Girls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara

Inspiring all girls to be strong, smart, and bold

aka Girls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara   |   Santa Barbara, CA   |  www.girlsincsb.org

Mission

Girls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara is a non-partisan organization with the mission of inspiring all girls to be strong, smart, and bold. Our vision is empowered girls in an equitable society. Girls Inc.'s comprehensive approach to whole-girl development equips girls to navigate systemic gender, economic, and social biases to grow up healthy, educated, and independent. Through direct-service, evidence-based out-of-school learning & enrichment programs and advocacy initiatives, girls develop the skills they need to become leaders in their communities and beyond. Girls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara is an affiliate of the Girls Inc. network in the U.S. and Canada.

Notes from the nonprofit

Please view our 2020 Annual Report at https://girlsincsb.org/2020-annual-report/. The Board of Directors adopted a Statement of Direction to formalize a short- to mid-term path toward organizational sustainability and to frame the priorities for the next CEO. The organization plans to embark on a formal long-term strategic planning process under the new CEO in 2022. The areas of priority include: - Invest in staff by focusing on culture, professional and leadership development, diversity, equity, and inclusion. - Develop relationships with community leaders and partner organizations to expand program delivery options within Santa Barbara County. - Advocate within the community on issues affecting girls and teens and be a trusted community resource and influencer. - Advance innovative fundraising opportunities; operate sustainably and with financial security. - Engage in a comprehensive strategic planning process.

Ruling year info

1959

Interim Executive Director and COO

Mr. Thomas Blabey

Main address

PO Box 236

Santa Barbara, CA 93102 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-6006417

NTEE code info

Girls Clubs (O22)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As a more than 150-year old national organization, Girls Inc. recognizes that while there has been some progress made toward gender equity to date, gender, racial, social, and economic biases continue to play a pivotal role in limiting girls’ potential for success and from leading healthy, educated, and independent lives. According to the Girls Inc. National Resource Center include: • 1 in 7 girls in the U.S. will not finish high school on time • 1 in 4 girls experiences sexual assault before the age of 18 • 7 in 10 girls are sexually harassed before they leave high school • 1 in 5 girls in the U.S. lives in poverty Additionally, the number of Hispanic youth in poverty (about 5.7 million in 2014) is higher than all other racial and ethnic groups of children. Youth who grow up poor are more likely to have delayed cognitive development; poorer school performance, socio-emotional development, and physical health; and to be economically poor as adults.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Economic Literacy

Girls learn to manage money, invest, and begin to develop an appreciation for global economics. Girls as young as six explore how the economy affects us locally and globally and develop skills needed to be economically independent.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

Girls develop skills to resist pressure to use harmful substances such as alcohol, tobacco, household chemicals, and other drugs. In this peer-education program, girls ages 11 to 14 learn healthy ways to manage stress and confront peer, media, and other pressures and then assume the roles of PEERsuaders for young girls. The program is available in Spanish as Persuasión Positiva.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

Girls build their leadership skills and create lasting social change through community action projects. In Discovery®, girls ages 9 to 11 celebrate the heritage of girls and women as leaders and develop awareness of themselves as community resources and trustees of the common good. In In Our Own Hands®, girls ages 12 to 14 deepen their understanding of girls and women as social change agents and of leadership as a collective process grounded in belonging to and having responsibility for one's community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

Girls increase their awareness of the scope and power of the media and the effects of media messages on girls and women. They learn to analyze critically what they see and hear in the media, advocate for change in entertainment, news, and advertising media, and create images that are more realistic and reflective of their lives.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

Girls develop enthusiasm for and skills in science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics (STEAM). Through hands-on activities, girls explore, ask questions, and solve problems. They also consider careers in these fields by interacting with women and men pursuing such careers.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

Girls acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to take charge of and to make informed, thoughtful decisions about their sexual health. Girls learn to identify ways and reasons to avoid early pregnancy and to prevent sexually transmitted infections, including HIV.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Women and girls

Girls learn skills and strategies to lead safer lives in their homes, in relationships, in their communities, and online. Girls learn specific self-defense techniques and how to seek out and talk to caring adults about personal violence. Older girls also take on a community action project to advocate for a safer world for all women and girls. Components of the program include Be BOLD.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

Girls learn to appreciate an active lifestyle as they develop movement and athletic skills, cooperative and competitive spirit, health awareness, and interest in sports and adventure. Girls also explore career opportunities related to sports and experience the benefits and excitement of taking healthy risks.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

In January of 2005, Girls Inc. implemented a national initiative to address the needs of Latinas aged 6 to 18, with the goal of increasing the number of Latina girls served by Girls Inc. affiliates and increasing the sensitivity to Latinas in all Girls Inc. efforts.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups

The Google Made with Code Initiative is inspiring millions of girls ages 12 to 18 to learn to code and to help them see coding as a means to pursue their dream careers. Girls Inc., a lead contributor to the Initiative, is committed to helping girls discover how science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and its many applications offer exciting opportunities today and for the future. Through our Google Made with Code Project, affiliates across the country are hosting Made with Code parties to introduce thousands of girls to coding, building upon programming in which girls explore STEM as part of their lives and potential career options. The parties provide a basic coding experience in an interactive and hands-on environment that girls also find fun and exciting.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Women and girls

The Girls Inc. Literacy Initiative strives to improve the literacy skills of girls in kindergarten through third grade (K-3) by promoting a love of reading and providing fun and engaging programming that supports the school-based instruction that girls receive.

The Literacy Initiative supports girls in building developmentally appropriate reading skills by the end of third grade so that they are equipped to succeed in school and participate more effectively in the Girls Inc. Experience. Further, girls develop enthusiasm for reading as a tool to learn about the world and become healthy, educated, and independent.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

Girls have the right to accept and appreciate their bodies, and are entitled to thrive in communities that invest in their total physical, mental, and emotional wellness. Girls need access to information, resources, and skills to be effective partners in promoting their own healthy development. To help ensure that girls have the support that they need to take charge of their own health, Girls Inc. has launched Girls Inc. Mind+Body℠, which focuses on four pillars that, according to research, play a major role in fortifying girls’ ability to develop and sustain strong minds and strong bodies. They are: nutrition, physical activity, stress management, and body image.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of girls participating in core program curriculum: 484

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Participating in our core after-school and summer enrichment programs and outreach programs. Does not include number of youth participating in Girls Inc.'s gymnastics programs.

Number of girls who benefit from further reduced program fees: 270

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Eligible girls and teens receiving additional program fee reductions.

Percentage of girls and teens from households earning $30,000 or less and living at or below the federal poverty level: 40%

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percentage of girls and teens in core programs identifying as non-white: 72%

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percentage of girls served in core programs ages of 9-11: 34%

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Core programs (does not include gymnastics)

Percentage of girls served in core programs ages of 12-18: 19%

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Core programs (does not include gymnastics)

Percentage of girls served in core programs ages of 5-8: 47%

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Core programs (does not include gymnastics)

Percentage of girls who feel safe at Girls Inc.: 98%

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Providing a consistently safe physical space for girls to go is critical to their well-being and mental health.

Percentage of Girls Inc. girls who know they will graduate high school: 96%

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Girls Inc. girls are future-minded and care about their academic performance as an important step in their path forward.

Percentage of girls who believe there is at least one trusted Girls Inc. adult they could go to for help with a problem: 93%

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Trusted mentors are a critical piece of The Girls Inc. Experience.

Percentage of Girls Inc. girls who think they are learning to make a difference in their community and in the world: 93%

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Girls are developing their leadership, advocacy, and problem-solving skills at Girls Inc.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Girls Inc. inspires all girls to be strong, smart, and bold to achieve its vision of empowered girls in an equitable society. The Girls Inc. experience consists of people (mentoring relationships), environment (all-girl, pro-girl, and physically and emotionally safe), and programs (evidence-based, developmentally appropriate), which together enable girls to succeed. The people are trained staff and volunteers, who build long-term, mentoring relationships in a safe and supportive environment. Our hands-on, minds-on educational and enrichment programs are guided by Girls Inc. National's core curriculum. Additionally, Girls Inc. exposes girls and teens to STEM fields where they learn about educational and career paths to professions in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math where women and women leaders are traditionally under-represented. Girls Inc. also helps girls learn to confidently advocate for themselves and for others.

Girls Inc. girls and teens are:
Strong (healthy) - They learn to be in charge of their health and possess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to develop and sustain healthy lifestyles. They are more likely than their peers nationally to appreciate their bodies, to avoid risky behaviors, and to stay on track to achieve positive life outcomes.
Smart (educated) - They are academically engaged, and connect academics to life experiences, opportunities, and careers. They defy national trends by setting high academic achievement goals and demonstrating interest in fields where women are traditionally underrepresented.
Bold (independent) - They are socially and emotionally intelligent and display character and confidence in the life skills that allow for independent, productive, and fulfilling lives. They learn to break through limiting barriers and gender stereotypes to become leaders for their generation.

Girls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara's curriculum is informed by Girls Inc. National Resource Center, and is constantly evaluated and updated to remain relevant to the needs of girls and teens in our community based on their input. All classes and activities are delivered by facilitators who are trained on the essential elements of strong, smart, and bold programming to achieve priority outcomes of girls.

