PLATINUM2024

KATAL CENTER FOR EQUITY HEALTH AND JUSTICE

Brooklyn, NY   |  www.katalcenter.org
GuideStar Charity Check

KATAL CENTER FOR EQUITY HEALTH AND JUSTICE

EIN: 81-1323278


Mission

Katal is a community organization that works in Connecticut and New York to strengthen the people, policies, institutions, and movements that advance equity, health, and justice for everyone. We envision a world where all communities have the resources and power to exercise self-determination and participate meaningfully in the democratic process. We launched in 2016 with three big, interrelated goals: -building leadership and organizing capacity of neighborhood residents, as well as organizers, advocates, and community groups, to effectively drive and shape systemic change -ending mass criminalization, mass incarceration, and the war on drugs; and -advancing evidence-based solutions to promote and secure equity, health, and justice

Ruling year info

2016

Co-Founder and Co-Executive Director

Lorenzo Jones

Co-executive director

gabriel sayegh

Main address

147 Prince Street

Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-1323278

Subject area info

Public safety

Human rights

Population served info

Young adults

Ethnic and racial groups

Economically disadvantaged people

Incarcerated people

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (I01)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

Affiliations

See related organizations info

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

For too long, communities of color in Connecticut and New York – especially Black and Latinx people – have been impacted by systemic racism, mass criminalization, and mass incarceration. The government is spending millions every year to arrest and lock people up – disproportionately people of color — while failing to invest enough into the basic needs of every community in our state – housing, healthcare, education, jobs. The state department with the most staff in Connecticut is the Department of Corrections, which has twice as many staff as the Department of Transportation. Meanwhile, in New York, there's a crisis at Rikers Island. The conditions at New York City’s massive jail complex are horrific and life-threatening for human beings—the people incarcerated and those who work there. Violence is rampant. Racism and other types of bias are deeply entrenched. And although Black and Latinx people constitute about 53% of the city’s population, they represent almost 90% of admissions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Our State Level Work: Decarceration and Movement Building in Connecticut and New York

Over the last 20 years, advocates (including Katal founders and staff) have advanced impressive criminal justice and drug policy reforms in in Connecticut and New York. In both states, crime rates and prison populations are down, and both states have closed prisons and are frequently cited as models for reform. Yet mass incarceration and the drug war still continue, jail and prison populations remain stubbornly high and more far reaching reforms are still needed. To truly end mass incarceration and the drug war, Katal works on systemic change, building a decarceration agenda in CT and NY to secure health, equity, and justice for everyone.

This past year, we launched two additional campaigns—#FreeThemNowCT and #FreeThemNowNY—to demand the release of people from jails and prisons in the face of COVID-19. We organized thousands of people to take action with us online and in person (socially distanced!); testified before state legislatures; pushed the issue into the forefront of mainstream Connecticut news coverage and spurred the Lamont administration to release hundreds of people from prisons; and with our partners statewide helped secure the release of nearly 1,000 people from jails in New York. We also convened two national Zoom calls to discuss the impact of COVID-19 at the intersections of housing, health care, the drug war, mass incarceration, and more.

We also continue to convene our popular statewide criminal justice reform calls, which bring together hundreds of people every month—including directly impacted people, community leaders, and advocates—to share information and build momentum for state-based campaigns to end mass incarceration.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Economically disadvantaged people

There are approximately 731,000 individuals held daily in local jails across the country. Local jails have 19 times the annual admissions compared to state and federal prisons. Local cities and counties are where the gears of mass incarceration grind on -- over 11 million people go to jail each year in the United States, referred to as a “churn rate.” Most people in jails are individuals who are detained pretrial and are therefore legally presumed innocent. Katal is working in Connecticut and New York to reduce the number of people churning through jails every year, and to achieve systemic reform to end the drug war and mass incarceration at the local level.

This past year in Connecticut, where racial disparities in mass incarceration are particularly stark, we organized to demand justice for incarcerated people and their families. In New York, we built momentum for our #LessIsMoreNY Act, a bill that would impact nearly 40,000 people on parole statewide—mostly Black and Latinx people—and could lead to the release of more than 5,000 people from prisons and jails (that’s more than 15% of the overall state prison population).

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Ethnic and racial groups

The right to a speedy trial is enshrined in the Sixth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. In New York State, it is implemented through Criminal Procedure Law 30.30. However, CPL 30.30 contains loopholes that, when compounded by severe court backlogs, lead to unreasonable delays for people who have been charged but not convicted of a crime. In New York City alone, nearly 80% of the people in jail are detained pre-trial, forced to spend extra months, or even years, in pre-trial detention as they await their day in court.

