PATCH PEOPLE ATTENTIVE TO CHILDREN

Supporting Hawaii's Child Care Needs

aka PATCH   |   Honolulu, HI   |  www.patchhawaii.org

Mission

Our mission is to support and improve the quality and availability of care for the young people of Hawaii.

Notes from the nonprofit

Thank you for your interest in PATCH. Please feel free to contact us with any questions at [email protected] or 808-550-3852 for administration or 808-839-1988 for program assistance.

Ruling year info

1977

Interim Executvie Director

Ms. Carol Wear

Main address

560 North Nimitz Highway Suite 218

Honolulu, HI 96817 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

99-0167464

NTEE code info

Management & Technical Assistance (P02)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Child Care Resource & Referral Program

Child Care Resource & Referral: PATCH receives over 7,000 calls each year from families requesting assistance in finding quality care. PATCH keeps a database of all licensed child care providers in Hawaii.  We provide referral information online, in person and via telephone.  Through PATCH, parents learn about the types of child care that are available in their community, learn how to choose quality child care and get help with their special and personal child care needs.

Population(s) Served
Families
Infants and toddlers

Child Care Training: PATCH provides staff development or community-based training opportunities to persons offering child care services in all types of settings, parents and to the general public. PATCH delivered over 2,700 hours of training to more than 8,000 participants last year.  Recently, PATCH began offering online training for child care professionals including CDA (Child Development Associate) and CDA Renewal Training.  PATCH Scholarships are for college-level early childhood courses, for PACE classes taken if converted to college credits, or for direct assessment fees in obtaining a Child Development Associate (CDA) certificate. PATCH Child Care Recruiters recruit and assist potential child care providers to become qualified and meet requirements to become licensed by the State of Hawaii Department of Human Services and help them to start their own home child care business.  They are then serviced by other PATCH programs such as Child Care Resource and Referrals, Quality Care Program, USDA Food Program and more.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Administering the USDA Child Care Food Program: This program is designed to ensure children in daycare receive nutritious meals. Licensed family child care providers are eligible for the Child Care Food Program, a USDA program that provides partial reimbursement for nutritious meals served to children while in a family child care setting. PATCH also provides nutrition training to child care providers and to the families they serve.

Population(s) Served
Children
Economically disadvantaged people

Preschool Open Doors (POD) is a childcare program funded by the State of Hawaii that provides childcare subsidies to eligible low- and moderate-income families to pay for preschool tuition. The goal of POD is to promote school readiness while focusing on meeting the needs of the child. POD also aims provide children whose families might otherwise not be able to afford preschool the opportunity to gain essential skills to be successful in school and in life. There is no Parent/Guardian activity required but families must meet the income and other eligibility requirements. Underserve or at-risk children receive priority consideration for the POD program and funds are limited. POD currently serves more than 1,500 children annually by providing assistance to attend any one of the State-licensed preschools.

Population(s) Served
Children
Economically disadvantaged people

We provide specialized training that focuses on the child's development starting from infant and toddler ages, giving providers the background knowledge and skills to facilitate the infants to grow in mind, body and spirit. PATCH offers more than 100 different free training classes to child care professionals from all types of child care settings and other caregivers, including informal child care providers and parents. All classes are aligned with standards of the state’s ASK Core Areas and the Subject Areas of the National Child Development Associate Credential. In the future, classes will be offered for continuing education units. Classes are held in a variety of locations on each island. Resource libraries with videos on a variety of child care topics are available at PATCH offices. Each quarter, PATCH publishes and distributes a Training Calendar full of current child care information and scheduled classes. Our goal in this program is to increase the quality of care for infants and toddlers in all types of settings.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Caregivers

The Registry is a vital component of the statewide workforce and professional development system. The Registry program documents the qualifications of practitioners based upon training, experience, education, and professional achievements in the field of early care and education. Registry program provides career counseling to educators in the field as well as tracking Health and Safety Training Requirements

