PLATINUM2024

Alexandra L Rowan Foundation

Houston, TX   |  http://www.alexrowanfoundation.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Alexandra L Rowan Foundation

EIN: 46-4913065


Mission

The Alexandra L. Rowan Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, is focused on contributing to the reduction of lives lost due to blood clots among women using hormonal birth control. The Rowan Foundation is dedicated to: 1) Improving awareness about the blood clot risks posed by hormonal birth control 2) Educating women about their potential blood clot risk factors as well as the signs and symptoms of blood clots and 3) Providing information and resources to help women make informed choices about contraception. The efforts of the Rowan Foundation help to fill crucial information gaps about hormonal birth control and blood clots and, in doing so, serve the legacy of Alexandra Rowan, who lost her life at the age of 23 due to a blood clot in her lung.

Ruling year info

2014

Principal Officer

David Rowan

Main address

5b W Shady Ln

Houston, TX 77063 USA

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EIN

46-4913065

Subject area info

Nonprofits

Health care quality

Patient-centered care

Family planning

Hematology

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Population served info

Adults

Families

Adolescent parents

Ethnic and racial groups

NTEE code info

Public Foundations (T30)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Private Nonoperating Foundation

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-PF.

Tax forms

Show Forms 990

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Rowan Foundation is dedicated to helping reduce the number of lives lost to preventable blood clots. Through broad based awareness and education campaigns, the Rowan Foundation works to increase awareness about the continuum of blood clot risks women face throughout their lives, including family planning and birth control, pregnancy and childbirth, and the treatment of menopause symptoms with hormone therapy. Central to the Rowan Foundation's work is ensuring that women are fully informed about their contraception options. Each year, up to 1,000 women lose their life to blood clots associated with combined hormonal contraception. Birth control is a woman's choice. Our aim is to help ensure that women have access to all the information they need to make a choice that is both effective in meeting their personal preferences and needs and safe relative to their personal health history.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Blood Clot Awareness Month Recognition

Each year, during the month of March, which is recognized in the United States as Blood Clot Awareness Month (BCAM), the Alexandra L. Rowan Foundation implements a nationwide educational campaign about the importance of recognizing the risks for and side effects linked to life-threatening blood clots. Hormonal contraception is one of several factors that can increase a woman's risk for blood clots and this annual initiative provides women with the information they need to make informed decisions as they consider their contraception options. Tactically, this educational program can involve a spectrum of activities, including the development and promotion of educational materials and integrated digital media initiatives.

Population(s) Served

Each year, the Rowan Foundation capitalizes on the educational opportunities presented by the annual recognition of National Women's Health Month to raise awareness about the continuum of blood clot risks linked to several life stages that women experience, including: birth control and family planning, pregnancy and childbirth, and the treatment of menopause symptoms with estrogen later in life.

The Foundation implements both traditional and digital marketing initiatives throughout the month to reach women with potentially life-saving information they need to manage their blood clotting risks.

Most recently, in connection with Women's Health Month, the Foundation introduced its inaugural "Women's Health & Clotting e-Bulletin."

Population(s) Served

College involves many crucial decisions, including decisions about relationships and sexuality. Many young women first consider their birth control options when they move from their family home to their college dorm. During the Rowan Foundation's annual Back-to-Campus campaign, the organization shares information to help students make informed decisions about their contraception options.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of website pageviews

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Rowan Foundation more than doubled the number of visitors to its website in 2023.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Blood Clot Awareness Month Recognition

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In the past two years, the Rowan Foundation garnered 300+ million impressions with feature stories about contraception and blood clot risks placed on 1,000+ online news and information websites.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Alexandra L. Rowan Foundation is dedicated to: 1) Improving awareness about the blood clot risks posed by hormonal birth control 2) Educating women about their potential blood clot risk factors as well as the signs and symptoms of blood clots and 3) Providing information and resources to help women make informed choices about contraception.

The efforts of the Rowan Foundation help to fill crucial information gaps about hormonal birth control and blood clots and, in doing so, serve the legacy of Alexandra Rowan, who lost her life at the age of 23 due to a blood clot in her lung.

The strategic imperatives of the Rowan Foundation are three-fold:

1. Serve as a primary information source related to women's health, specifically as it relates to the continuum of blood clot risks women face throughout their lifetime, including a) family planning and contraception decision-making b) pregnancy and childbirth and c) the treatment of menopause symptoms later in a woman's life.
2. Share a spectrum of comprehensive resources to meet the diverse information needs of women nationwide related to women's health, reproductive health, and blood clot risks.
3. Capitalize on multiple touchpoints to share information and educational resources with the widest most diverse target audience of women aged 18+, as well as their family and friends.

The Rowan Foundation has been creating and implementing successful women's health educational programs since 2013. The organization employs/contracts with experts in public health, particularly as it pertains to venous thromboembolism, public health education, digital marketing, web design/development, communications, patient education, editorial relations, medical/health writing, and social media.

With thousands of followers on social media, the Foundation also works closely with other organizations and individuals either expert in this field or with direct personal experience as blood clot patients or the family members of individuals affected by blood clots.

The organization maintains a unique and comprehensive website focused on women's health and blood clots, and houses an impressive inventory of educational resources, including checklists, infographics, a quarterly e-bulletin, and videos.

The Foundation was formed to honor the memory of Alexandra Rowan, who lost her life suddenly to a massive pulmonary embolism or blood clot in her lung at the age of 23 in 2013. Her only known risk factor at the time was hormonal contraception.

Since 2013, the Rowan Foundation has invested $1 million into it's awareness and educational efforts, including broad-based national education programs utilizing radio spots, local publicity, print articles, digital media, and ongoing social media outreach. These initiatives have combined to reach 100s of millions of people throughout the United States and abroad with potentially life-saving information about the lifelong risk of blood clots linked to birth control, pregnancy, and menopause.

Most recently, the Foundation has greatly expanded it's website, increasing its web traffic more than 100% compared to the previous year. The organization also recently created more than a dozen new infographics and several new educational videos. With its social media efforts, the Rowan Foundation increased it's Facebook engagement five-fold, with more than a 60% increase in Facebook and Instagram followers in both 2022 and 2023. Through its editorial efforts, the organization has also garnered more than 300 million impressions with feature stories placed with online news and information websites nationwide.

In 2023, the Foundation introduced its new "Women's Health & Clotting Quarterly e-Bulletin," and began exploring opportunities for a university based health seminar focused on women's health and clotting, as well as collaboration in the genetics testing space.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Alexandra L Rowan Foundation
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Alexandra L Rowan Foundation

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Alexandra L Rowan Foundation

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Principal Officer

David Rowan

Alexandra L Rowan Foundation

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Alexandra L Rowan Foundation

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

David Rowan

Rosalyn Rowan

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/11/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/28/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.