Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii

GREAT FUTURES START HERE

aka Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii   |   Honolulu, HI   |  http://www.bgch.com/

Mission

The Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii (BGCH) is a non-profit youth guidance organization serving youth 7-18 years of age. Our mission is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens. Our first club opened 1976 in Honolulu and we have since grown to 10 clubhouse and teen centers on Oahu and Kauai, serving nearly 4,300 youth annually and over 11,000 youth through outreach services. BGCH offers a safe place for youth to be when they are not in school, caring adult mentors to guide them, and enriching and engaging youth development programs to help them graduate from high school and attending post-secondary education with a plan for their future.

Notes from the nonprofit

Since 1960, Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii’s mission is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens. Our vision is to provide a world class club experience that assures success is within reach of very young person who enters our doors with all members on track to graduate from high school with a plan for their future, demonstrating good character and citizenship, and living a healthy lifestyle. Our purpose is to inspire and empower youth to achieve success, and champion opportunities for all young people. BGCH serves youth aged 7 – 17 years on the islands of Oahu and Kauai and our 10 clubhouses are located on or near Title I schools. Our youth come from all backgrounds, ethnicities, race and genders. BGCH charges only $25/year youth and $10/year teen membership fees to ensure that a family’s ability to pay is never a barrier to their child accessing our programs.

Ruling year info

1969

President and CEO

Mrs. Paddy Kauhane

Main address

1000 Bishop Street Suite 505

Honolulu, HI 96813 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

BGCH

EIN

99-6005407

NTEE code info

Boys and Girls Clubs (Combined) (O23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The mission of Boys & Girls Clubs of Hawaii is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens. The after-school hours have become a critical time for youth – a time when many children in our communities are left to fend for themselves without positive adult supervision. Some don’t get a healthy, balanced meal, or any evening meal whatsoever. Others, who need help with homework or other challenges, have nowhere to turn. This can lead to low graduation rates, violence and crime, drug and alcohol use, bullying, and suicide. By the time they reach 6th grade, youth from middle-class families have likely spent 6,000 more hours learning than kids born into poverty. This is the problem Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii works to address. We provide a safe place filled with hope and opportunity, ongoing relationships with caring adult mentors, and enriching programs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Clubhouse Services

BFCH serves school-age youth through a variety of programs including homework assistance, technology centers, teen centers, career exploration, job assistance, sports and recreation, art classes and leadership development.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Children and youth

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Boys & Girls Club of America 1976

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Youth enrolled in a BGCH clubhouse each year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children, Adolescents

Related Program

Clubhouse Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, BGCH was limited in how many youth and teens we could serve safely in our clubhouses. To engage more youth, we implemented virtual programs and had over 22,000 enrolled.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our main goal is to provide a world class Club-Experience that assures success is within reach of every young person who walks through our doors, with all members on track to graduate from high school with a plan for the future and demonstrating good character and citizenship while living a healthy lifestyle.

Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii's main strategy is to provide a safe place for kids to go afterschool through our 9 clubhouses in Hawaii. At these clubhouses, our youth members are provided with enriching activities and positive adult mentorships. Our members are provided with tutoring, computers, and the tools they need to succeed academically, as well as enriching classes and sports activities. Strategies include:

After School/Out-Of-School Hours: We provide safe, fun and affordable places for kids to go during this critical out-of-school time. Our Clubhouses connect kids with caring, trained professionals who engage our members in enriching programs and activities.

Clubhouses: Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii provides neighborhood-based centers designed solely for youth programs and activities. Our Clubhouses are open every day after school and during school breaks when kids have free time and need positive, productive outlets.

Programs: Through engaging programs such as Character & Leadership Development, Education & Career Development, Health & Life Skills, Arts, and Sports, Fitness & Recreation programs, Boys & Girls Clubs of Hawaii is filling the opportunity gaps faced by many of the kids and families we serve.

Partnerships: BGCH partners with families, community service organizations, school districts and government agencies to help close the opportunity gap and provide our kids with the resources and programs they need to succeed.

Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii is part of the national network, Boys & Girls Club of America. Through this tested and proven method of youth outreach and support, Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii has established 9 clubhouses in Hawaii where we served more than 15,000 youth members each year through membership and outreach programs. We have the staffing and experience in place to achieve our goals.

Our progress towards our goal includes:

• 4 Million kids and teens served each year by Boys & Girls Clubs nation-wide.
• 9 BGCH clubhouses on Oahu and Kauai.
• 4,213 youth were enrolled in a BGCH Clubhouse in 2019.
• 10,730 non-member youth and 5,662 adults are reached each year through outreach programs such as ohana nights or community volunteer work.
• 4.6 hours our members receive each day of expanded learning and engagement time, a 58% increase over the school day alone. That’s the equivalent of 136 extra school days.
• 24% of our youth avoid summer learning loss by participating in our Summer Programs.
• $25 is the cost of membership for members aged 12 and under, and $10 for teens.
• $1,400 is the actual cost of providing services to one youth for a year. The difference between the annual membership fee charged to members and the actual cost of $1,400 is made up through grants and donations.
• 67% of BGCH alumni say that the club kept them out of trouble with the law
• 83% of BGCH members believe they can make a difference in their communities.
• 98% of BGCH members are on track to graduate high-school on-time.
• 104 is the optimum number of time for a youth to attend a BGCH Clubhouse in a year to experience maximum positive outcomes.


