GOLD2024

Strategies for International Development

Subsistence to Commercial Farming

aka SID   |   Washington, DC   |  www.sidworld.org

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Mission

Strategies for International Development helps poor farmers graduate from poverty by building successful farm businesses that increase their income. This includes conserving the natural resources upon which their businesses depend and helping women play an equal role in building these businesses. More than 75% of the world's poor are small farmers trying to make the transition from subsistence to commercial farming, but only a small percentage have access to technical assistance. In every region of every developing country, there are hundreds of communities and thousands of farm families. Fortunately, in many of these regions farmers produce a common cash crop. SID uses a regional approach that gives all the farmers producing the common crop a chance to graduate from poverty.

Ruling year info

1992

Executive Director

Charles A. Patterson

Main address

330 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE, Suite 304

Washington, DC 20003 USA

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EIN

98-0120837

NTEE code info

International Agricultural Development (Q31)

Rural (S32)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Strategies for International Development (SID) designs, proves, and promotes better methods for helping poor farmers graduate from poverty. We have good experience helping groups of 1,000 to 4,000 families graduate from poverty. However, 75% of the world's poor are small farmers, but less than 15% have access to agricultural or environmental extension. We are using this experience to focus on a method that gives many more farmers access to technical assistance. There is little to no salaried labor in rural communities, and their best opportunity for those who want to stay in their communities, rather than migrate, is to create a profitable family-farm enterprise. SID focuses on helping indigenous farmers and women, two marginalized groups, build successful family-farm enterprises.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

18,380 Arabica Coffee Farming Families in Guatemala Graduate from Poverty

We work in Alta Verapaz, the poorest of Guatemala's 22 departments. Alta Verapaz has 26% of Guatemalas coffee producers, but only 4.41% of national production. Farmers are poor because they have low productivity and they don't husk their coffee. Their earn $106 a year from their coffee when they could earn at least $700.

We started this project in 2018. Since then, the general population has increased their knowledge of the practices they need to adopt from 12% to 51% and their adoption from 12% to 42%.

The first group of 715 families receiving technical assistance have increased their income from a baseline of $106 a year to $842. The second group of 477 families have increased their income to $432. And, the third group of 2,165 families have increased their income to $346.

The women in the communities receiving technical assistance have increased their personal growth and competence from 19% to 84%. They also started second businesses which earn $200 to $300 a year.

Population(s) Served

SID works in 5 sub-counties of Luweero District, where farmers produce 452 Kilos of coffee per acre when the minimum for good coffee farming is 2,250 Kilos. 18% sell fresh cherries for the lowest price; 69% sell dry cherries for a better price; but only 13% husk their dry cherries and sell the beans directly to exporters. Average income is $397 per year when it could be $1,200.

In the first year of the project, the general population increased their knowledge of the knowledge of the practices they need to adopt from 56% to 69% and their adoption from 25% to 29%.

1,677 farm families in 115 villages receiving technical assistance increased their productivity from 113 to 127 kilos per 1/4 acre of coffee, sold more coffee in dried cherries, and had some modest increases in price. As a result, they increased their income from $397 to $512.

The women in the villages receiving technical assistance increased their personal growth and competence from 6% to 19%.

Population(s) Served

SID works in the Central Region of Malawi where dairy farmers have the best opportunity to graduate from poverty. They have more land for producing fodder than dairy farmers in other regions. They are also close the major market of the city of Lilongwe, the nations capital.

The dairy farmers are poor because their cows produce 9 or 10 liters per cow per day when they could produce 20, and only produce milk for 210 days a year when they could increase their production to 240 days. Farmers earn $200 per year when they could earn $700.

We started this project in 2023. We are helping 1,780 farmers grow Lucerne trees and Rhodes Grass, for better cattle feed. We are also doubling the number of trained Artificial Insemination technicians to improve the breeding of the cows. We are also helping farmer improve the health of their cows. And, for those farmers who do not have cows, we are helping them prepare applications for heifers to the Agricom Project funded by the World Bank.