In 2019 we passed groundbreaking pretrial reform legislation in New York. Those reforms took effect in January this year, cutting jail populations statewide, including a 40 percent reduction in New York City, a critical step to closing the Rikers Island jail complex. Then we defended the new bail laws against well-funded efforts to repeal them. And we addressed and joined the national reckoning about racism through our writings, our organizing, and our direct actions.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

In the wake of the opioid overdose and addiction crisis, communities are demanding new approaches to drug addiction, overdose prevention, and access to treatment. Katal is working with local communities in Connecticut and New York to develop harm reduction oriented interventions to improve safety and health. This includes training police and public health departments in harm reduction, developing Community Leadership Teams, and supporting access to healthcare.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Economically disadvantaged people

Our Building Leadership and Organizing Capacity (BLOC) model is our flagship training and leadership development program. BLOC equips participants with the important community organizing tools and tactics for base building with people for power.

Through BLOC, we train people in models of social change; the how-to’s of community organizing and advocacy, leadership development, strategic planning, issue cuts, and more. We coach and mentor new and veteran organizers and advocacy organizations. We hold BLOC organizing roundtables in both Connecticut and New York, and hold BLOC trainings across the country.

In 2020, we expanded BLOC, including our Connecticut Organizer Roundtable. In that setting, nearly two dozen community organizers—mostly women of color—met monthly through the year, via Zoom, for peer-to-peer learning, coaching, and mentoring. Three more young people completed our Organizer Apprenticeship this year. And we conducted more than 100 coaching sessions with organizers and advocates around the country.

Population(s) Served
Young adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Great Nonprofits - TopRated 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of advocacy contacts with government leaders

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Our State Level Work: Decarceration and Movement Building in Connecticut and New York

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of members from priority population attending training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Our State Level Work: Decarceration and Movement Building in Connecticut and New York

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new champions or stakeholders recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Our State Level Work: Decarceration and Movement Building in Connecticut and New York

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of media articles reflecting preferred issue framing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Our State Level Work: Decarceration and Movement Building in Connecticut and New York

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We launched in 2016 with three big, interrelated goals:

· building leadership and organizing capacity of neighborhood residents, as well as organizers, advocates, and community groups, to effectively drive and shape systemic change;

· ending mass criminalization, mass incarceration, and the war on drugs; and

· advancing solutions to promote and secure health, equity, and justice

We work at the municipal and state level to end mass incarceration and the drug war in Connecticut and New York. Building leadership and developing the organizing capacity of directly impacted people and local groups is at the core of our mission and approach, informing every aspect of what we do. Through organizing and leadership development, we seek to strengthen communities and sustain the impact of our work together. We believe that with the right mix of strategies and tactics, utilizing multiple methods for change (organizing, advocacy, research, education, arts/cultural work, and more), and with the right collaborations and partnerships, together we can advance the agenda to finally end mass incarceration and the drug war in CT and NY, and show the country a path to a equitable, healthy, safe, and just future.

Here's how we approach our work with our talented staff:

· Develop and execute high-impact organizing and advocacy reform campaigns at the state and municipal level, frequently through collaborations with partner organizations who share our values.

· Build leadership and organizing capacity of directly impacted people and local groups –especially among people most impacted by policies we want to change

· Leverage work at the municipal and county level to advance state-based reforms.

· Utilize public health research, tools, and methodologies.

· Provide training and technical assistance for organizing, campaign development, advocacy, communications, and more.

· Measure and evaluate the impact of our work and its transactional and transformational outcomes.

· Practice facilitative leadership, a co-creative model centered on deep collaboration.

· Provide capacity for increased civic engagement and opportunities to learn and exercise political education

Heres a quick recap of our work in 2023:

-We released a groundbreaking report with our partners at the Prison Policy Initiative: Excessive, Unjust, and Expensive: Fixing Connecticuts Probation and Parole Problems. The report highlights the massive overuse of community corrections in Connecticut and how these systems have become a trap door to incarceration, especially for Black, Latine, and low-income communities.

-We launched a new project in Connecticut: Cultivating Justice. We know from our organizing that problems such as environmental racism and food insecurity intersect with mass criminalization and incarceration. As a natural step in our organizing, we formed a partnership with Wesleyan Universitys Jewett Center for Community Partnerships and Cultivating Justice was born. The project continues to grow, involving Black, Latine, and low-income communities those most impacted by mass criminalization in Connecticut in chicken keeping, composting, growing crops, cultivating hemp, land management, and beekeeping, while providing training in civic engagement and community organizing.

-In New York, we fought to limit pretrial detention and to reinvest savings from parole reforms. In 2023, we stood against efforts to roll back bail reform further, organizing actions in New York City and joining actions and lobby days in Albany. We continued to monitor the implementation of the #LessIsMoreNY parole reform bill and worked with our partners to organize a series of town halls across the state to hear how New Yorkers want to reinvest the savings realized through reform. Those town halls informed this recent report about how to do just that.

-We grew our campaign to #ShutRikers. We organized to demand that Mayor Eric Adams shut down Rikers. We held rallies and protests and testified multiple times before the New York City Council and the state legislature in Albany. We confronted the mayor on the streets of Manhattan and Brooklyn. We continued to organize for federal intervention: until Rikers is shut down, we are calling for the federal courts to appoint an independent receiver. We worked with New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams to introduce a resolution calling for a receiver to take over city jails and we secured nearly 20 cosponsors.

