HAWAII WILDLIFE FUND

#keephawaiiwild

aka Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund   |   Paia, HI   |  www.wildhawaii.org

Mission

Summary: NATIVE HAWAIIAN WILDLIFE PROTECTION, RESEARCH AND EDUCATION "HAWAI'I WILDLIFE FUND (HWF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the conservation of Hawaii's native wildlife through research, education, restoration and advocacy. HWF Team is made up of educators, conservationists, researchers, naturalists, communities, volunteers and donors devoted to the protection of Hawaii's fragile marine ecosystem and inhabitants. We bring a variety of experiences together to serve a common goal."

Notes from the nonprofit

Mahalo for taking this opportunity to learn more about HWF and our activities to support native wildlife in Hawai‘i. Please contact us directly if you'd like any additional information about our past or current programs, organizational history / policies / financials, or with any suggestions for our future endeavors.

Ruling year info

1996

Executive Director

Ms. Hannah Bernard

Main address

Po Box 790637

Paia, HI 96779 USA

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EIN

99-0326669

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Hawksbill Sea Turtle Recovery Project

HWF has been conducting research and monitoring the nesting activities of hawksbill sea turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) since 1996. There are fewer than 100 adult female hawksbills known to nest in all of Hawai‘i. The species is listed as endangered in Hawai‘i and worldwide and needs our protection. Through conservation efforts, public awareness, beachfront lighting reductions, fence repairs, dune restoration, beach cleanups, radio and satellite telemetry, coordination of a Turtle Watch program, and determining in-water distribution and abundance, HWF is helping to save hawksbills and their nesting habitats.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Through its Honu Watch program, Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund monitors basking honu (green sea turtles) to educate visitors about the phenomenon called "basking," a rare behavior where turtles crawl ashore for reasons other than nesting. No other species of sea turtles are known to bask. Basking turtles are common in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands but seen on a more limited basis around the main islands, which is where HWF volunteers help protect turtles.

Turtles are especially vulnerable while basking on shore. Possible reasons for the behavior are that basking allows turtles to rest, raise their body temperature and/or to avoid predators (sharks). There may be other health-related benefits that are currently not understood, so it's important that the basking turtles are never disturbed. Show turtles aloha. Please do not approach closer than 15 ft (5 m). Flash photography disturbs them, so please take photos without a flash. Dogs can also injure turtles, so please keep them leashed.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Since 1996, HWF and volunteers have removed over 720,000 lbs (360 tons) of marine debris from the shores of Hawaiʻi Island, Maui, Midway and Lalo. HWF continues to host regular community cleanups on Hawaiʻi and Maui. Since 2020, we have collectively removed 50,140 lbs during 105 cleanups (98 on Hawaiʻi, 7 on Maui).

In addition to picking up debris, we are committed to preventing it in the first place. All our cleanup activities include a briefing about reducing use of single-use plastics, and encouraging a behavioral shift away from this primarily plastic-pollution problem. Additionally, our mentors visit GK-12 classrooms to share our "Marine Debris Keiki Education & Outreach" program lessons with island youth (see https://www.wildhawaii.org/our-work/education/keiki-education).

We also partner with other local businesses, nonprofits and agencies to build the capacity for marine debris removal statewide and support collaboration and a #teamupcleanup mentality whenever possible.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund educators are excited to share our newest environmental education unit, Hawaiian Coastal Ecosystems (, designed for middle school teachers and their students. We are currently targeting 5th-7th grade classrooms statewide to share our newly developed unit that focuses on estuaries, tidepools, anchialine pools and fishponds.

To develop this program, we piloted lessons at several Hawaiʻi Island schools in 2016 and reworked the program over the summer. Since then, we have brought these lessons to another 40+ classrooms, reaching more than 850 students to date.

Students get hands-on experience with scientific equipment, perform data collection and analysis, conduct hypotheses testing and direct observation of living organisms, and learn through role-playing. Culminating service-learning fieldtrips can also be arranged as logistics allow for students on Maui and Hawaiʻi islands. HWF will bring the whole show to your school or it can be shared virtually, as requested.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Social and economic status
Native Hawaiians

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our Mission: TO SUPPORT CONSERVATION OF HAWAI`I'S NATIVE WILDLIFE THROUGH RESEARCH AND EDUCATION. HWF is a non-profit research and education organization dedicated to the conservation of native wildlife. We collaborate with other scientists to obtain knowledge about threatened and endangered species in order to assist in their recovery. We forge alliances and partnerships with community organizations and businesses to educate visitors and residents of Hawaiʻi about the marine ecosystem and impending threats. We support various Univ. of HI student projects through research and education programs. As of Nov. 2021, we have drafted a feedback survey to share with the human communities we work in, we only wish we could survey the plants & animals. Please contact us for more survey info.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, With whomever requests it.,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

HAWAII WILDLIFE FUND
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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HAWAII WILDLIFE FUND

Board of directors
as of 02/08/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Megan Rose Lamson

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund

Term: 2019 - 2023

Maura Naughton

Retired USFWS

Nadine Robertson

Volunteer

Donna Kahakui

Retired USEPA

John Elkjer

Sustainable Island Products

Jean Campbell

County of Hawaiʻi

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/14/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.