GOLD2022

EMOTIONAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION

creating safe, supportive, caring communities with self-help support groups

aka SHARE!   |   Culver City, CA   |  www.shareselfhelp.org

Mission

The mission of SHARE! the Self-Help And Recovery Exchange is to help people in Los Angeles pursue personal growth and change. SHARE! empowers people to change their own lives and provides them a loving, safe, non-judgmental place where they can find community, information and support.

Ruling year info

2001

Executive Director

Ruth Hollman

Main address

6666 Green Valley Circle

Culver City, CA 90230 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-6092809

NTEE code info

Independent Housing for People with Disabilities (L24)

Counseling Support Groups (F60)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SHARE! Collaborative Housing

SHARE! Collaborative Housing is an evidence-based program that moves homeless people with disabilities into single-family houses with all the amenities on their first phone call asking for housing. Each house has a Peer Bridger--a staff person in recovery from mental health, substance abuse, domestic violence, trauma, and/or homelessness—who visits the houses and partners with residents to form a self-help support group and a culture of recovery within the house. The Peer Bridger connects residents to self-help support groups in the community as well as to health, mental health, educational, vocational, and other services or resources each resident needs to follow their self-determined road to success. 58% of residents move out to market-rate housing as they get jobs and/or reunite with family members. The self-help support groups provide social support—which has been shown to account for 40% of health and mental health wellbeing. They are also an effective way to change habits that have kept people in poverty, and provide tools, friends and networks to help them pursue their dreams.

How we measure success:
We track demographic data, move-ins and move-outs, number of residents with jobs, number of residents attending school, number of residents receiving health, mental health or other services, the number of residents attending self-help support groups and where they moved to when they leave SHARE! Collaborative Housing. We use the County's HMIS system to track data and are implementing a new database to track much more information, so that we can analyze it to further improve outcomes. Residents have multiple avenues to report issues, instigate changes and express ideas on improving the program. In addition, residents complete an anonymous survey twice a year that measures satisfaction and allows residents to inform us anonymously of any issues that need to be addressed, including cultural competency. Our Quality Assurance Committee reviews the surveys and makes recommendations for changes. We will shortly be able to see in the County's Coordinated Entry System whether former residents have fallen into homelessness again.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
People with disabilities

SHARE! Peer Specialist Training has trained more than 300 Peer Specialists to provide Peer Services in the public mental health system. Almost all of the students in this program have found jobs using their learning from SHARE!’s program. SHARE! trains on evidence-based practices in Peer Services, including Self-help Support Groups, the Helper Therapy Principle, Peer Listening and Disclosing, Recovery Planning, Critical Time Intervention, and Peer Bridging. SHARE! also imparts its learning from 26 years of providing Peer Services in its Self-Help Centers to the trainees in the form of the SHARE! Peer Toolkit—28 tools for peer workers to use to inspire personal change, resolve conflict and support people in their recoveries. Mental Health America awarded SHARE! Advanced Peer Specialist Training National Certified Peer Specialist (NCPS) Certification.

How we measure success:
The strength of SHARE!’s training is confirmed by its high placement and retention rates (86% placed in public mental health system; 96% with jobs or in school) and positive evaluations. In-class evaluations found that students gave the training an average evaluation of 97%. Employers frequently hire SHARE! interns and contact SHARE! when they have peer openings as they have noticed that SHARE! graduates are superlative. Here is a representative comment, "Taking the Peer Specialist class has been a life changer for me. I enjoyed my time learning and becoming aware and educated. As a Peer Specialist it will better help my future and the future of my community and peers. Positive changes and so much information gathered."

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Substance abusers

The SHARE! Recovery Retreat has been operating since 2013 in Monterey Park and provides mental health consumers up to two weeks of intensive recovery activities, including self-help support groups, independent living skills, conflict resolution and paths to achieving goals. Living together as a family, participants take responsibility for everyday living, including a culture of support and recovery, meals, chores, budget and resolving issues as they arise. The SHARE! Recovery Retreat gives people the skills to maintain housing in the community and move ahead with employment and other life goals.

How we measure success:
In 2016 UC San Diego and Harder and company evaluated the SHARE! Recovery Retreat and found that it was effective in giving residents a positive trajectory in their lives. SHARE! also tracks demographics, Plans for Success, self-help support group participation and where each guest goes after the Retreat.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Substance abusers

Countywide referrals to 12,000 self-help meetings representing 750 different life-issues. Our information is updated often as self-help groups tend to move around or be moved around and come and go. We give meetings technical assistance including best practices. We help with meeting formation, content format, publicity, problems and have leads on meeting space throughout the County.

How we measure success:
For each call we track demographic and socioeconomic data, what issues the caller was interested in and which self-help support groups we referred them to. We call a sample of people receiving self-help support group referrals two weeks after the referral is made to see whether they have attended a group and get a subjective evaluation of the group if they have.

Population(s) Served
Adults

SHARE! Culver City and SHARE! Downtown LA are centers where a large community of self-help groups meet each week, addressing all kinds of issues, e.g. anger management, health, depression, self-esteem, relationships, childhood abuse, substance abuse, reaching goals hosting more than 100 weekly meetings with monthly attendance of 5,000 people. The centers are peer-run and open to everyone without intake. Operating since 1993, SHARE! has never asked a single person to leave the premises. Instead SHARE! uses the SHARE! Peer Toolkit to build trust, encourage personal change, maintain order, resolve conflict and include everyone in the community. Each center has a Volunteer-to Job program that gives anyone a meaningful job at SHARE!—no matter how limited their skills or debilitating their symptoms. SHARE! trains and encourages our Volunteer-to-Jobs participants until they develop the skills and confidence to obtain an unsubsidized job either at SHARE! or in the community.

How we measure success:
We track the number of self-help support group meetings, the number of attendees at each meeting, the donations that meeting attendees make, number of people who get housed or employment, number of volunteer hours provided. We do an anonymous survey twice a year for feedback and suggestions. We have Community Meetings quarterly where anyone can attend to discuss issues and improve the centers. We also have a suggestion box at each center to hear positive and negative comments about the center and its programs.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Substance abusers

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email, Open to anyone making suggestions or complaints,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Other than not having the right technology, we don't have any other challenges.,

Financials

EMOTIONAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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EMOTIONAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION

Board of directors
as of 08/02/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Brian Ulf

President & CEO, StrongHouse Realty Advisors

Term: 2016 -


Board co-chair

Carl Ferro

SHARE! Board VP / President, Sunfare

Term: 2019 -

Don Watson

Don Watson, CPA

Ninon Aprea

Consultant

John Kowalczyk, DO, FACOS

Medical Director, Urology Group of Southern California

Zuhaib Murtaza, MD

Resident Physician at HCA Healthcare

Tuan Ho

Executive VP/CFO, Interior Logic Group

Matt Nelson

Chief Risk Officer, Middle Market Banking, Wells Fargo

Justin Brimmer

Manager/Owner, Unorthodox, Inc.

Akwi Devine

President & Co-Founder, Vive Concierge

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/2/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability