HAWAII MEALS ON WHEELS INC

Meals from the Heart = Food for the Soul

aka HMoW   |   Honolulu, HI   |  www.hmow.org

Mission

Hawaii Meals on Wheels is dedicated to helping Oahu's elders and individuals with disabilities preserve their independence at home. We do this primarily by providing nutritious meals and regular personal interaction with those we serve.

Ruling year info

1980

CEO

Michelle Cordero-Lee

Main address

PO Box 236099

Honolulu, HI 96823-3520 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

99-0198132

NTEE code info

Meals on Wheels (K36)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The elder population of Oahu is increasing at a high rate (the Silver Tsunami), and our service helps our clients maintain their independence in their homes, while decreasing the burden on care facilities and caregivers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Home Delivered Meals

Hawaii Meals on Wheels currently delivers meals on 57 routes on Oahu, extending from Ewa to Hawaii Kai, up to Wahiawa, and from Kaneohe to Waimanalo. Meals are primarily delivered at lunchtime with some dinner deliveries available. Each day, more than 400 homebound individuals receive hot meals and personal contact via our dedicated volunteers.

During the pandemic, HMoW added frozen meal delivery to its regular services and is providing meals to both individuals and residents of several senior living facilities.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with disabilities

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Better Business Bureau 2017

Meals on Wheels Association of America 2017

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2017

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Hawaii Meals on Wheels delivers more than a meal; we bring the reassurance of a familiar face.

Through our service approach it is our goal to provide our clients with health maintenance through a nutritious meal and safety check and have our volunteers experience a sense of giving back to their community.

HMoW's plan for promoting and maintaining service quality and program evaluation:

HMoW maintains a commitment to receiving feedback from clients, staff, volunteers, vendors, partners in the community. We conduct the following:

i. Annual surveys to volunteers and clients
ii. Annual surveys to partners
iii. Participation in community round tables

HMoW maintains organizational commitment to continuous quality of service through the following:

i. Providing educational training in areas of elder care, disaster training, cultural sensitivity, etc., to staff and volunteers
ii. Providing nutritional education to staff, volunteers, and clients

HMoW maintains a commitment to data and research by:

i. Collecting data and providing feedback to clients, staff, volunteers, and partners
ii. Tracking information in a client and volunteer database while maintaining the privacy of both

HMoW maintains a commitment to quality and consistency by:

i. Updating and creating policies and procedures for staff, volunteers, and clients as needed
ii. Creating and using an auditing function within the organization
iii. Following best practices with regard to information received

HMoW maintains a commitment to public awareness by:

i. Participating in provider meetings
ii. Partnering with organizations who provide elder care services
iii. Partnering with schools of social work, public affairs, etc.
iv. Meeting with community civic clubs, community organizations, etc.

Hawai'i Meals on Wheels (HMoW) was founded on April 29, 1979, to provide home-delivered meals to elderly and disabled persons on Oahu, with only $25 in our bank account, two routes, six clients, and six volunteers. We were started by a group of eight churches: Central Union, Church of the Cross Roads, Manoa Valley Church, Unitarian Church, First Christian Church, First Presbyterian, and First United Methodist. Our whole organization continues to operate out of two rooms in Manoa Valley Church, one of our founders.

We are in our 40th year of serving meals to Oahu's homebound Kupuna and disabled persons, and we have grown since then while constantly evolving to meet the needs of Oahu. In our 40th year we are and still continue to be in the business of taking care of our Kupuna. In 2018, we served nearly 100,000 meals to more than 800 clients. More than 97% of the people we serve are over the age of 60, and our clients are predominantly 80 to 99 years old (77%). Seven of our clients are over 100 years old.

We have years of experience in recruiting and maintaining a large force of over 500 volunteers and in serving meals all over Oahu. HMoW maintains 57 meal delivery routes (54 lunch routes and 3 dinner routes). We deliver from Waimanalo to Ewa and Wahiawa to Waikiki. We serve homebound Kupuna and persons with disabilities, providing socialization and a safety/wellness check along with a nutritious meal.

We have more than 10 years of partnerships with local companies such as First Insurance Company and Spectrum, who take on delivery routes two times a week. We have worked with the City and County of Honolulu's Elderly Affairs Division for more than 15 years now and have received Federal Title III and/or City and County Grant-In-Aid funding consistently during that time. We also have partnerships with local foundations such as BANKOH and First Hawaiian Foundation, who have funded our technology, cars, office equipment, and local fundraising events.

We have a commitment to eldercare issues. In addition, we promote continuous staff and volunteer education and training, and the staff attends two to four national conferences a year on elder issues.

In addition to the above, our business model allows us to: 1) serve healthy, nutritious, and therapeutic meals without expending the labor and resources required to equip an entire food service operation; 2) avoid the liability, risk, and institutional expenditure of operating a central kitchen; 3) be prepared in the event of a kitchen cancellation or disaster because we partner with other kitchens who are readily available to take on additional meal preparations if necessary; 4) keep our funding and staff focused on our program services, which are to facilitate the delivery of hot, nutritious meals and provide wellness checks.

HMoW maintains meal delivery 57 routes (54 lunch routes and 3 dinner routes). We deliver from Waimanalo to Ewa and Wahiawa to Waikiki. In 2018, we served nearly 100,000 hot meals to more than 800 homebound kupuna and persons with disabilities, providing socialization and a safety/wellness check as well. We are excited about our growth in services; however, with every growth comes growing pains.

Some of our growing pains are:

Growing pain 1: The aging out of our volunteer work force. We are in a constant cycle of recruiting new volunteers and are in the process of implementing the following solutions:
• Solution 1: using various campaign methods such as technology and social media (our website, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc.) to garner more attention from the younger population.
• Solution 2: implementing flexible volunteer training times and locations; we used to hold one training a month at our Manoa office, but now we are allowing for training to be at the kitchen itself.
• Solution 3: recruiting more corporate partnerships. Corporate partnerships are very beneficial for us for two reasons: 1) they have provided not only monetary support but have also given us support in usage of their staff time (for example: First Insurance and Spectrum commit to taking on a route twice a week; their employees sign up to deliver in their work neighborhood on their lunch hour), 2) partnerships with companies also give us greater visibility in the community.
• Solution 4: implementing specialized marketing campaigns to recruit specialized groups (churches, community groups, military branches, etc.).

Growing pain 2: The Silver Tsunami. As with all of our nonprofit colleagues, we are trying to keep up with the needs of a growing elder population.
• Solution 1: consistency and frequency in auditing client logistics and placement, which enables us to fill routes, audit delivery order, review long holds, etc.
• Solution 2: effective strategic planning with the Board, projecting forward 3 years, 5 years, 10 years, etc.; looking at strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

Growing pain 3: Lack of visibility of HMoW in the community. Despite the large outpouring of support and donations we receive from the community at large, much of the public still does not truly understand who we are and what we do. In fact, many get us confused with other Meals on Wheels organizations on Oahu, or did not realize that our meals are hot and that they can be delivered from within their own community.
• Solution 1: implementing various awareness campaigns: media and PR releases in local papers, attendance at local community functions, fairs, neighborhood board meetings, etc., especially in areas where we are opening new routes.
• Solution 2: establishing a satellite office to demonstrate visibility and commitment to the community in an area where the aging population is growing significantly (e.g., central or west Oahu).

Financials

HAWAII MEALS ON WHEELS INC
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HAWAII MEALS ON WHEELS INC

Board of directors
as of 1/4/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

not applicable

Geoffrey Pang

American Business Marketing

Rickey Murashige

Kuakini Health System

Ross Esaki

Allstate

Edwina Suzuki

Hawaii Central Federal Credit Union

Samuel Suen

Law Office of Samuel K. L. Suen LLLC

Robert Takeshita

Territorial Savings Bank

Michael Tottori

First Hawaiian Bank

Brenda Wong

Kapi`olani Medical Center for Women and Children

Clarissa Bueno

Hawaiian Electric

Wendy Oshiro

Open Mortgage

Rick Tabor

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/02/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Filipino
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/02/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.