Each program is evaluated for effectiveness using a systematic approach through student pre-and-post evaluation surveys, instructor evaluations, observations, and interviews. Results are reviewed prior to annual program implementation for relevant adjustments in curricula design and/or staff training needs. We also participate in the annual Girls Inc. National Strong, Smart, and Bold Outcome Survey (SSBOS), which tracks impact on girls.

Parent satisfaction is also an important measure of success at Girls Inc. We regularly conduct parent surveys to ensure our programs have the intended impact, with an average overall approval rating of 99%, that our programs make a difference in the lives of their daughters. Our goal is 100% parent satisfaction, and we work to achieve that outcome each day.

Girls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara is one of 79 affiliates of the national Girls Inc. organization. Informed by the national organizations' core identity programs we have been providing classes and activities with impact for 60 years to the girls in our community. Our curriculum and our outcomes are evidence-based and measured, to ensure we are having the greatest impact possible.

We have strong community support and program partners to help us provide a comprehensive "whole girl" approach. Partnerships support social/emotional development, mental wellness, movement and fitness, and academic enrichment and exposure to STEM career fields. Volunteers supplement homework help and tutoring programs. Women leaders from our community serve as "Wonder Women" role models for our girls so girls can see women who look like them in successful careers (this program has been placed on hold due to the pandemic.)

We have two physical campuses that house our after-school and summer enrichment programs, our teen onsite and outreach programs, and our gymnastics programs. We also join with the Girls Inc. network to advocate for girls at the local, state, and federal levels to advance policies that affirm girls' rights and opportunities, and gender equity. The national Girls Inc. advocacy platform focuses on four pillars: Combat bullying, sexual harassment, and sexual violence; Promote access to education and economic independence; Support girls' mental health; and Advance reproductive health.

In 2020, despite our centers closing for three months due to COVID-19, we served 943 girls (unduplicated) in all our programs, with 484 of those girls in our core programs (after-school, summer, teens, and outreach). Despite the significant constraints the pandemic placed on our program delivery, our staff delivered 76,156 total service hours (a 68% decrease from 2019.)

And in 2020, 270 eligible girls and teens received $202,000 worth of additional program fee reductions to help parents who were no longer able to work.

The pandemic has allowed GIGSB the opportunity to evaluate its program delivery model and begin piloting new alternate delivery options, including virtual programming. It became more important than ever to meet girls where they are, whether that be at home, at school, or another physical space. Girls Inc. partnered with the United Way of Santa Barbara County to become a Learning Collaborative Site, providing a safe place with reliable technology infrastructure for girls and teens to go during the school day to access their remote learning programs and receive homework and technical assistance from Girls Inc. mentors and staff.

We are continually strengthening and developing community partnerships in fields such as science, technology, engineering, art and math (STEAM), literacy, behavioral health, and opportunities for cross programming with other community organizations. And we continue to work with these partners to serve girls in school and community settings. After 2020, GIGSB began a plan to invest in its technology infrastructure to better support staff who were no longer center-based and staff working remotely.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Girls, teens, and their families. Also our staff.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, ongoing dialogue with girls, teens, and their families; girls and teens suggest programming ideas.,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    A few examples of changes our organization is making in response to stakeholder feedback include: Launching a staff-driven DEI advisory committee to outline our strategy, goals, and expectations to ensure an equitable and inclusive environment for staff and girls. (2021) We are in the process of changing from a paper-based to an online program registration system that is easier and simpler for parents/guardians to complete, and more efficient for staff to process. (2021) We surveyed staff in our needs assessment phase of our executive search process and made improvements to the leader profile and CEO job description to incorporate and elevate staff-identified competency and skill priorities for the position. (2021)

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Improving our feedback processes with our stakeholders is increasing trust and transparency.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, it can be difficult getting feedback from the girls we serve, who are as young as age 4.,

Financials

Girls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Girls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara

Board of directors
as of 9/9/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tracy Jenkins

Paige Beard

PWB International

Patricia Jones

CPA, Retired

Christy Kelso

Self-Employed

Nancy Leffert, Ph.D.

Retired

Joe MacPhee

CPA, Self-Employed

Betsy Manger

Retired

Karen Mims

The Towbes Group

Amber Ortiz

City National Bank

Connie Pearcy

Lois Rosen

Sudi Staub

Retired

Sarah Stokes

Self-Employed

Christi Sulzbach

Self-Employed

Caroline Thompson

Cabana Home

Meredith Tynes

Montecito Bank & Trust

Diane Zipperstein

Retired

Ann Daniel

Ann Daniel Productions

Carol Brumberger

Retired

Claudette Roehrig

Deana Hyde

Wells Fargo

Tracy Jenkins

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/08/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/08/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.