

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/2/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data