Population(s) Served
Older adults
Young adults
Seniors
Academics

Where we work

Awards

Spirit of Community Non-Profit Organization of the Year Award 2009

Aloha United Way

Hawaii's Best Places to Work 2009

Hawaii Business Magazine

Hawaii's Best Places to Work 2010

Hawaii Business Magazine

Hawaii's Best Places to Work 2017

Hawaii Business Magazine

Affiliations & memberships

Alliance for Children and Families - Member 2015

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Academics, Self-employed people

Related Program

Child Care Training, Scholarships and Recruitment Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Free child care workshops and trainings are offered throughout the state for parents, early education professionals & the general public. Due to Pandemic in 2019 all of our trainings moved to online

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Unemployed people

Related Program

Child Care Training, Scholarships and Recruitment Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

More Trainings provided online through our self paced platform which does not reflect in 2018 & 2019 counts

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

PATCH USDA Child Care Food Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

PATCH USDA Child Care Food Program provides access to healthy nutritious food for children from low-income families.

Number of referrals to resources offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Parents

Related Program

Child Care Resource & Referral Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Parents and caregivers received referrals to licensed child care in preschools, daycare homes, infant toddler centers , and before/after school programs, along with resources to choose quality care.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Preschool Open Doors

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Provided preschool tuition assistance for a year with state funds to children who are at-risk, have special needs, and are from low-income families.

Number of meals served to children in daycare from low-income families.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

PATCH USDA Child Care Food Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Food Program provides nutritional support services and tiered reimbursements to family child care homes for meals served to children from low-income families to promote child health.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

PATCH's goal is to be the primary resource for child care services, a one-stop shop for families, child care practitioners, and community for the State of Hawaii. We aim to:

Improve the Quality of Care and Education: Through our consumer education services we provide information and education materials that help families identify, select, and secure child care that best meets their unique needs.

Promote Professional Knowledge and Skills: for child care professionals and programs through professional development, resources, and technical assistance.

Build the Supply: Respond to gaps in the child care market by supporting recruitment and retention activities and by developing community partnerships.

Increase Family Awareness: Ensure that families have the information they need to make informed choices about all aspects of care for their children

PATCH currently has in place qualified staff with years of experience in their respective fields as well as in running the programs currently being offered. The organization has also built strong partnerships with private companies and public agencies as well as other non-profit organizations. PATCH plans to continue administering these very valuable and successful programs as well as adding to its portfolio of services in the future. We are also increasing our outreach efforts and media exposure to increase community awareness of our services and the importance of quality child care and gain more sustainable funding.

As shown on the financial documents attached, PATCH is financially sound and has in place an excellent Board of Directors and management team as well as substantial community support to guide the organization in meeting this goal.

PATCH routinely meets and exceeds the majority of quantitative and qualitative contractual milestones for service provision across all our programs. For e.g., we serviced 30% more people in child care workshops in the past three years, ensuring a steady growth of trained child care practitioners, and in our food program, saw over 30,000 additional meals being served in daycares each year.

What we still seek to accomplish? A higher level of community awareness, more reliable partners, and an increase in sustainable funding, particularly foundational and private giving, so we can continue to adapt and improve our services to meet the needs and respond to challenges of our community, particularly those who are less well-off.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

PATCH PEOPLE ATTENTIVE TO CHILDREN
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

PATCH PEOPLE ATTENTIVE TO CHILDREN

Board of directors
as of 11/23/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Abe Toma

Oceanit

Deborah Ng-Furuhashi

First Hawaiian Bank

Antonia Fujimoto

Kauai Community College

Shayna Tamashiro

Kaiser Permanente

Scott Fujieda

DataHouse

Abe Toma

Oceanit

Cara Tanimura

State of Hawaii Department of Education

John Miller

Central Pacific Bank

Sophia Wong

American Savings Bank

Dean Ueda

Keller Williams Honolulu

Lillian Kawano

Servco

Jacqueline Ng-Osorio

Consultant

Kimi Correa

LUVA Real Estate

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/23/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data