Malaria Consortium US

Where saving lives and great science go hand in hand

aka Malaria Consortium US   |   Raleigh, NC   |  https://www.malariaconsortium.org/us/us.htm

Mission

Malaria Consortium's mission is to improve lives in Africa and Asia through sustainable, evidence-based programmes that combat targeted diseases and promote child and maternal health.

Ruling year info

2011

President

Charles Nelson

Main address

8024 UPPER LAKE DRIVE

Raleigh, NC 27615 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

98-0627052

NTEE code info

(Specifically Named Diseases) (G80)

Community Health Systems (E21)

Health Support Services (E60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We work with partners, including all levels of government, to improve the lives of all, especially the poorest and marginalized. Our work is focused on the control, management and, where appropriate, the eventual elimination of range of diseases - malaria, pneumonia, diarrhoea, dengue and neglected tropical diseases. We balance this focus with other factors that affect child and maternal health, particularly malnutrition. We use data and learning from our implementation and operational research activities to inform our advocacy and engagement with decision makers. We do this at national and global levels to ensure our learning helps contribute to policy development and best practice. We capture and collate knowledge, learning and evidence relating to the focus and effectiveness of our work in a wide range of resources. By sharing these, we hope to provide knowledge on public health development that will help influence and advance both policy and practice.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Malaria Action Program for Districts

USAID’s Malaria Action Program for Districts is focused on preventing and controlling malaria morbidity and mortality in Uganda through support to the government on a range of activities to minimise the social impact and economic losses on those affected. The five-year project is being implemented by Malaria Consortium in 43 districts in the Central, Western and West Nile regions of Uganda. Between 2016 and 2021, the programme aims to reach an estimated 13 million people

Population(s) Served

Diagnosing pneumonia is challenging at all levels of healthcare. Diagnosis requires counting respiratory rates and inaccurate counts can lead to incorrect diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. Through the ARIDA project, Malaria Consortium aims to introduce automated respiratory rate counting aids for use by frontline health workers in resource limited community settings and health facilities that offer improved accuracy and effectiveness compared to current practice for classifying pneumonia.

Population(s) Served

SMC is a highly effective intervention to prevent malaria in those most vulnerable to the disease’s effects. It involves administering up to four monthly doses of antimalarial drugs to children aged 3-59 months during peak malaria transmission season. SMC has been shown to be effective, cost effective and feasible for the prevention of malaria among children in areas where the malaria transmission season is no longer than four months. Since it was approved by the WHO, SMC has been found to prevent up to 89 percent of malaria cases. An estimated 28-34 million children are eligible for SMC, the vast majority of whom live in the Sahel region.
Malaria Consortium has been leading the way on SMC globally. Initially through our pilot project in northern Nigeria and later through our UNITAID funded ACCESS-SMC project. ACCESS-SMC supported the national malaria control programmes of seven Sahelian countries (Burkina Faso, Chad, Guinea Conakry, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, The Gambia) to scale up their SMC coverage, with Malaria Consortium and partners providing technical, logistical and financial support for its implementation.
Malaria Consortium is supporting eligible countries to prepare to deliver SMC. This ranges from developing high level plans and policies at central level, right down to identifying the number of health workers needed in each remote village. To ensure delivery goes smoothly, we are assisting with timelines, assigning responsibilities, developing materials and ensuring all necessary stakeholders are on board – from ministers and health officials to the community health workers who administer the SMC drugs and town criers who inform communities about SMC. Additionally, Malaria Consortium supports countries with a wide range of knowledge and expertise, including supply chain management, health worker training, community mobilization and safety monitoring.

Population(s) Served

Funded by the Department for International Development (DFID)/UK aid, SuNMaP was launched in 2008 at a time when malaria was having a devastating impact upon Nigeria. The disease accounted for 60 percent of outpatient visits, placing a huge burden on the health system. Malaria was the cause of 30 percent of deaths in children under five – over 300,000 deaths every year.

Led by Malaria Consortium, in partnership with GRID Consulting and Health Partners International, the programme has contributed significantly to declining malaria rates and deaths in Nigeria. At the dissemination event delegates heard how, during its eight years of implementation, SuNMaP provided technical assistance to the Nigerian National Malaria Elimination Programme (NMEP) to scale up malaria control across ten states. Since 2008, SuNMaP has:
Saved the lives of 48,000 children under the age of five Distributed twelve million long-lasting insecticidal nets, contributing to the increase in coverage from 7 to 58 percent between 2008 and 2014 2.7 million malaria rapid diagnostic tests and 2.7 million antimalarial drugs (artemisinin-combination therapies – ACTs) were distributed Over 5 million ACTs were sold through the strengthened commercial sector 23,000 health workers were trained to diagnose and treat malaria in their communities.

Population(s) Served

The significant reduction of malaria morbidity and mortality in Myanmar is threatened by a number of factors. The largest of these threats is the emergence of drug resistant malaria parasites along the international border areas, including the Myanmar-Thailand and Myanmar-China borders as well as in some areas in central Myanmar.
At the time in 2015, no malaria surveys had been conducted at national scale to assess coverage of key malaria indicators. Although efforts are being made to improve the health information system in Myanmar, malaria data remain incomplete with regards to geographical coverage (past surveys did not fully capture hard-to-access areas), completeness, and coverage of high-risk groups.

To respond to this need, the National Malaria Control Programme conducted a national malaria indicator survey in 2015 with Malaria Consortium as the technical lead and funding support from the President’s Malaria Initiative, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Three Millennium Development Goal Fund (3MDG), GFATM and other partners. The results of this survey will help to prioritise malaria services more effectively to areas of greatest malaria burden and provide baseline malaria data to support future assessments of the impact of all malaria-related activities nationwide, as well as for future strategic planning.

Population(s) Served

Malaria Consortium's upSCALE Project is designed to integrate community health worker (CHW) service delivery platform into one comprehensive mobile phone application which integrated community health level indicators into Mozambique’s electronic District Health Information Software 2 (DHIS2) platform. upSCALE was originally piloted by Malaria Consortium in Inhambane and Cabo Delgado Provinces. Based on the positive impact, the Ministry of Health (MoH) approved the use of upSCALE for all CHWs in 2018 to assist with case management of common childhood and maternal illnesses. To ensure the long-term sustainability and utility of the CHW mHealth system, Malaria Consortium is working with MoH staff to drive content design, training and roll-out of the system, as well as hosting and use of the online dashboard.
The interactive upSCALE digital algorithm guides the CHW through routine health checks, diagnosis, treatment, referral and follow-up. It also provides modules for patient counselling, data management, stock out alert systems, surveillance and training. To enhance CHW motivation and performance, the upSCALE platform has a complementary tablet-based application for supervisors which enables them to improve CHWs’ performance and strengthen communication and feedback to CHWs. upSCALE’s data collection feature monitors the quality of service delivery and tracks procurement and supply of malaria and other commodities by integrating CHW level indicators into Mozambique’s electronic DHIS2 software. MoH officials receive real-time data from CHWs in a user-friendly format allowing them to ensure data-driven decision-making around investments for CHW programs, surveillance and responses to infectious diseases including malaria, and early detection of disease outbreaks.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

GiveWell Top Charity 2018

GiveWell Number 1 Top Charity 2019

GiveWell Number Top Charity 2017

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of health education trainings conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of training programs created

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

• fostering health systems effectiveness and efficiency
• delivering performance-based training and supervision to health workers across sectors
• designing and conducting cutting-edge implementation research, surveillance, monitoring and evaluation
• selectively scaling up and delivering sustainable, evidence-based health programs
• providing technical assistance and consulting services that shape and strengthen national and international health policies, strategies and systems and build local capacity, and
• ensuring our experience, thought leadership, practical findings and research results are effectively communicated and contribute to the coordinated improvement of access to and quality of healthcare.

We target six main disease areas of child and maternal health, malaria, pneumonia, malnutrition, diarrhea, Dengue and NTDs. We strengthen health systems to enhance preventive treatments, diagnosis and case management, vector control, insecticide and drug resistance management, quality improvement and elimination of disease. We use data and learning from our implementation and operational research activities to inform our advocacy and engagement with decision makers. We do this at national and global levels to ensure our research evidence and learning contribute health policy and practice.. We employ a range of innovative approaches, tools and techniques many of which we have introduced, tested and scaled up to help the delivery of sustainable health programs, such as community health delivery, digital health, capacity building, research, M&E and surveillance, and economic impact evaluation.

Health systems strengthening. Child and maternal care. Policy development and advocacy. Community health service delivery. public health communication. Monitoring and evaluation. Disease surveillance. Digital health strategies. Health worker capacity strengthening and performance improvement. Human resources for health and health worker supportive supervision. Diagnostic device research. Operational research. Costing and economic impact evaluation. Private sector health market engagement.

This information is described in detail in our annual report.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Malaria Consortium US
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Malaria Consortium US

Board of directors
as of 9/19/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Professor Marcel Tanner


Board co-chair

Dr. John Horton

Teressa Rhodes

Chuck Ferrick

Canisius Anthony

Professor Brian Greenwood

Peter Potter-Lesage

Dr. Joanna Schellenberg

Dr. Nermeen Varawalla

Dr. Precious Lunga

Dr. Simon Kay

Dr. Neil Squires

Dr. Allan Schapira

Mark Clark

Anthony Davy

Sarah Veilex

Baroness Shaista Ahmad Sheehan

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/27/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data