PLATINUM2024

Foster Adopt Connect Parent

Serving abused and neglected children and the families caring for them.

Independence, MO   |  www.fosteradopt.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Foster Adopt Connect

EIN: 43-1895965


Mission

Our mission is “to provide foster and adoptive children a stable, loving and nurturing family environment by support and advocacy for abused and neglected children and the families caring for them.”

Ruling year info

2001

CEO & Founder

Lori Ross

Main address

18600 E 37th Terrace S.

Independence, MO 64057 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Midwest Foster Care and Adoption Association

EIN

43-1895965

Subject area info

Adoption

Foster care

Family counseling

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Families

Foster and adoptive children

At-risk youth

NTEE code info

Foster Care (P32)

Adoption (P31)

Family Counseling, Marriage Counseling (P46)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As the number of children entering foster care continues to grow, so too grow the needs of the foster/adoptive families that compose the backbone of the child welfare system. Families struggling to access resources for their children are more likely to end their service to the state by allowing their foster care license to lapse, draining the system of invaluable childcare experts and lengthening the time children spend in care. Children who do not receive the services they need to heal from past trauma are less likely to succeed in school or household settings, and are more likely to experience negative outcomes in adulthood like time spent in prison, homelessness, and addiction. FosterAdopt Connect works to meet the needs of children and families in our region by providing programs and services that support permanency and stability – connecting children, families and relatives to the resources they need.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Recruitment Programs: 30 Days to Family & Extreme Family Finding

30 Days to Family® is an intense, short-term intervention designed to increase the number of children placed with family or friends within the first 30 days of entering foster care.

Extreme Family Finding™ puts a team of recruiters and private investigators to work finding multiple extended family members and kin relationships for children most at risk of aging out of foster care without an adoptive resource. This includes older youth, large sibling groups, and children with significant medical or mental health issues.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Young adults
Caregivers
Families
Parents

Behavioral Interventionist (BI) program provides intensive one-on-one services to children who struggle with behavioral and emotional management. Behavioral Interventionists work with children on neuro-development activities that help to re-wire negative neuropathways in the brain. This modality helps to break the cycle of continually living in flight, fight, or freeze mode. Through role-modeling, coaching, and re-direction, our direct care staff help children self-regulate and develop independence in their daily living activities.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Families
Parents
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Community Youth Connections Project® (CCYP) helps older youth in foster care navigate the struggles of approaching adulthood without a solid support system. As foster care alumni, our case managers offer a unique perspective on how to transition from foster care to self-sufficiency because they have made that leap themselves.

We connect youth to resources in several areas, including housing, higher education, employment, healthcare, finances, social supports, transportation, legal advocacy, and more. Our goal is to see young adults find stable housing, secure employment, and develop necessary skills to thrive in adulthood.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults
At-risk youth

The Connect Café is a Social Enterprise Program of FosterAdopt Connect. The goal of the Connect Café is to provide youth currently or formerly in foster care with work experience, job skills, and soft skills that are helpful in successfully navigating future employment and advancement opportunities.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Young adults

A hybrid clothing closet and food pantry program, Sammy’s Window helps lift the financial burden of caring for foster and adopted children and enhances the capacity of regional foster homes to provide care to an increasing number of children in Missouri and Kansas.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Families
Parents
Adults
Children and youth

Fostering Prevention's mission is to strengthen parents’ capacity to provide safe, permanent, and nurturing homes for their children. We provide evidenced-based parenting curriculum, resource identification and connection, support, and advocacy to families who are coping with significant hardships. The goal of Fostering Prevention is to prevent children from unnecessarily entering foster care.

Fostering Prevention is offered at these branch offices: Independence, MO; Springfield, MO; Kansas City, KS; Chillicothe, MO; Poplar Bluff, MO; Joplin, MO; and Kirksville, MO.

The purpose of Kinship Navigator is to build or enhance protective factors for kinship families that are not actively involved in the child welfare system, but who are caring for relative children at risk of entering or reentering foster care.

Kinship Navigator is offered at these branch offices: Independence; Springfield; Chillicothe; Poplar Bluff; Joplin; Hannibal; Kirksville; and Kansas City, KS.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Families
Caregivers
Children and youth
Adults

The Clinical Services Program develops and implements a systemically integrated Trauma Informed philosophy and practice by providing innovative Trauma Focused Clinical Consultation and modeling adaptive evidence-based techniques, by connecting resources to foster adoptive youth, and identifying providers to promote social and emotional wellness, overall success, and comprehensive support, and by proactively altering the direction of treatment by growing an understanding of brain based decision making. The Clinical Services Program provides individual therapy, family therapy, neurofeedback, and in the future will integrate Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics Assessments.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Parents
Caregivers
Adults
Families

Our Licensing program staff work directly with families to complete the requirements of licensure for pursuing fostering and adopting children from the child welfare system in Missouri. After licensing approval, staff continue to assist families as they begin the fostering process by providing advocacy, support, resources, and ongoing training. We also qualify people to provide temporary respite care services for Missouri foster children to help foster, kinship, and adoptive families get needed help.

Parent training classes that help foster parents earn credits to maintain foster home licensure in Missouri and Kansas. We offer a variety of in-person and virtual training options for families.

Population(s) Served
Foster and adoptive parents
Caregivers
Families

The Family Advocacy program connects foster parents who’ve been in the trenches of foster care and adoption to help address the specific concerns of advocacy clients. Advocates listen, educate, and plan what steps clients can take to get the answers and solutions they need.

Our legal advocacy team provides youth currently or formally in foster care assistance with traffic violations, landlord/tenant concerns, and other minor criminal infractions. Because these youth do not have the personal resources or parental support to help get them out of trouble, legal advocacy support is essential.

Population(s) Served
Families
Foster and adoptive parents
Caregivers
Foster and adoptive parents
Young adults
Adolescents

The goal of the YouthConnect Center (YCC) is to bridge a gap in services to homeless, disconnected or otherwise at risk youth as well as their caregivers and family. The YCC aims to reduce youth homelessness by encouraging family connections, building natural supports and providing access to meaningful resources.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adolescents
At-risk youth
Victims and oppressed people
Out-of-home youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA) [for Children and Family Services] - Accreditation 2022

Missouri Children's Division Child Placing Agency 2022

Kansas Department of Children and Families Child Placing Agency 2022

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

North American Council on Adoptable Children (NACAC) 2011

United Way Member Agency 2017

Council on Accreditation 2022

Missouri Children's Division Child Placing Agency 2022

Kansas Department of Children and Families Child Placing Agency 2022

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Caregivers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of clients served who are provided a legal permanency option

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Preteens

Related Program

Recruitment Programs: 30 Days to Family & Extreme Family Finding

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percent of children placed with relatives at case closure

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Recruitment Programs: 30 Days to Family & Extreme Family Finding

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percent of clients who report being satisfied with program services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, Families

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percent of clients needing housing who obtained stable housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults

Related Program

Community Connections Youth Project

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of program sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of programs documented

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new programs/program sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of hours of training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Licensing, Respite & Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

All FosterAdopt Connect programs and services will be high quality, customer service focused, innovative, solution driven, and responsive to the best interests of children. Through sustained and targeted direct support services to families and foster and adoptive children, FosterAdopt Connect positively impacts outcomes for children who have experienced abuse and neglect. Children heal within family units. Families who are supported are retained as caregivers and develop advanced skills necessary to effectively parent traumatized children.
Permanency: These programs are aimed at connecting children to their forever homes. Whether that is through our family-focused programs or working in our Behavioral Interventionist program, permanency is always a top priority.
Support: FosterAdopt Connect believes that when families feel supported in their journey within the child welfare system, they are well-equipped to provide the best care to the children in their home. Our food pantry and clothing closet, along with our licensing and training programs work to support the families who are providing a loving and stable home to foster and adoptive children.
Advocacy: Being involved in the child welfare system is not easy, which is why FosterAdopt Connect provides advocacy services to the parents and guardians who need help navigating the system. This peer-to-peer support network is in the trenches with foster and adoptive parents providing crisis management and guidance so that parents and guardians can continue to provide exceptional care to their childrenChildren: Make Connections: FosterAdopt Connect's youth support programs work to connect children and young adults who are at risk of aging out of foster care to their communities. These programs are aimed at supporting these young adults in navigating adulthood by learning their life goals and connecting them to the resources that will help them reach those goals. Stay Responsive: Children's needs are always evolving and FosterAdopt Connect works to stay aware of any changes and fill any gaps that may exist in the system. Our innovative solutions to the challenges children in foster care face are aimed at providing children in care hope for their future. Timely Service: Oftentimes, children who are in the child welfare system are not able to receive necessary behavioral health services, legal services, stable housing, or life skills. FosterAdopt Connect strives to reduce the amount of time it takes for children and young adults in foster care to access these services so they can continue to grow with their foster and adoptive families or thrive in adulthood. Over the next three to five years, we anticipate piloting new services that enhance the likelihood of stability for families and children, and expanding the geographic footprint of our existing services in Kansas and Missouri.

Listening to families and filling the gap: We work with many foster, adoptive, and kinship families through our Family Advocacy program that allows our staff to determine where gaps in the child welfare system exist, and how our agency can fill them with innovative services or partnerships. 

Opening resource centers: We have found our programs are very successful when implemented with a “one-stop-shop” approach where families can access multiple services without needing to travel great distances or wait for long periods. The resource center model of service provision reinforces this approach by collecting many services under a single roof. We currently have 11 resource centers in Missouri and Kansas.

Developing innovative solutions: FosterAdopt Connect seeks to develop innovative and novel programs/services that help fill gaps in the child welfare system.

FosterAdopt Connect was originally formed as a small support group for foster/adoptive families and continues to be guided by our founding principles of support and advocacy for families involved in the child welfare system. Many of our professional staff have direct, personal involvement in the child welfare system. This kind of connection to the populations that we serve gives FosterAdopt Connect a unique grass roots approach to the services we provide to foster and adoptive children and families. Our dedicated staff members are experts in the challenges facing foster/adoptive families, and consistently work to raise the standards by which we measure quality service within the child welfare system. FosterAdopt Connect has been working within the child welfare system for many years, which has presented many opportunities to build partnerships and networks across the state of Missouri. Working together within our networks has helped our services impact the children and families that we serve by connecting our clients to other community resources available to them. As a result of our dedicated staff and the partnerships we have developed, FosterAdopt Connect has become well-known in the foster and adoptive communities. In order to have a bigger impact on the populations that we serve, FosterAdopt Connect has made advocating at the grassroots level a priority for the organization. We have successfully advocated around funding a policy so that foster and adoptive children have a better chance to maintain permanency and thrive in a stable, loving, and nurturing family.

In 2013, with the help of Lifeworks Family Treatment Group, FosterAdopt Connect’s CEO & Founder, Lori Ross, designed and secured funding to pilot an innovative in-home support program for youth with significant mental health and behavioral issues which might otherwise only be treated in a residential setting. In 2014, due to the success of the Behavioral Interventionist (BI) Program, FosterAdopt Connect (FAC) began to offer the services internally as well. In 2016, a contract was reached with the Children’s Division for an increase in funding for the BI program, with a goal of getting this service available statewide. In the fall of 2019, FAC received funding from the Kansas state line, enabling us to expand the BI program to Johnson and Wyandotte counties.  

In 2014, FAC officially merged with two existing nonprofit agencies with similar missions, taking on the responsibility for service provision in their service areas. This brought FAC’s presence to Southwest Missouri (Springfield) and to Johnson County, Kansas (Olathe). 

In 2015, FAC designed and piloted a program with community funding to reach out to, and provide services to, youth between ages 16 and 26 who are in the process or have already aged out of the foster care system. The program was named the Community Connections Youth Project (CCYP). The state of Missouri included funding to expand this program in its budget that summer.

In 2017, FAC received funding from the state of Missouri to expand its geographical services area to cover Northwest Missouri (Chillicothe) and Southwest Missouri (Poplar Bluff). Resource centers in both of those cities were opened in the fall of 2017. 

In 2018, FAC was able to purchase its Springfield building, paving the way for the remodel to be the center for services in Southwest Missouri ongoing. In late 2020, plans to expand services in Kansas begun to take shape and we were able to purchase a larger building in Wyandotte County, Kansas. We were awarded 3 significant contracts from DCF and received additional funding to pilot our first prevention program, Fostering Prevention.  

Despite the pandemic, 2021 was a year of significant growth. New offices, expanded programs, and new staff meant that we were able to serve more children in Missouri and Kansas than ever before - 7,198 children and youth. We were able to find and purchase a forever home for our Chillicothe Family Resource Center. We also welcomed increased funding from Missouri and Kansas to grow our services geographically and programmatically across both states, enabling us to open new resource centers in Joplin, Hannibal, Macon and Kirksville. The KCK Capital Campaign launched to help fund our renovations to the historical Kansan building, which will create space for resources to support youth aging out of foster care through our CCYP program, vocational job training, and a 15-bed emergency drop in shelter for youth ages 17-23.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.08

Average of 1.30 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.5

Average of 4.1 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

27%

Average of 14% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Foster Adopt Connect