Population(s) Served
Low-income people
Farmers
Families
Low-income people
Farmers
Families
Low-income people
Farmers
Families

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SID provides the assistance farmers need to transition from subsistence to successful commercial farming. We have developed a scalable and replicable model that allows us to provide this assistance to all farmers in a region so they can graduate from poverty.

We collaborate with farmers, local leaders and actors to help create sustainable prosperous rural communities in developing countries, where farmers do not need to migrate to cities or other countries in search of employment and a better life.

We use and promote a variety of innovative methods to help farmers adopt business as well as better farming practices while also reducing project costs. In addition, equal participation of women is a condition of all of our projects. Lastly, we measure results in terms of increases in farmers’ income and cost-effectiveness as the ratio of the increases in farmer income to project cost.

SID’s new innovative regional model partners with municipal leaders and actors and gives all farmers in a region the chance to graduate from poverty. All farmers learn and are encouraged to adopt the practices that increase productivity, price, and income and conserve farmland. In addition, “Leader Communities”, that agree to adopt all the practices, receive twice-monthly technical assistance, and become examples for others to follow.

We have 25 years’ experience helping farmers in Bolivia, Peru, and Guatemala increase their income from diverse products such as fresh milk, quinoa, seed potatoes, alpaca wool, llama meat, and coffee. We also helped the farmers reclaim their eroded soils and pastures and conserve semi-arid plains and mountainsides.

We have 15 years’ experience helping farmers make better business decisions by adopting basic business practices such as meeting and negotiating with major buyers, visiting farmers who are more advanced, making business plans, selecting the practices they will adopt, and evaluating their results.

We have 5 years of experience helping women set personal goals, solve common problems, and improve their capacity and confidence to speak in public. We also give them additional help in reading the words and performing the calculations required to make business plans. They acquire the tools they need to become good businesswomen, and they also increase their equality.

Our expectation is that farmers apply land conservation practices on at least two-thirds of their land and that increases in farmer income during the life of the project are at least five times project costs. We have been successful in meeting the target for land conservation and the ratios of increases in income to cost have ranged from 4.1 to 8.68.

In Peru, we have helped 150 dairy-farming families increase milk production from 4 to 7 liters of milk per cow per day and increase their income by 38%.

In September 2018, SID began the application of the Regional Model in Alta Verapaz, Guatemala. In December 2018, 767 farmers from 193 coffee-growing communities met in workshops and defined the practices they need to to graduate from poverty. Local partners have been promoting the practices and SID has been conducting demonstration fairs in them. After a year knowledge and adoption had more than doubled among the general population.

SID is also providing technical assistance in 69 communities in which farmers have agreed to adopt all 28 defined practices. In March 2020, at the end of the coffee harvest and first year of technical assistance, 675 farm families terraced 109 acres of their mountainside farmland. The National Institute of Electrification and National Institute of Forests gave us 20,000 trees, and farmers planted them on 134 acres. The farmers also increased the productivity of their coffee plots from 173 to 284 pounds of coffee per 1/9th of an acre, husking and sales directly to exporters from 0% to 21%, and income from $106 to $293 per year from coffee.

In addition, 84% of the women in the project also began a second business. The most common were raising and selling chickens, pigs, ducks, and turkeys; growing fruit, vegetables, and cardamom for sale; and roasting and selling ground coffee. Income from these businesses ranged from $9 to $42 a month.

Financials

Strategies for International Development
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Strategies for International Development

Board of directors
as of 03/08/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Nancy Hirschhorn

USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (Retired)

Term: 2019 -

Juan Cariaga

Board Member Emeritus

Christopher Goldthwait

U.S. Ambassador (Retired)

Amanda Jennnings

Millenium Challange Corporation

Martha Rebour

United Nations Foundation

Dan Berman

J&K Berman Memorial Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/6/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/14/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.