-In New York City, our organizing team hit more than 120,000 doors! Under the direction of our lead organizer, Melanie Dominguez, our team distributed campaign materials and knocked on more than120,000 doors across all five boroughs. This led to thousands of conversations with New Yorkers about cutting the jail population, shutting down Rikers, and investing in real community safety housing, health care, education, jobs.

We're going even harder in 2024 and look forward to sharing more with you about our progress!

Financials

KATAL CENTER FOR EQUITY HEALTH AND JUSTICE
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

11.59

Average of 9.61 over 7 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

12.4

Average of 7 over 7 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

16%

Average of 16% over 7 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

KATAL CENTER FOR EQUITY HEALTH AND JUSTICE

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

KATAL CENTER FOR EQUITY HEALTH AND JUSTICE

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

KATAL CENTER FOR EQUITY HEALTH AND JUSTICE

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of KATAL CENTER FOR EQUITY HEALTH AND JUSTICE’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$227,604 $203,294 $332,913 $578,299 $57,343
As % of expenses -14.2% 17.0% 36.4% 45.7% 4.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$227,604 $203,294 $332,913 $578,172 $56,290
As % of expenses -14.2% 17.0% 36.4% 45.7% 3.9%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,365,687 $1,180,752 $977,198 $2,150,501 $1,362,299
Total revenue, % change over prior year -34.9% -13.5% -17.2% 120.1% -36.7%
Program services revenue 1.1% 1.6% 0.6% 0.0% 0.5%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 10.3% 4.7% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 98.1% 98.3% 88.7% 95.3% 99.5%
Other revenue 0.8% 0.1% 0.4% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,598,074 $1,197,134 $913,475 $1,264,598 $1,450,498
Total expenses, % change over prior year 19.5% -25.1% -23.7% 38.4% 14.7%
Personnel 58.5% 69.7% 67.2% 59.5% 60.6%
Professional fees 27.3% 19.9% 22.8% 21.8% 20.6%
Occupancy 3.9% 3.6% 2.7% 2.3% 2.9%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 7.5% 6.5%
All other expenses 10.3% 6.9% 7.3% 8.8% 9.4%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,598,074 $1,197,134 $913,475 $1,264,725 $1,451,551
One month of savings $133,173 $99,761 $76,123 $105,383 $120,875
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $3,818 $3,982
Total full costs (estimated) $1,731,247 $1,296,895 $989,598 $1,373,926 $1,576,408

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 1.7 4.9 9.0 13.7 12.4
Months of cash and investments 1.7 4.9 9.0 13.7 12.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 0.1 2.1 7.2 10.6 9.7
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $226,434 $492,354 $682,582 $1,448,993 $1,500,480
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $449,438 $172,612 $600,767 $731,500 $589,442
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $3,818 $7,801
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 3.3% 15.1%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 8.0% 8.7% 6.5% 4.6% 6.1%
Unrestricted net assets $9,039 $212,333 $545,246 $1,123,418 $1,179,708
Temporarily restricted net assets $625,000 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $625,000 $405,324 $662,500 $970,104 $824,562
Total net assets $634,039 $617,657 $1,207,746 $2,093,522 $2,004,270

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Co-Founder and Co-Executive Director

Lorenzo Jones

Lorenzo Jones is the co-founder and co-executive director at the Katal Center for Health, Equity, and Justice. He has more than 25 years of experience mentoring community leaders and organizing communities to make systemic change. As a campaign expert, trainer, strategist, and coach, Jones is sought after by groups across the world. He has trained groups as varied as People’s Action, Open Society Foundations, the Formerly Incarcerated and Convicted Families and People’s Movement, Perrin Family Foundation, Public Welfare Foundation, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Drug Policy Alliance, Council of Europe’s Pompidou Working Group on Drug Policy, & more. Prior to launching Katal, Jones served as the executive director of A Better Way Foundation in Connecticut, using advocacy and organizing to build power in urban, suburban, and rural communities most affected by mass incarceration, the drug war, and the inequitable access to resources.

Co-executive director

gabriel sayegh

gabriel sayegh is the co-founder and co-executive director at the Katal Center for Health, Equity, and Justice. He brings over 20 years of organizing and advocacy experience to dismantle mass incarceration, end the war on drugs, and build communities.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

KATAL CENTER FOR EQUITY HEALTH AND JUSTICE

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

KATAL CENTER FOR EQUITY HEALTH AND JUSTICE

Board of directors
as of 03/20/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Safiya Simmons

SJS Consultants

Chiedza Rodriguez

Our Piece of the Pie Inc.

Lorenzo Jones

Katal Center for Health, Equity and Justice

gabriel sayegh

Katal Center for Health, Equity and Justice

Marie-France Laport

Banana Kelly Community Improvement Association

G. Rosaline “Mama Roz” Preudhomme

Institute for the Black World 21st Century

DeAngelo Bester

Workers Center for Racial Justice

Safiya Simmons

SJS Consultants

Lisa Raville

Harm Reduction Action Center

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/20/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/06/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
There are no contractors recorded for this organization.

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser