PLATINUM2024

Houston Community ToolBank, Inc. Subordinate

Empowering communities with Tools for Change.

aka Houston ToolBank   |   Houston, TX   |  www.houstontoolbank.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Houston Community ToolBank, Inc.

EIN: 46-1152387  Subordinate info


Mission

The Houston ToolBank serves community-based organizations by providing tools, equipment, and expertise to empower their most ambitious goals. Since opening our doors in late 2014, the ToolBank has consistently increased our member organizations’ capacity to make a difference. Access to ToolBank tools eliminates the need for agencies to incur the expense of purchasing, insuring, repairing, and storing tools, reducing the costs associated with service projects and allowing these agencies to focus more of their resources on their mission.

Ruling year info

2010

Executive Director

Marly Maskill

Main address

1215 Gazin St.

Houston, TX 77020 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-1152387

Subject area info

Environment

Civic participation

Community improvement

Basic and emergency aid

Youth development

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Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Ethnic and racial groups

Religious groups

Immigrants and migrants

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Citizen Participation (W24)

Environmental Quality, Protection, and Beautification N.E.C. (C99)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Affiliations

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Oftentimes, volunteer projects are slowed down or held up by a lack of adequate equipment. Any individual who has volunteered has probably experienced a tool shortage at some point. Maybe a school gets a large group together to clean up their grounds, then the day arrives and there are not enough rakes, shovels or gloves to go around. Or a group of expert volunteers is brought together to do maintenance on an elderly person’s home and there are only two air compressors for ten pneumatic tools. Or, following a large scale disaster, a local church sees a surge of volunteers but faces a tool shortage of wheelbarrows, shovels and sledgehammers necessary for mucking and gutting. All of these problems result in projects that are less efficient and more expensive for organizations that are often short on resources already, taking time and money away from a charitable group's core mission.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Tool Lending Program

The ToolBank provides tools and resources to charitable groups to enhance mission related effort and volunteer retention. The tool program allows organizations to borrow tools needs for a variety of projects.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Young adults

The Houston ToolBank provides tools and resources to organizations providing relief effort in a time of disaster.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Young adults

Tool School equips its participants with the appropriate skills and knowledge to safely and properly use common hand and power tools through small group training sessions in a hands-on learning environment with ToolBank representatives. The program is designed to bridge gaps in the areas of tool use, repair & safety, and workforce development for youth, young adults, and adults of ALL ABILITIES.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults
People with disabilities
Students
Unemployed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Value of Tools Lent

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Tool Lending Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the measurement of the total retail value of tools lent to the community.

Number of Volunteers Equipped

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Tool Lending Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of volunteer equipped with our tools and equipment.

Number of Projects Equipped

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Tool Lending Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Projects equipped, as reported by our borrowing members.

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Tool Lending Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of members that have used us within a year. This fluctuates greatly depending upon external factors like disaster or the pandemic.

Number of Tool Orders

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Tool Lending Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of orders fulfilled and sent out into the community. One order may equip multiple projects and many volunteers.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Houston Toolbank is constantly filling a variety of needs in the community. Our primary goal is to become a flexible and invaluable resource for the nonprofit community. Just like each of our tools, the Toolbank has more than one use. When a small, volunteer-run 5k is trying to raise money rather than spend it, we provide affordable chairs, tables, and tents. When a school has a one-day playground build with hundreds of volunteers, we supply shovels, rakes, and power tools to support their event so they do not have to purchase the items. When an Eagle scout is working to build a footbridge on a local trailer, we provide drills, circular saws, sawhorses and nail guns that speed the project and ensure safety through the use of equipment suited to the project. When an underserved neighborhood is affected by a hurricane, we deploy muck and gut kits and PPE to response groups as fast as possible so that they can ensure residents' homes do not experience significant structural issues.

Every time one of our members borrows our tools, they save money and resources on related costs - purchase, storage, and maintenance - and can redirect those resources to other areas of need. While growing a comprehensive tool and equipment library is our core goal, we envision a community where the Houston ToolBank is a resource that frees up any charitable group to focus on their own diverse goals that make our region more vibrant, stronger, safer, and equitable in the years to come.

Ideally, we are a changing resource; we evolve and grow within our community, building inventory to match project needs and continually gaining new members. Because our inventory shows us when a requested item is not in stock, we are able to keep a running list of items that need to be expanded. In addition, we frequently ask members what it is that they need that we do not have, and put these items on a priority list for future purchase as funding is acquired. Inventory growth happens in a variety of ways - through donation from the community, funder support, and in-kind donations from for-profit groups.

At the same time, we continue to make outreach a priority. One way we can build membership is through attending local volunteer fairs where we can connect with groups that are hosting projects. Another is through building lists of a particular type of organization, such as civic clubs, and working our way through that list. We always encourage organizations to share our name whenever they are hosting a project using our tools and we brand all of our tools with ToolBank blue or stickers. We maintain an active Facebook and Instagram page to continue to spread the word about our services in the online realm as well. We are also expanding our footprint by adding new pick up containers in four locations around Greater Houston to ease access for organizations that are located far from our central warehouse location.

The Houston ToolBank has a comprehensive, extensive, and flexible inventory. Our warehouse has >300 tool types and >15,000 individual units, with conventional "tools" like hammers and power drills; events equipment like tables, chairs, a portable stage, projectors, hotspots, and pop-up tents; generators, portable AC’s, and dehumidifiers; and more. This vast inventory is available to nonprofits for their mission-focused work. ToolBank borrowers are mainstream nonprofits, schools, faith-based orgs, neighborhood associations, disaster recovery groups, scout troops, environmental coalitions, and more. We shoulder the responsibility of insuring, repairing, and storing the tools so our partners can spend time and resources focusing on their critical work.

While Houston’s nonprofit community is extensive, the region’s sprawl and traffic present barriers to potential borrowers further afield. In response, we formalized delivery services by adding Neighborhood Tool Hubs and hiring a delivery driver in 2021. The Hubs are repurposed shipping containers transformed into spacious lockers equipped with smart locks that serve as convenient remote drop-off and pick-up spots for members who have restricted access to our warehouse located on the east side of downtown Houston. Six Hubs are located and utilized in Fort Bend (Jones Creek Ranch Park in Richmond), Galveston (Moody Methodist Church on Galveston Island), Brazoria (St. John Lutheran Church in Angleton), Montgomery (Tree of Life Lutheran Church in Conroe), Western Harris (Pines Presbyterian Church at CityCentre), and Jefferson (Salvation Army in Beaumont) Counties. We are tentatively anticipating an additional Fort Bend County Hub placement in Q1 of 2025 (location TBD).

This program is designed to be both accessible to our members and sustainable for us. For everyday projects, we charge a tool handling fee of 3% of a tool’s retail value per week (e.g. a $150 power washer costs $4.50 to borrow for one week, and a $10 hammer is 30 cents). The fee creates borrower accountability and helps offset small portions of warehouse staffing and inventory management. All disaster-related borrowing is free of charge.

We’ve supported more than 10,000 disaster recovery projects across 230+ organizations, but there have been moments of missed opportunity when we weren’t able to get items out ahead of the storm. Mucking-and-gutting a flooded home the day after an event versus weeks after can mean the difference between minor repair versus extensive mold remediation and systems replacement. We formalized a Disaster Preparedness Program that addresses this delay by partnering with nonprofits and community leaders to pre-position tools in neighborhoods most likely impacted by disaster. By pre-positioning these critical response tools in advance of major weather events, we can help ensure they are ready for use as soon as they are needed and can ensure our community is more adequately equipped for timely response.

As of June 2024, we have equipped more than 310,000 volunteers with $15 million worth of tools on 27,500 projects. In 2019, we were the busiest ToolBank in the country. In 2020, despite tremendous challenges related to the pandemic, we were able to serve over 150 different organizations that worked with 30,000 volunteers. We added PPE distribution to our mission, and have thus far distributed over 300,000 masks, hand sanitizer bottles and gloves to nonprofits working on the frontlines of some of our regions biggest challenges. Ultimately, while these numbers are impressive, what we are most proud of is supporting so many important organizations - 865 in our almost decade of service - doing good in their communities. Our partners each have their own story, every one of which is made a little stronger by access to our tools. In the future, the Houston ToolBank hopes to expand our membership and become a household name in Southeast Texas. Ultimately, our goal is to be a service that the entire nonprofit community knows about and uses whenever our tools can provide them with what they need for a project or event.

Financials

Houston Community ToolBank, Inc.
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

47.96

Average of 34.71 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.7

Average of 65.3 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8%

Average of 11% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Houston Community ToolBank, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Houston Community ToolBank, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Houston Community ToolBank, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Houston Community ToolBank, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $115,236 $71,984 $179,883 $118,910 $100,207
As % of expenses 15.6% 14.5% 27.8% 27.2% 13.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $60,800 $5,754 $108,370 $45,949 $27,611
As % of expenses 7.6% 1.0% 15.1% 9.0% 3.4%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $679,308 $698,016 $685,709 $570,806 $773,747
Total revenue, % change over prior year -49.0% 2.8% -1.8% -16.8% 35.6%
Program services revenue 7.8% 6.7% 4.2% 7.9% 9.5%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.1% 0.0% 0.3% 0.0% 0.4%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 22.1% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 92.2% 93.3% 92.7% 70.0% 84.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 2.8% 0.0% 6.1%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $740,792 $494,982 $647,676 $437,105 $738,588
Total expenses, % change over prior year -19.4% -33.2% 30.8% -32.5% 69.0%
Personnel 34.1% 68.1% 35.7% 56.2% 30.2%
Professional fees 1.0% 1.8% 6.1% 9.4% 6.4%
Occupancy 3.7% 6.0% 4.4% 8.8% 5.9%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 39.6% 1.1% 5.7% 6.5% 33.6%
All other expenses 21.6% 22.9% 48.1% 19.1% 24.0%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $795,228 $561,212 $719,189 $510,066 $811,184
One month of savings $61,733 $41,249 $53,973 $36,425 $61,549
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $63,280 $0
Fixed asset additions $93,096 $81,910 $127,499 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $950,057 $684,371 $900,661 $609,771 $872,733

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 4.5 9.7 7.2 10.8 1.7
Months of cash and investments 4.5 9.7 7.2 10.8 6.0
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets -2.1 5.3 5.0 9.0 6.0
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $277,201 $401,436 $390,331 $393,190 $102,229
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $269,581
Receivables $0 $2,150 $0 $902 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $380,028 $461,938 $552,327 $612,579 $673,313
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 50.6% 56.0% 53.0% 59.5% 64.9%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.4% 1.2% 11.5% 0.8% 1.3%
Unrestricted net assets $60,800 $421,502 $529,872 $575,821 $603,432
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $191,850 $50,000 $64,791 $0
Total net assets $476,548 $613,352 $579,872 $640,612 $603,432

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors Yes No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Marly Maskill

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Houston Community ToolBank, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Houston Community ToolBank, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 06/20/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Fred Stow

Stow & Associates

Term: 2024 - 2025

John Byrd

ByrdGEO

Eric Khan

PNC

Dixie Meynier

Stow & Associates

Tony Nicosia

Cox Automotive

Britt Sudduth

Sudduth Search

Fred Stow

Stow & Associates

Luke Withers

Forney Construction

Claudia Ortega Hogue

SSP Engineering

Erika Jones

Frost Bank

Lharissa Jacobs

FIT Houston

Susan Cita

TBG Partners

Trey Flores

Sunnova

Victor Mondragon

OneSolution

Kiran Bardai

Galena Park Ace Hardware

Eric Dickinson

Port Houston

Zurisiday Briz

Community Volunteer

Meredith Wheeler

Sesh Coworking

Ben Weibel

Brookstone Construction

David King

Groves Industrial

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/20/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data