PLATINUM2024

Marrakech

Embracing Human Potential

Woodbridge, CT   |  www.Marrakechinc.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Marrakech

EIN: 23-7148533


Mission

Mission To provide residential, employment, support, referral, and advocacy services to individuals with disabilities and people with similar service needs to assist them in exercising their human rights as citizens and contributing members of society.

Ruling year info

1972

President & CEO

Ms. Heather I. LaTorra

Main address

6 Lunar Drive

Woodbridge, CT 06525 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-7148533

Subject area info

Residential mental health care

Employment

Transitional living

Population served info

Adolescents

Adults

Economically disadvantaged people

People with disabilities

Unemployed people

NTEE code info

Group Home, Residential Treatment Facility - Mental Health Related (F33)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Group Home, Residential Treatment Facility - Mental Health Related (F33)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Work to Learn

The Work Learn Programs, located in New Haven, and Waterbury are funded by the Department of Children and Families . ECE/BCE provides services for youth, ages fourteen to twenty-three years old, who are currently in or transitioning from foster care services. This program provides educational, vocational, employment, financial literacy, life skills, personal and community connections, and other support services. Youth also have the opportunity to take part in onsite youth businesses as well as community internships and receive a modest stipend as compensation for their work.
Once a youth has successfully completed an internship, he or she may begin to look for community employment. In order to be referred to this phase of service, the youth must demonstrate the skills and ability to work independently in the community (mastery of life skills, good communication and vocational skills, transportation plan, etc.). The youth will work with the job developer to find employment.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adolescents

The Academy for Human Service Training (AHST) prepares individuals for entry-level careers in the Human Service or Customer Service fields through a combination of classroom and hands-on training. The statewide program provides occupational skills training, assistance with basic education needs, case management, as well as job placement and retention activities. Instructors for this program are typically managers or administrators in the human service field who have participated in Train the Trainer activities to be eligible to teach certification and other specialized course or who have the direct experience and knowledge about the topic being addressed. Follow up services are provided post-graduation for a minimum of 90 days up to 1 full year. Classes are held both virtually and in-person, Monday - Friday from 9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. and generally operate on a 15-week cycle.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Adults

Provides services to individuals with a developmental disability who are living in their family home, as well as to adults living in their own apartments who receive less than 24/7 supports. Staff work with each individual to increase independence at home, self-help skills, household management, budgeting, recreation and leisure planning, socialization and safety skills in the community.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Community Living Arrangements and Intermediate Care Facilities are licensed Group Homes providing residential services to individuals with Developmental Disabilities. 24-hour support is provided. Group Homes range from three-bed programs up to seven-bed programs. With the ultimate goal of increased independence, all service plans are individualized and person centered. Locations are statewide.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

The
ABI department provides services to individuals who qualify for the Connecticut
ABI waiver I and II under Title 19. Services provided include pre-vocational skills, independent living
skills training (ILST), supported employment, companion
services, respite services, Recovery Assistant, family training and community living support
services. Service plans are
individualized to the persons being served and may range from a few hours per
week to 24/7 support. Marrakech does not
maintain a waitlist for services. However,
there is typically a short period of time between point of referral and start
of services while we identify and hire qualified staff or while housing is
being located. Services are available statewide.

Population(s) Served
Adults
People with physical disabilities

Where we work

Accreditations

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Employment and Community Services - 3 Year Accreditation 2012

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Employment and Community Services - 3 Year Accreditation 2015

CARF International - Employment and Community Services - 3 Year Accreditation 2018

Awards

Equity and Inclusive Opportunity Award 2020

Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce

Affiliations & memberships

Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce 1988

Connecticut Community Nonprofit Alliance 1990

CARF International 1991

National Alliance for Direct Support Professionals 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Unemployed people, People with disabilities, Adults, Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Like many other employers, we are still experiencing a staffing shortage, which has resulted in waitlists for services that we did not have in the past.

Number of service recipients who are employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Unemployed people, People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number competitively employed annually depends on number served seeking employment, which can change year to year. Therefore the options to define success for this metric in this form is limited.

Number of youth receiving services (e.g., groups, skills and job training, etc.) with youths living in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This data stems primarily from two programs - our DCF-funded Work to Learn program as well as BRS-funded Level Up summer vocational program for high school students.

Number of direct care staff who received training in primary prevention strategies and other techniques to avoid the need for restraint and seclusion

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with intellectual disabilities, People with psychosocial disabilities, People with other disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is essential to the maintaining the health and safety of the people we support and to providing services in the least restrictive manner possible. Increasing stats shows higher compliance to regs

Average number of dollars received per donor

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As an organization, we are always striving to be less dependent on state-funded contracts so that we have the ability to support quality of life programming and other unfunded initiatives.

Number of donors retained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As an organization, we are always striving to be less dependent on state-funded contracts so that we have the ability to support quality of life programming and other unfunded initiatives.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.62

Average of 0.37 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.1

Average of 4 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

27%

Average of 20% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Marrakech

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Marrakech

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Marrakech

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Marrakech’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $1,221,177 $541,692 $702,144 $623,554 $588,509
As % of expenses 14.4% 6.7% 9.0% 7.9% 7.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $712,325 -$21,348 $149,361 $76,032 $16,387
As % of expenses 7.9% -0.2% 1.8% 0.9% 0.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $9,651,656 $8,568,239 $8,533,229 $8,525,359 $9,043,976
Total revenue, % change over prior year -1.3% -11.2% -0.4% -0.1% 6.1%
Program services revenue 91.5% 96.2% 94.4% 93.2% 92.4%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0%
Government grants 5.4% 0.7% 1.4% 3.1% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 2.8% 3.2% 3.2% 3.2% 6.8%
Other revenue 0.3% -0.1% 0.8% 0.4% 0.9%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $8,493,259 $8,027,109 $7,831,085 $7,888,594 $8,455,467
Total expenses, % change over prior year -7.6% -5.5% -2.4% 0.7% 7.2%
Personnel 60.4% 62.1% 61.9% 60.6% 63.8%
Professional fees 9.8% 9.6% 8.8% 9.4% 7.4%
Occupancy 10.0% 9.4% 9.3% 9.2% 8.7%
Interest 3.2% 3.1% 2.9% 2.5% 2.2%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 16.7% 15.9% 17.1% 18.2% 17.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $9,002,111 $8,590,149 $8,383,868 $8,436,116 $9,027,589
One month of savings $707,772 $668,926 $652,590 $657,383 $704,622
Debt principal payment $481,478 $12,808 $563,504 $820,913 $260,359
Fixed asset additions $584,330 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $10,775,691 $9,271,883 $9,599,962 $9,914,412 $9,992,570

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 3.4 4.1 6.9 7.4 7.1
Months of cash and investments 3.4 4.1 6.9 7.4 7.1
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 4.8 5.5 5.6 4.8 4.5
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $2,383,467 $2,773,633 $4,516,943 $4,893,738 $5,024,208
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $378,395 $38,698 $213,934 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $16,949,152 $17,182,862 $17,393,916 $17,693,216 $17,233,499
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 46.2% 49.0% 51.6% 53.9% 54.3%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 51.3% 54.0% 56.7% 48.2% 51.8%
Unrestricted net assets $7,291,257 $7,269,909 $7,419,270 $7,495,302 $7,511,689
Temporarily restricted net assets $24,053 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $24,053 $23,491 $23,491 $36,702 $36,702
Total net assets $7,315,310 $7,293,400 $7,442,761 $7,532,004 $7,548,391

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President & CEO

Ms. Heather I. LaTorra

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Marrakech

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Marrakech

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Marrakech

Board of directors
as of 02/28/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Steven Shwartz

Suzanne J. Letso

Milestones Behavioral Health

Jeffrey H. Euben

Retired

Bobby Peterson

Consumer Advocate

Ann Arpino

Marcum LLP

Deborah L. Stanley-McAulay

Yale University

Ihssane Khatib

Northwestern Mutual

Greta E. Solomon

Cohen and Wolf, P.C.

David M. Ferretti

Webster Bank

Myra S. Stanley

Yale New Haven Health System

Delores H. Strode

Houlihan Lawrence Wareck D'Ostilio

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/24/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/24/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.