For many families, the financial impact of Covid-19 will be significant. As 83% of BGCH families are low to very low income, losing their income when businesses close or facing extensive medical bills will create challenges that will be extremely difficult for them to overcome. Our families will need Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii more than ever. When we reopen our doors, they can trust that their children will be safe and well-fed while parents work extra hours to catch up. And, in the meantime, our staff have implemented virtual programming to keep our children and teens engaged and we are utilizing our clubhouses as distribution centers to provide food and supplies to our communities.

For children and teens, this crisis will impact their academic progress and sense of safety. We will help them make up for lost time at school with fun and enriching educational programs under the guidance of our caring and trained Youth Development Professionals. When it is time for our children and teens to return to the Club, we will be waiting and ready to provide a safe and fun environment where they can get back to the important business of enjoying childhood

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    BGCH serves youth aged 7 – 17 years on the islands of Oahu and Kauai and our 10 clubhouses are located on or near Title I schools. Our youth come from all backgrounds, ethnicities, race and genders. BGCH charges only $25/year youth and $10/year teen membership fees to ensure that a family’s ability to pay is never a barrier to their child accessing our programs. This is particularly important since currently 79% of our families are designated low to extremely low income according to HUD standards. BGCH recognizes that not all youth have equal access to resources to help them succeed, which is why we bring resources to our clubhouses through partnerships with education institutions, government, trade unions, corporations and other community based organizations.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email, Social Media/Newsletters,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Through the Covid-19 pandemic one of the first challenges BGCH identified through a survey to our families was a broadband inequity. 25% of our member families did not have access to quality and reliable WiFi connectivity and/or technology in their homes. This was a huge concern since families were required to shelter in place; children taking part in their school lessons virtually and adults working remotely wherever possible. BGCH made it a priority to find resources in free WiFi through local companies and donations of laptops, tablets and computers to those who did not have them. When we were allowed to open our clubhouses safely, we changed our operations from "after school" to "out of school", doubling our operating hours and offering our clubhouses as distance learning centers.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Collecting and valuing feedback from our stakeholders has allowed BGCH to build a positive and supportive ecosystem within our communities with a focus on our purpose: to inspire and empower youth to achieve success, and champion opportunities for our youth. Communications helped us to identify gaps in services and resources so we could build partnerships with other organizations, individuals and government to create a safety net during a worldwide pandemic. Community feedback also identified disparities such as families in specific areas who needed more resources than others and specific youth who were struggling with learning loss, increased mental health issues and food insecurities. By identifying the needs, we knew better how to allocate the resources.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, Language barriers,

Financials

Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii

Board of directors
as of 4/13/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Christina Hause

Kaiser Permanente Hawaii

Term: 2021 - 2022

Danielle Aiu

American Savings Bank

Philana Bouvier

Young's Market Company of Hawaii

Chris Hause

Kaiser Permanente

David Hudson

Central Pacific Bank

John Katahira

The Limtiaco Consulting Group

Robert Kurisu

WKF, Inc.

Nikki Moreno

Aulani, a Disney Report and Spa

Bruce Nakaoka

Queen Emma Land Company

Nathan Okubo

Cades Schutte

Nancy Pace

Community Volunteer

Jeff Pauker

Alexander & Baldwin

Billy Pieper

Barclay US

Cindy Sakai

TH!NK, LLC

Mike Taylor

Bank of Hawaii

Donna Yano

Blue Pacific Management LLC

Michael Town

Brian Yoshii

Queens Health Systems

Walter Guild

Heyer & Associates

Christian Adams

Adams Krek LLP

Michelle Akina

Lili'uokalani Trust

Scott Choi

Hawaiian Host

Dylan Ching

TS Restaurants

Mark Cochrane

Enterprise Holdings Hawaii

Peter Hirano

Servco Hawaii

Keslie Hui

HNL Development LLC

Andrew Kamikawa

Gentry Homes Ltd

Dan Nishikawa

First Hawaiian Bank

Bonnie Pang

Atlas Insurance Company

Stacey Williams

KHON2

Darcie Yukimura

Hawaii Community Foundation

Dan Cooke

Howard Hughes Corporation

Scott Creel

Brookfield Properties

Francoise Culley-Trotman

Alohacare

Lina Le

Y Hata & Company Ltd.

Nicholas Monlux

Kobayashi Sugita & Goda, LLP

Shannon Nishio

Empower Retirement

Michal-Anne Rogondino

Rocket Communications

Elizabeth Makarra

Waikiki Health

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/13/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/13/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.