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Foster Adopt Connect

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Foster Adopt Connect

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Foster Adopt Connect’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $2,421,385 $328,651 $1,957,635 $1,257,624 $1,812,686
As % of expenses 39.3% 4.9% 28.8% 14.1% 10.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $2,255,445 $151,839 $1,759,914 $1,054,536 $1,516,611
As % of expenses 35.7% 2.2% 25.2% 11.6% 8.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $8,089,606 $10,250,716 $9,176,216 $8,168,684 $18,851,984
Total revenue, % change over prior year 45.4% 26.7% -10.5% -11.0% 130.8%
Program services revenue 80.6% 60.0% 72.1% 8.4% 6.5%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.1% 0.2% 0.2% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 11.4% 41.0% 16.0%
All other grants and contributions 19.1% 39.9% 16.3% 67.5% 77.2%
Other revenue 0.2% 0.0% 0.0% -16.9% 0.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $6,155,305 $6,693,994 $6,785,842 $8,894,580 $17,190,524
Total expenses, % change over prior year 30.4% 8.8% 1.4% 31.1% 93.3%
Personnel 83.5% 82.0% 83.4% 79.1% 76.8%
Professional fees 1.9% 2.3% 3.1% 3.9% 3.3%
Occupancy 3.6% 4.4% 3.2% 3.5% 3.3%
Interest 1.2% 0.9% 0.6% 0.4% 0.1%
Pass-through 2.2% 2.9% 4.0% 2.8% 4.5%
All other expenses 7.6% 7.6% 5.7% 10.3% 11.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $6,321,245 $6,870,806 $6,983,563 $9,097,668 $17,486,599
One month of savings $512,942 $557,833 $565,487 $741,215 $1,432,544
Debt principal payment $40,358 $496,910 $46,113 $34,294 $615,210
Fixed asset additions $576,993 $2,274,689 $481,747 $0 $1,099,487
Total full costs (estimated) $7,451,538 $10,200,238 $8,076,910 $9,873,177 $20,633,840

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 4.2 4.9 6.1 5.8 1.5
Months of cash and investments 4.2 4.9 6.1 5.8 1.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 4.5 -0.2 2.3 4.5 2.4
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $2,147,368 $2,716,992 $3,445,907 $4,300,774 $2,121,654
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $684,812 $919,509 $775,449 $1,599,112 $3,593,575
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $4,683,019 $6,935,239 $8,318,991 $7,482,846 $8,582,333
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 15.6% 12.7% 13.0% 17.1% 18.3%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 26.3% 13.4% 11.4% 13.1% 15.5%
Unrestricted net assets $4,723,993 $4,875,832 $7,513,819 $8,568,355 $10,084,966
Temporarily restricted net assets $297,320 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $297,320 $3,525,391 $2,662,610 $1,998,542 $2,068,008
Total net assets $5,021,313 $8,401,223 $10,176,429 $10,566,897 $12,152,974

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO & Founder

Lori Ross

Lori is the founder, CEO and of FosterAdopt Connect. Lori and her husband Randy have been foster/adoptive parents since 1985, caring for more than 400 foster children and adopting 23 children, in addition to their five biological children. Lori holds a degree in psychology from Park University. Lori worked with other families to help found FosterAdopt Connect in 1998 initially as a support group, and in 2000 as a nonprofit agency, and has served as the organization's CEO since that time. Lori has also worked with the North American Council on Adoptable Children (NACAC) as a consultant in their Community Champions Network, providing child welfare services in the states of Texas, Colorado, and Ohio. Throughout her career, Lori has served on a variety of boards and task forces related to foster care and adoption, including serving as the chair of the Missouri Task Force on Children's Justice. She is currently the board chair for Voice of Adoption.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Foster Adopt Connect

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Foster Adopt Connect

Board of directors
as of 01/19/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Melaine McDole

Enterprise Holdings, Inc

Amy Devine

Eversana Intouch

Ben Brouse

Hostess Brands

Brent Wilson

CBIZ & Mayer Hoffman McCann P.C.

Clayton Yearns

David Woods

Hughes, Hubbard & Reed

Douglas Ghertner

J. Eugene Balloun

Shook, Hardy & Bacon

Ivan Cortes

Littler Mendelson P.C.

Ken Marker

Wells Fargo Advisors

Madison Hatten

Shook, Hardy & Bacon

Margi Pence

Mark Hegarty

Shook, Hardy & Bacon

Max Wilber

Christensen Group Insurance

Melanie McDole

Enterprise Holdings, Inc.

Molly Wilson

Pratt & Grisham, LLC

Raimonda Shelton

AdventHealth Shawnee Mission

Stephen Kaine

Children's Mercy

Tim Decker

Consultant

Wes Engram

Integrity 9 Sports & Entertainment

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/7/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data